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Combined antiviral and targeted chemotherapy

Combined antiviral and targeted chemotherapy
A discovery by a team of Canadian and American scientists could provide new ways to fight HIV-AIDS. As per a newly released study published in Nature Medicine, HIV-AIDS could be treated through a combination of targeted chemotherapy and current Highly Active Retroviral (HAART) therapys. This radical new treatment would make it possible to destroy both the viruses circulating in the body as well as those playing hide-and-seek in immune system........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 6/21/2009 8:44:54 PM)


How obesity increases the risk for diabetes

How obesity increases the risk for diabetes
Obesity is probably the most important factor in the development of insulin resistance, but science's understanding of the chain of events is still spotty. Now, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have filled in the gap and identified the missing link between the two. Their findings, to be reported in the June 21, 2009 advance online edition of the journal Nature, explain how obesity sets the stage for diabetes and why thin........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 6/21/2009 8:42:56 PM)


RNA snippet suppresses spread of aggressive breast cancer

RNA snippet suppresses spread of aggressive breast cancer
A low cellular level of a tiny fragment of RNA appears to increase the spread of breast cancer in mouse models of the disease, as per scientists at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Measuring levels of this so-called microRNA, which is also linked to metastatic breast cancer in humans, may more accurately predict the likelihood of metastasis (which accounts for 90% of cancer-related deaths) and ultimately help determine patient........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 6/16/2009 5:03:17 AM)


Why do we choose our mates?

Why do we choose our mates?
Charles Darwin wrote about it 150 years ago: animals don't pick their mates by pure chance it's a process that is deliberate and involves numerous factors. After decades of examining his work, experts agree that he pretty much scored a scientific bullseye, but a very big question is, "What have we learned since then?" asks a Texas A&M University biologist who has studied Darwin's theories. Adam Jones, an evolutional biologist who has........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/16/2009 4:56:44 AM)


Simple chemical system that mimics DNA

Simple chemical system that mimics DNA
A team of Scripps Research researchers has created a new analog to DNA that assembles and disassembles itself without the need for enzymes. Because the new system comprises components that might reasonably be expected in a primordial world, the new chemical system could answer questions about how life could emerge. The work, published in the June 11, 2009 issue of Science Express, an advance, online publication of the journal Science, might........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 6/12/2009 5:20:43 AM)


What causes multiple sclerosis?

What causes multiple sclerosis?
Over 100,000 people suffer from multiple sclerosis in Gera number of alone. Despite intensive research, the factors that trigger the disease and influence its progress remain unclear. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried and an international research team have succeeded in attaining three important new insights into the disease. It would appear that B cells play an unexpected role in the spontaneous........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/11/2009 5:15:20 AM)


Abnormal sleep pattern linked to weight gain

Abnormal sleep pattern linked to weight gain
Body Mass Index (BMI) varies as a function of habitual sleep duration, as per a research abstract that will be presented on Thursday, June 11, at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies. Results indicate that twins who slept between 7 and 8.9 hours each night had a lower mean BMI (25.0 kg/m2) in comparison to those who regularly slept either more (25.2 kg/m2) or less (26.4 kg/m2) per night. The........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 6/11/2009 5:06:25 AM)


Snoring pregnant women

Snoring pregnant women
If you are pregnant and your mate complains your frequent snoring is rattling the bedroom windows, you may have bigger problems than an annoyed, sleep-deprived partner. A newly released study from scientists at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine has observed that women who reported frequent snoring during their pregnancy were more likely to develop gestational diabetes -- a condition than can cause health problems for........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 6/11/2009 5:03:14 AM)


Now you can buy a kit to test for prostate cancer

Now you can buy a kit to test for prostate cancer
An over-the-counter prostate cancer test kit could be coming to a pharmacy near you, thanks to the collaborative work of a University of Central Florida chemist and M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando researchers. UCF's Qun "Treen" Huo and M.D. Anderson-Orlando's Dr. Cheryl Baker and Jimmie Colon teamed up about 18 months ago with a very ambitious plan. Huo wanted to develop an effective, inexpensive test to screen for prostate cancer that........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 6/10/2009 9:02:16 PM)


Diabetes patients should have regular exercise

Diabetes patients should have regular exercise
To reduce their cardiovascular risk, people with type 2 diabetes should do at least two-and-a-half hours per week of moderate-intensity or one-and-a-half hours per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercises, plus some weight training, as per an American Heart Association scientific statement published in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. The global increase in overweight and obesity has led to an "unprecedented........Go to the Diabetic news blog (Added on 6/9/2009 5:14:25 AM)


