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Predicting response to melanoma treatment

Predicting response to melanoma treatment
Genes that help predict a melanoma patient's response to therapy. The new findings are being presented at the 45th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), May 29 to June 2, in Orlando, Fla. "Approximately 70,000 people will be diagnosed with metastatic melanoma this year," said principal investigator Hussein Tawbi, M.D., M.Sc., assistant professor of medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and with........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 6/1/2009 5:16:59 AM)


Stem cell-gene therapy approach cures human genetic disease

Stem cell-gene therapy approach cures human genetic disease
A study led by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, has catapulted the field of regenerative medicine significantly forward, proving in principle that a human genetic disease can be cured using a combination of gene treatment and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology. The study, reported in the May 31, 2009 early online edition of Nature, is a major milestone on the path from the laboratory to the clinic. "It's........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 6/1/2009 5:07:30 AM)


drug combination safe and active in kidney cancer

drug combination safe and active in kidney cancer
Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers report that a two-drug blockade of mTOR signaling appears safe in metastatic kidney cancer in a phase I trial. Early data suggests that a combination of temsirolimus and bryostatin appears to be active in patients with rare forms of renal cell cancer, which are less likely to respond to other targeted therapies. Elizabeth Plimack, M.D., M.S., a medical oncologist and attending doctor at Fox Chase will........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/1/2009 5:04:15 AM)


Obesity predicts inadequate bowel prep at colonoscopy

Obesity predicts inadequate bowel prep at colonoscopy
Obesity is an independent predictor of inadequate bowel preparation at colonoscopy, and the presence of additional risk factors further increases the likelihood of a poorly cleansed colon, as per a newly released study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute. Obesity has become an epidemic in the present era, both in the U.S. and in other developed........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 6/1/2009 5:00:41 AM)


Risks of Dementia drug treatment

Risks of Dementia drug treatment
Side effects linked to several commonly-prescribed dementia drugs appears to be putting elderly Canadians at risk, says Queen's University Geriatrics professor Sudeep Gill. Cholinesterase inhibitors (Aricept, Exelon and Reminyl) are often prescribed for people with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias because they increase the level of a chemical in the brain that seems to help memory. Eventhough such drugs are known to provoke slower........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 5/27/2009 9:12:50 PM)


Can we afford the cancer care of the future?

Can we afford the cancer care of the future?
When a cancer patient and his or her doctor discuss the value of a therapy option, the conversation commonly centers on a consideration of the therapy's medical benefits versus its possible side effects for the patient. Increasingly, however, as the already high costs of cancer care continue to rise, a full view of the patient's welfare must also take into account the economic impact of the therapy on the patient and his or her family. ........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 5/26/2009 6:50:52 PM)


Youth baseball-related injuries down 25 percent

Youth baseball-related injuries down 25 percent
Spring marks baseball season for more than 19 million children and adolescents who play each year as part of a team or in backyards throughout the United States. The good news for these players is that the number of injuries from the sport is on the decline. A newly released study by the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital observed that the number of children and adolescents treated........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 5/26/2009 6:32:56 PM)


Interpreting head movements

Interpreting head movements
May 21, 2009 It is well known that people use head motion during conversation to convey a range of meanings and emotions, and that women use more active head motion when conversing with each other than men use when they talk with each other. When women and men converse together, the men use a little more head motion and the women use a little less. But the men and women might be adapting because of their gender-based expectations or because........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 5/24/2009 8:46:09 PM)


How superbugs control their lethal weapons

How superbugs control their lethal weapons
It appears that some superbugs have evolved to develop the ability to manipulate the immune system to everyone's advantage. A team of scientists at The University of Western Ontario, led by Joaquin (Quim) Madrenas of the Robarts Research Institute, has discovered some processes that reduce the lethal effects of toxins from superbugs, allowing humans and microbes to co-evolve. This discovery may lead to novel alternatives to antibiotics that........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 5/24/2009 8:41:31 PM)


Identifying Alzheimers disease early

Identifying Alzheimers disease early
Analyzing MRI studies of the brain with software developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) may allow diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and of mild cognitive impairment, a lesser form of dementia that precedes the development of Alzheimer's by several years. In their report that will appear in the journal Brain and has been released online, the MGH/Martinos team show how their software........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 5/22/2009 5:13:01 AM)


African-American women with advanced breast cancer

African-American women with advanced breast cancer
A newly released study finds that nearly one in four African American women with late stage breast cancer refused chemotherapy and radiation treatment, potentially life saving therapies. Reported in the July 1, 2009 issue of CANCER, a peer-evaluated journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that more efforts are needed to ensure that all women with breast cancer receive appropriate care. In the United States, African........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 5/22/2009 5:03:54 AM)


Low vitamin D cancer link

Low vitamin D cancer link
In studying the preventive effects of vitamin D, scientists at the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego, have proposed a new model of cancer development that hinges on a loss of cancer cells' ability to stick together. The model, dubbed DINOMIT, differs substantially from the current model of cancer development, which suggests genetic mutations as the earliest driving forces behind cancer. "The first event in........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 5/22/2009 5:02:21 AM)


