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Spiritual effects of hallucinogens persist

Spiritual effects of hallucinogens persist
In a follow-up to research showing that psilocybin, a substance contained in "sacred mushrooms," produces substantial spiritual effects, a Johns Hopkins team reports that those beneficial effects appear to last more than a year. Writing in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, the Johns Hopkins scientists note that most of the 36 volunteer subjects given psilocybin, under controlled conditions in a Hopkins study published in 2006, continued to........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/1/2008 9:38:49 PM)

Find ways to predict IVF success

Find ways to predict IVF success
Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a method that can predict with 70 percent accuracy whether a woman undergoing in vitro fertilization therapy will become pregnant. This information may someday help the tens of thousands of couples who want to undergo IVF each year, and their doctors, decide on their course of action. The new method involves using four factors to determine a woman's chance of becoming........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 7/1/2008 9:29:35 PM)

A step towards better diabetes treatment

A step towards better diabetes treatment
In today's issue of the prestigious journal Cell Metabolism Uppsala researchers are presenting new findings that shed light on the processes that determine the release of the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin. The discovery is based on the development of image analysis methods that make possible the detailed study of events immediately inside the plasma membrane of the insulin-secreting cells. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a universal messenger........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 7/1/2008 8:45:47 PM)

Encouraging European cancer trends

Encouraging European cancer trends
The first research to look at recent trends in European cancer incidence, mortality and survival together has shown that cancer prevention and management in Europe is moving in the right direction. However, the research reveals that variations between countries in policies for mass screening, access to health care and therapy are reflected in the different cancer rates. The research is published in a special issue of the European Journal of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/1/2008 8:41:35 PM)

Designer diet for prostate cancer

Designer diet for prostate cancer
Eating one or more portions of broccoli every week can reduce the risk of prostate cancer, and the risk of localised cancer becoming more aggressive. For the first time, a research group at the Institute of Food Research led by Professor Richard Mithen has provided an explanation of how eating broccoli might reduce cancer risk based upon studies in men, as opposed to trying to extrapolate from animal models. Prostate cancer is the most........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 7/1/2008 8:36:28 PM)

Watermelon May Have Viagra-Effect

Watermelon May Have Viagra-Effect
A cold slice of watermelon has long been a Fourth of July holiday staple. But as per recent studies, the juicy fruit may be better suited for Valentine's Day. That's because researchers say watermelon has ingredients that deliver Viagra-like effects to the body's blood vessels and may even increase libido. "The more we study watermelons, the more we realize just how amazing a fruit it is in providing natural enhancers to the human body,"........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/30/2008 6:55:09 PM)

Device blocking stomach nerve signals shows promise in obesity

Device blocking stomach nerve signals shows promise in obesity
A new implantable medical device, developed in collaboration with Mayo Clinic researchers, shows promise as a reversible and less extreme alternative to existing bariatric surgeries, as per findings reported in the current issue of the journal Surgery In a six-month open label trial involving three medical centers in Australia, Mexico and Norway, the 31 obese participants who received the vagal nerve blocking device, also called VBLOCTM........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 6/26/2008 9:16:52 PM)

Feeling powerless leads to expensive purchases

Feeling powerless leads to expensive purchases
Feeling powerless can trigger strong desires to purchase products that convey high status, as per new research in the Journal of Consumer Research In a study that may explain why so a number of Americans who are deeply in debt still spend beyond their means, authors Derek D. Rucker and Adam D. Galinsky (both Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University) observed that research subjects who were asked to recall times when someone........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/25/2008 10:23:32 PM)

Risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease

Risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease
Scientists have discovered the second, strong genetic risk factor for developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease, as per a new report in the June 27th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication. The newly discovered gene, which previously had no known function, is predominantly active in a region of the brain that is hit early in the disease, where it acts as a channel for calcium, they show. Called calcium homeostasis modulator 1........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/25/2008 10:18:53 PM)

Pediatrics review of underage drinking

Pediatrics review of underage drinking
Underage drinking is a national concern that led the U.S. surgeon general to issue a "Call to Action to Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking" last year. Now, a new report by an Iowa State University researcher assesses the effectiveness of underage drinking prevention programs and provides a better idea of how to achieve key goals outlined by the surgeon general. Lead author Richard Spoth, director of the Partnerships in Prevention Science........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 6/25/2008 10:04:33 PM)

Morbid thoughts whet the appetite

Morbid thoughts whet the appetite
Can watching TV news or crime shows trigger overeating? As per new research in the Journal of Consumer Research, people who are thinking about their own deaths want to consume more. Authors Naomi Mandel (Arizona State University) and Dirk Smeesters (Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands) conducted several experiments in Europe and the United States where participants wrote essays on their feelings about their own deaths. They then........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 6/25/2008 9:58:32 PM)

Alzheimer's disease as a case of brake failure?