Computer-related injuries on the rise

Computer-related injuries on the rise
While back pain, blurred vision and mouse-related injuries are now well-documented hazards of long-term computer use, the number of acute injuries connected to computers is rising rapidly. As per a research studyreported in the July 2009 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, scientists from the Center for Injury Research and Policy and The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital; and The Ohio State University........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/9/2009 5:02:14 AM)


Crowded Emergency Departments and Patients with Heart Attacks

Crowded Emergency Departments and Patients with Heart Attacks
Patients with heart attacks and other forms of chest pain are three to five times more likely to experience serious complications after hospital admission when they are treated in a crowded emergency department (ED), as per a newly released study reported in the journal Academic Emergency Medicine. The authors say that this dramatic difference in rates of serious complications underscores the need for action on the part of hospital........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 6/5/2009 5:05:39 AM)


Risks of sharing personal genetic information online

Risks of sharing personal genetic information online
With just $399 and a bit of saliva in a cup, consumers can learn about their genetic risk for diseases from breast cancer to diabetes. Now, thanks to social networking sites set up by personal genomics companies, they can also share that information with family, friends and even strangers on the Internet. Bonding over a similar genetic background sounds relatively harmless. But as per bioethicists from the Stanford University School of........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 6/5/2009 4:44:01 AM)


Waiting times too long for bariatric surgery

Waiting times too long for bariatric surgery
Obesity is now acknowledged as a chronic disease with many related complications, and its prevalence has reached alarming epidemic proportions. While bariatric surgery is effective at treating the disease, access to this procedure is still too limited in Canada. The latest article published by Dr. Nicolas Christou, of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), in the recent issue of the Canadian Journal of Surgery assesses the waiting times........Go to the Gastric cancer blog (Added on 6/4/2009 3:29:16 AM)


Exercising while you have an aching back

Exercising while you have an aching back
People with lower back pain are better off exercising more, not less. A University of Alberta study of 240 men and women with chronic lower-back pain showed that those who exercised four days a week had a better quality of life, 28 per cent less pain and 36 per cent less disability, while those who hit the gym only two or three days a week did not show the same level of change. "While it could be assumed that someone with back pain should........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/3/2009 5:19:20 AM)


How the Brain Processes What the Eye Sees

How the Brain Processes What the Eye Sees
Scientists at the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience (CMBN) at Rutgers University in Newark have identified the need to develop a new framework for understanding "perceptual stability" and how we see the world with their discovery that visual input obtained during eye movements is being processed by the brain but blocked from awareness. The process of seeing requires the eyes to move so light can hit the photoreceptors at the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/3/2009 5:13:59 AM)


Skin Lesion Leads To More Cancer Types

Skin Lesion Leads To More Cancer Types
Actinic keratoses are sun-damaged rough patches or lesions on the skin - often pink and scaly - that doctors have long believed can turn into a form of skin cancer known as squamous cell carcinoma. Now scientists at Brown University, the Veterans Administration Medical Centers in Providence and Oklahoma City, and others have determined that actinic keratoses appear responsible for a larger spectrum of skin cancers than previously thought.........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 6/3/2009 5:06:02 AM)


Obesity Does Not Worsen Asthma

Obesity Does Not Worsen Asthma
Being overweight or obese does not make asthma worse in patients with mild and moderate forms of the disease, as per a research studyby National Jewish Health researchers, eventhough it may reduce the response to medications. "With both asthma and obesity on the rise in recent years, there has been much interest in the possible link between these two conditions," said main author E. Rand Sutherland, Associate Professor of Medicine at........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 6/3/2009 5:00:06 AM)


Genes, smoking and rheumatoid arthritis

Genes, smoking and rheumatoid arthritis
Recent genetic studies have revealed several new sites of genes that are risk factors for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The strongest association with anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive RA (ACPAs are autoantibodies detected in RA that are used as a major diagnostic tool) has been found for the HLA-DRB1 gene, and this site seems to play a central role in susceptibility to the disease in Caucasian populations. Prior........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 6/1/2009 7:07:48 PM)


Drug combination improves outcome for advanced non-small cell lung cancer

Drug combination improves outcome for advanced non-small cell lung cancer
A new, international study observed that the combination of two drugs delays disease progression for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results from the Phase III "ATLAS" trial were presented today by Dr. Vincent Miller of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. The goal of the study was to determine whether adding erlotinib (Tarceva), a targeted........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 6/1/2009 5:22:15 AM)