Alzheimer's disease as a case of brake failure?
Rutgers researcher Karl Herrup and his colleagues at Case Western Reserve University have discovered that a protein that suppresses cell division in brain cells effectively "puts the brakes" on the dementia that comes with Alzheimer's disease (AD). When the brakes fail, dementia results. This discovery could open the door to new ways of treating Alzheimer's disease, which affects up to half the population over the age of 85. Determining........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/24/2008 10:37:41 PM)

Savings help the medicine go down

Savings help the medicine go down
A new study of state-subsidized pharmacy assistance programs showed that providing prescription drug coverage for low-income seniors reduces Medicaid and Medicare costs. Moreover, needy seniors enrolled in the programs were able to cut their dose skimping and nursing home admissions in half, as per the Brandeis University research. In 2002, Illinois and Wisconsin implemented state pharmacy assistance programs with joint federal funding.........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/24/2008 10:15:11 PM)

Idle Computers Offer Hope

Idle Computers Offer Hope
A biomedical engineering professor at The University of Texas at Austin is using a concept called "grid computing" to allow the average person to donate idle computer time in a global effort to fight cancer. Muhammad Zaman, assistant professor in biomedical engineering, recently introduced Cellular Environment in Living Systems @Home or CELS@Home for short. The program already has more than 1,000 computer users worldwide contributing to the........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 6/23/2008 7:10:31 PM)

Weight-loss surgery can cut cancer risk

Weight-loss surgery can cut cancer risk
Successful bariatric surgery allows morbidly obese patients to lose up to 70 percent of their excess weight and to maintain weight loss. The latest study by Dr. Nicolas Christou of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) and McGill University shows that this surgery also decreases the risk of developing cancer by up to 80 percent. Dr. Christou presented his preliminary results yesterday at the 25th Annual Meeting of the American Society for........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/19/2008 10:18:49 PM)

Canadian physicians to become medical brokers

 Canadian physicians to become medical brokers
Health-care system constraints combined with a lack of a uniform referral process are leaving Ontario physicians brokering which patients are in greatest need of hip and knee replacement, a study led by a St. Michael's Hospital researcher funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research has revealed. The variability in this process means not everyone who needs this surgery will actually get surgery. "Findings from our study suggest........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/19/2008 9:03:07 PM)

Computers as safe as medical experts

Computers as safe as medical experts
The largest ever study into the administration of blood thinning drugs, principally Warfarin, has concluded that dosages calculated by computer are at least as safe and reliable as those provided by expert medical professionals. Increasing evidence of the value of these anticoagulant drugs in a wide range of clinical disorders such as abnormal heart rhythm, or atrial fibrillation, has led to a rapid rise in their use around the world. ........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/18/2008 9:06:13 PM)

Understanding Of Cell Behaviour In Breast Cancer

Understanding Of Cell Behaviour In Breast Cancer
The invasion and spread of cancer cells to other parts of the body, known as metastasis, is a principal cause of death in patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Eventhough patients with early stage, small, breast tumours have an excellent short term prognosis, more than 15 to 20 per cent of them will eventually develop distant metastases, and die from the disease. Vascular invasion - through lymphatic and blood vessels - is the major route for........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 6/18/2008 9:02:39 PM)

US could face shortage of 44,000 primary care physicians by 2025

US could face shortage of 44,000 primary care physicians by 2025
By 2025, the wait to see a doctor could get a lot longer if the current number of students training to be primary care physicians doesn't increase soon, as per a new University of Missouri study. Jack Colwill, professor emeritus of family and community medicine in the MU School of Medicine, and his research team observed that the U.S. could face a shortage of up to 44,000 family physicians and general internists in less than 20 years, due to a........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/17/2008 9:56:08 PM)

How safe are medical cannabinoids?

How safe are medical cannabinoids?
Wang and his colleagues performed a systematic review of safety studies of medical cannabinoids published over the past 40 years and observed that short-term use appeared to increase the risk of non-serious adverse events. Of all non-serious adverse events, dizziness was the most common (15.5%). "We observed that the rate of non-serious adverse events was 1.86 times higher among medical cannabinoid users than among controls," state the........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/16/2008 10:22:45 PM)

 

Violence declines with medication use

Violence declines with medication use
Some schizophrenia patients become less prone to violence when taking medication, but those with a history of childhood conduct problems continue to pose a higher risk even with therapy, as per a new study by scientists at Duke University Medical Center. "This is the first large randomized controlled study to compare the effectiveness of several commonly-prescribed medications for schizophrenia on reducing community violence," said Jeffrey........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/1/2008 9:41:06 PM)

Invasive treatment for certain coronary syndromes

Invasive treatment for certain coronary syndromes
An analysis of prior studies indicates that among men and high-risk women with a certain type of heart attack or angina an invasive therapy strategy (such as cardiac catheterization) is linked to reduced risk of rehospitalization, heart attack or death, whereas low-risk women may have an increased risk of heart attack or death with this therapy, as per an article in the July 2 issue of JAMA Eventhough an invasive strategy is frequently used........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/1/2008 9:31:46 PM)

Improving memory in Alzheimer's disease mice

Improving memory in Alzheimer's disease mice
Overactivation of proteins known as calpains, which are involved in memory formation, has been associated with Alzheimer disease. Ottavio Arancio and his colleagues, at Columbia University, New York, have now shown that two different drugs that inhibit calpains can improve memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease (APP/PS1 mice), leading them to suggest drugs that target calpains might stop or slow down the memory loss that occurs as........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/1/2008 9:27:42 PM)

15 human genomes each week

15 human genomes each week
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has sequenced the equivalent of 300 human genomes in just over six months. The Institute has just reached the staggering total of 1,000,000,000,000 letters of genetic code that will be read by scientists worldwide, helping them to understand the role of genes in health and disease. Researchers will be able to answer questions unthinkable even a few years ago and human medical genetics will be transformed. ........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 7/1/2008 8:43:08 PM)

The perils of overconfidence

The perils of overconfidence
Overestimating one's abilities can have hazardous consequences. The overconfident investment banker may lose millions on a "can't-miss" start up or a driver who's had one too a number of may insist on making it home in the car. Research has backed up this notion but with one glaring problem: It relies on participants to give accurate reports of their own confidence. But Pascal Mamassian, a researcher at CNRS and Universit Paris Descartes,........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/30/2008 6:59:49 PM)

Promising cancer drug target in prostate tumors

Promising cancer drug target in prostate tumors
Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute report they have blocked the development of prostate tumors in cancer-prone mice by knocking out a molecular unit they describe as a "powerhouse" that drives runaway cell growth. In an article that is being published recently as an advanced online publication by the journal Nature, the scientists say the growth-stimulating molecule called p110beta -- part of a cellular signaling network disrupted........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 6/26/2008 9:22:46 PM)

'No men allowed' in women's secret world

'No men allowed' in women's secret world
From the Petri dish in the controlled environment of a sterile laboratory to the faraway fields of another country, virtually anything can be the topic of scientific study. However, a University of Missouri religion professor observed that if the researcher is a male fieldworker studying women, the situation can be challenging. "The question of whether men can conduct field research on women ultimately will be determined by the quality and........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/26/2008 9:18:32 PM)

Higher Coffee Consumption: Lower Liver Cancer Risk

Higher Coffee Consumption: Lower Liver Cancer Risk
Higher Coffee Consumption Linked to Lower Liver Cancer Risk. Liver Cancer is the Third Most Common Global Cause of Cancer Death. A new large, prospective population-based study confirms an inverse relationship between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk. The study also observed that higher levels of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) in the blood were linked to an increased risk of developing the disease. These findings appear in the........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/26/2008 8:48:28 PM)

Hurried doctor visits may leave patients feeling forgetful

Hurried doctor visits may leave patients feeling forgetful
Have you ever been whisked through a doctor's visit, and afterward were unable to remember what the doctor said? A University of Rochester Medical Center study disclosed that doctors don't often take the steps necessary to help patients recall medical instructions. The study, published online in this month's Journal of General Internal Medicine, investigated how frequently physicians repeat themselves, write down information, summarize........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/25/2008 10:12:12 PM)

Stepfamilies make caring more complex

Stepfamilies make caring more complex
"I felt so insulted and so hurt. It was like [their father] had met some gal at a bar and married her the next day, and she wanted all his money. I felt they didn't give me any credit, or any respect, appreciation or anything. It still hurts."-Remarried wife of 12 years, caring for husband with Alzheimer's disease, about her adult stepchildren. ANN ARBOR, Mich.-Late-life remarriage complicates caring for an ailing spouse, as per a University........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/25/2008 10:09:38 PM)