 

Dramatic outcomes in prostate cancer study

Dramatic outcomes in prostate cancer study
Two Mayo Clinic patients whose prostate cancer had been considered inoperable are now cancer free thanks in part to an experimental drug treatment that was used in combination with standardized hormone therapy and radiation treatment. The men were participating in a clinical trial of an immunotherapeutic agent called MDX-010 or ipilimumab. In these two cases, physicians say the approach initiated the death of a majority of cancer cells and........Go to the Prostate cancer news blog (Added on 6/21/2009 9:28:28 PM)


Statins don't lower risk of pneumonia

Statins don't lower risk of pneumonia
Taking popular cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, such as Lipitor (atorvastatin), does not lower the risk of pneumonia. That's the new finding from a study of more than 3,000 Group Health patients published online on June 16 in advance of the British Medical Journal's June 20 print issue. "Previous research based on automated claims data had raised some hopeand maybe some hypefor statins as a way to prevent and treat infections including........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 6/16/2009 9:38:17 PM)


Predicting Fatal Fungal Infections

Predicting Fatal Fungal Infections
As per a research findings published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have identified cells in blood that predict which HIV-positive individuals are most likely to develop deadly fungal meningitis, a major cause of HIV-related death. This form of meningitis affects more than 900,000 HIV-infected people globally-most of them in sub-Saharan Africa and other areas of........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 6/16/2009 5:06:18 AM)


Why smoking increases the risk of heart disease and strokes?

Why smoking increases the risk of heart disease and strokes?
Scientists at Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles and Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona have discovered a reason why smoking increases the risk of heart disease and strokes. The study, which will be presented Thursday, June 11 at The Endocrine Society's 91st annual meeting in Washington, D.C., observed that nicotine in cigarettes promotes insulin resistance, a pre-diabetic condition that raises blood........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 6/12/2009 5:24:19 AM)


Gene therapy technique for cancer by cutting off blood supply

Gene therapy technique for cancer by cutting off blood supply
University of Florida scientists have come up with a new gene treatment method to disrupt cancer growth by using a synthetic protein to induce blood clotting that cuts off a tumor's blood and nutrient supply. In mice implanted with human colorectal cancer cells, tumor volume decreased 53 percent and cancer cell growth slowed by 49 percent in those treated with a gene that encodes for the artificial protein, compared with those that were........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/12/2009 5:22:27 AM)


Fingerprints do not improve grip friction

Fingerprints do not improve grip friction
Fingerprints mark us out as individuals and leave telltale signs of our presence on every object that we touch, but what are fingerprints really for? As per Roland Ennos, from the University of Manchester, other primates and tree-climbing koalas have fingerprints and some South American monkeys have ridged pads on their tree-gripping tails, so everyone presumed that fingerprints are there to help us hang onto objects that we grasp. This theory........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/12/2009 5:19:34 AM)


Depressed mood may lead to premature birth

Depressed mood may lead to premature birth
Scientists trying to uncover why premature birth is a growing problem in the United States and one that disproportionately affects black women have observed that pre-pregnancy depressive mood may be a risk factor in preterm birth among both blacks and whites. Black women, however, have nearly two times the odds of having a preterm birth in comparison to white women, as per Amelia Gavin, a University of Washington assistant professor of........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 6/11/2009 5:11:05 AM)


Four new targets for breast cancer

Four new targets for breast cancer
Four suspects often found at the scene of the crime in cancer are guilty of the initiation and progression of breast cancer in mice that are resistant to the disease, a team led by researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reports in the June edition of Cancer Cell "We have a smoking gun" that shows it's no coincidence the three protein receptors and the enzyme that makes them are abnormally expressed in a number of........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/10/2009 9:46:27 PM)


HIV-1's 'hijacking mechanism

HIV-1's 'hijacking mechanism
Scientists at McGill University and the affiliated Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research at Montreal's Jewish General Hospital along with colleagues at the University of Manitoba and the University of British Columbia may have found a chink in the armour of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the microorganism which causes AIDS. They have pinpointed the key cellular machinery co-opted by HIV-1 to hijack the human cell for........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 6/10/2009 9:31:59 PM)


Tamoxifen resistance

Tamoxifen resistance
Tamoxifen is a widely used and highly successful drug in the treatment of breast cancer, though resistance to tamoxifen is still a concern in recurrent disease (affecting 25-35% of patients), since therapy resistant metastatic tumor cells are a major cause of death. In a study in this month's Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, researchers have uncovered a protein profile that may accurately predict whether a cancer will be tamoxifen resistant. ........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 6/10/2009 8:44:41 PM)


Dynamic stroma microenvironment in prostate cancer

Dynamic stroma microenvironment in prostate cancer
As stroma the supportive framework of the prostate gland react to prostate cancer, changes in the expression of genes occur that induce the formation of new structures such as blood vessels, nerves and parts of nerves, said scientists at Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears in the current issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research In this study, using special techniques and gene chips that allowed them to sample the........Go to the Prostate cancer news blog (Added on 6/9/2009 5:00:17 AM)


Fatal brain disease at work

Fatal brain disease at work
University of Florida researchers have discovered why a paralyzing brain disorder speeds along more rapidly in some patients than others a finding that may finally give scientists an entry point toward an effective therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, often referred to as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease. Of more than 100 possible mutations of a single gene inherited by people with familial ALS, the mutations most inclined to produce........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/8/2009 10:10:21 PM)


Pesticide Exposure and Parkinson's Disease

Pesticide Exposure and Parkinson's Disease
The cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most frequent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, is unknown, but in most cases it is believed to involve a combination of environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility. Laboratory studies in rats have shown that injecting the insecticide rotenone leads to an animal model of PD and several epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticides and PD, but........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/5/2009 5:03:10 AM)


Brain irradiation in lung cancer

Brain irradiation in lung cancer
A national Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study led by a Medical College of Wisconsin Cancer Center doctor at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee has observed that a course of radiation treatment to the brain after therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer reduced the risk of metastases to the brain within the first year after therapy. The study was presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 6/4/2009 3:33:53 AM)


Illness, medical bills linked to nearly two-thirds of bankruptcies

Illness, medical bills linked to nearly two-thirds of bankruptcies
Medical problems contributed to nearly two-thirds (62.1 percent) of all bankruptcies in 2007, as per a research studyin the recent issue of the American Journal of Medicine that will be published online Thursday. The data were collected previous to the current economic downturn and hence likely understate the current burden of financial suffering. Between 2001 and 2007, the proportion of all bankruptcies attributable to medical problems rose by........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/4/2009 3:22:11 AM)


Surgery in patients with RA

Surgery in patients with RA
A newly released study published by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons reveals that one of the most common conditions caused by Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is best treated surgically, sooner rather than later. Patients with RA frequently experience a debilitating condition known as metacarpophalangeal joint disease, which is commonly treated by replacing the knuckle joints with solid silicone joints. However, this therapy (and others like........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 6/3/2009 5:11:49 AM)


Efforts to quickly develop swine flu vaccine

Efforts to quickly develop swine flu vaccine
Researchers around the world are accelerating their efforts to develop a vaccine against the H1N1 influenza virus (Swine flu) as rapidly as possible, reports Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN). The need for such a vaccine received a strong impetus from the World Health Organization, which has issued a Phase 5 pandemic alert, a strong signal that the WHO believes a pandemic is imminent, as per the June 1 issue of GEN........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 6/3/2009 5:08:07 AM)


Oxygen plus MRI to determine cancer therapy success

Oxygen plus MRI to determine cancer therapy success
A simple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test involving breathing oxygen might help oncologists determine the best therapy for some cancer patients, report scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Previous research has shown that the amount of oxygen present in a tumor can be a predictor of how well a patient will respond to therapy. Tumors with little oxygen tend to grow stronger and resist both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Until........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/3/2009 4:58:19 AM)


Tai chi helps to improves arthritis pain

Tai chi helps to improves arthritis pain
The results of a new analysis have provided strong evidence to suggest that Tai Chi is beneficial for arthritis. Specifically, it was shown to decrease pain with trends towards improving overall physical health, level of tension and satisfaction with health status. Musculoskeletal pain, such as that experienced by people with arthritis, places a severe burden on the patient and community and is recognized as an international health priority.........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 6/1/2009 7:00:03 PM)


Surgery for late-stage colon cancer

Surgery for late-stage colon cancer
A newly released study shows that a great majority of patients who present with advanced colorectal cancer that has spread to other organs (stage IV) don't require immediate surgery to remove the primary tumor in the colon. Scientists from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) presented their data today at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. "For this population with metastatic disease that cannot be cured by........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 6/1/2009 5:18:53 AM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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