Watch out for the wrong kind of sugar

Watch out for the wrong kind of sugar
WE KNOW about good and bad fats. Now suspicion is growing that not all sugars are created equal either. Overweight adults who consume large amounts of fructose have been found to experience alarming changes in body fat and insulin sensitivity that do not occur after eating glucose. Pure fructose is found in fresh fruit, fruit juice and preserves. But much of it sneaks into our diets though high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in soft drinks -........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 6/25/2008 10:01:45 PM)

Cheek Fat Compartments That Are Key To Youthful Appearance

Cheek Fat Compartments That Are Key To Youthful Appearance
Rejuvenating newly identified fat compartments in the facial cheeks can help reduce the hollowed look of the face as it ages, as per new research by plastic surgeons at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Scientists used special dyes to identify and map four cheek-fat compartments hidden deep beneath the skin. When these compartments are restored using fat, tissue fillers or artificial implants, the result is a more youthful and less hollow look........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/24/2008 10:22:07 PM)

Retinal hemorrhaging and motor vehicle crashes

Retinal hemorrhaging and motor vehicle crashes
The severity of retinal hemorrhaging for young children in motor vehicle crashes is closely corcorrelation to the severity of the crash, as per a new study by scientists at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Retinal hemorrhages occur when the blood vessels lining the retina rupture, resulting in bleeding onto the surface of the retina. The study, by Jane Kivlin, M.D., and Kenneth Simons, M.D., professors of ophthalmology at the........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 6/23/2008 7:16:13 PM)

Anticancer agents on patients with heart disease

Anticancer agents on patients with heart disease
A set of promising new anticancer agents could have unforeseen risks in individuals with heart disease, suggests research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The anticancer drugs which go by the strange name of hedgehog antagonists interfere with a biochemical process that promotes growth in some cancer cells. But the scientists showed that interfering with this biochemical process in mice with heart disease led to........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/23/2008 7:13:23 PM)

On the path to personalized medicine

On the path to personalized medicine
Medicine has moved a little bit closer to the era of tailor-made therapys, based on the unique genetic profiles of individual patients, as per recent research conducted by Dr Rima Rozen of the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI MUHC) at the Montreal Children's Hospital and McGill University. Her study, published June 18 in the journal Pharmacogenetics and Genomics, shows how minor genetic differences between........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/19/2008 10:20:50 PM)

Math could help cure leukemia

Math could help cure leukemia
When kids complain that math homework won't help them in real life, a new answer might be that math could help cure cancer. In a recent study that combined math and medicine, scientists have shown that patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) may be cured of the disease with an optimally timed cancer vaccine, where the timing is determined based on their own immune response. In the June 20 edition of the journal PLoS Computational........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/19/2008 10:16:56 PM)

Caesarean sections associated with risk of asthma

Caesarean sections associated with risk of asthma
Babies born by Caesarean section have a 50 % increased risk of developing asthma in comparison to babies born naturally. Emergency Caesarean sections increase the risk even further. This is shown in a new study based on data from 1.7 million births registered at the Medical Birth Registry at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. The goal of the study was to investigate the possible link between being born by Caesarean section and later........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 6/18/2008 9:08:46 PM)

Failure to bridle inflammation spurs atherosclerosis

Failure to bridle inflammation spurs atherosclerosis
When a person develops a sore or a boil, it erupts, drawing to it immune system cells that fight the infection. Then it resolves and flattens into the skin, often leaving behind a mark or a scar. A similar scenario plays out in the blood vessels. However, when there is a defect in the resolution response the ability of blood vessels to recover from inflammation atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries can result, said scientists at........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 6/18/2008 8:55:15 PM)

Inherited melanoma risk: What you do know?

Inherited melanoma risk: What you do know?
Salt Lake CityWhen people know the results of genetic tests confirming they have inherited an increased risk of developing melanoma, they follow skin cancer screening recommendations more proactivelymuch like those who have already been diagnosed with the potentially deadly disease, as per results of a study completed at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute. and reported in the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers &........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 6/17/2008 9:42:19 PM)

Red grape seeds in treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Red grape seeds in treatment of Alzheimer's disease
Mount Sinai scientists have discovered that polyphenolics derived from red grape seeds may be useful agents to prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). The new study entitled, "Grape derived polyphenolics prevent A oligomerization and attenuate cognitive deterioration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease," was published in The Journal of Neuroscience This new study explored the possibility of developing 'wine mimetic pills' that would........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/17/2008 8:57:28 PM)

 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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