Risk of Gestational diabetes

Risk of Gestational diabetes
Gestational diabetes happens in more than three per cent of pregnancies in Ontario. Commonly the condition resolves itself after delivery, but a number of studies have shown that these women are at a very high risk for developing "regular" type 2 diabetes during the later part of life. New research out of the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) has observed that even women with mild abnormalities in their blood sugar during........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 5/20/2009 6:54:39 PM)


How influenza virus to evade the body's immune response

How influenza virus to evade the body's immune response
Scientists at the University of Southern California (USC) have identified a critical molecular mechanism that allows the influenza virus to evade the body's immune response system. The study would be reported in the May 21 issue of the journal Cell Host & Microbe "We have found a mechanism that the influenza virus uses to inhibit the body's immune response that emphasizes the vital role of a certain protein in defending against........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 5/20/2009 6:28:49 PM)


Satiation solution

Satiation solution
Have you ever gotten sick of pizza, playing the same computer game, or had a song stuck in your head for so long you never wanted to hear it again? If you have, you may suffer from variety amnesia. In new research, Joseph Redden, professor of marketing at the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management, may have found a cure for your satiation blues. "People forget about the abundance of different experiences they have had and tend........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 5/20/2009 5:23:16 AM)


Predicting breast cancer outcome

Predicting breast cancer outcome
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center scientists have uncovered a gene signature that may help predict clinical outcomes in certain types of breast cancer. In the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Harold (Hal) Moses, M.D., and his colleagues report that this gene signature which is linked to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway correlates with reduced relapse-free survival in breast cancer patients, particularly in........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 5/20/2009 5:11:04 AM)


Computer Model Predicts Brain Tumor Growth

Computer Model Predicts Brain Tumor Growth
Scientists from Brown University and other institutions have developed a computational computer model of how brain tumors grow and evolve. The model is the product mathematical formulas based on the first principals of physics, such as conservation of mass, and it has allowed scientists to recreate tumor growth in a computer. Through subsequent repetitive testing against real tumors, they have also linked their computerized tumors to........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 5/19/2009 5:25:25 AM)


Workplace: sit less and eat better

Workplace: sit less and eat better
An e-mail intervention program is an effective way to significantly improve diet and physical activity by helping people move more, sit less, and make healthier food choices, as per a Kaiser Permanente Division of Research study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine The study was a randomized controlled trial of the ALIVE (A Lifestyle Intervention Via E-mail) program conducted among 787 Kaiser Permanente Northern California........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 5/19/2009 5:04:19 AM)


DNA patterns of cancer and genetic disorders

DNA patterns of cancer and genetic disorders
A new tool will help scientists identify the minute changes in DNA patterns that lead to cancer, Huntington's disease and a host of other inherited disorders. The tool was developed at North Carolina State University and translates DNA sequences into graphic images, which allows scientists to distinguish genetic patterns more quickly and efficiently than was historically possible using computers. David Cox, a Ph.D. student in computer........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 5/19/2009 5:02:23 AM)


Possible breakthrough drug in lung cancer

Possible breakthrough drug in lung cancer
Interim Phase II data from the LUX-Lung 2 study suggest BIBW 2992 has anti-tumor activity in advanced, second-line, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. "Lung cancer kills more people than any other cancer.3 The LUX-Lung 1 and 2 studies represent an opportunity to investigate BIBW 2992 across a range of different patient populations," said Dr. Manfred Haehl, corporate senior........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 5/15/2009 5:02:40 PM)


 

Individualized treatment for heart failure

Individualized treatment for heart failure
Telemonitoring systems, by which the symptoms of heart failure can be remotely assessed, now provide a strategy for the improved personalised care of patients, as per Professor John Cleland from the University of Hull, UK.1 He told Heart Failure Congress 2009 that the management of heart failure is complex but most effective when tailored to the individual patients' needs and condition.2 "Unfortunately," he added, "the resources mandatory to........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 6/1/2009 5:12:59 AM)


Obesity and diabetes double risk of HF

Obesity and diabetes double risk of HF
The twin epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes will continue to fuel an explosion in heart failure, already the world's most prevalent chronic cardiovascular disease, as per John McMurray, professor of cardiology at the Western Infirmary, Glasgow, and President of the Heart Failure Association. He reported that around one-third of patients with heart failure have evidence of diabetes, and for them the outlook is very serious. For doctors, he........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 6/1/2009 5:10:12 AM)


Genetic risk factor for testicular cancer

Genetic risk factor for testicular cancer
(PHILADELPHIA) Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have uncovered variation around two genes that are linked to an increased risk of testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among young men, and its incidence among non-Hispanic Caucasian men has doubled in the last 40 years -- it now affects seven out of 100,000 white men in the United States each year. The discovery, reported in the May 31,........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/1/2009 5:05:27 AM)


Longer high-stakes tests may result in a sense of mental fatigue

Longer high-stakes tests may result in a sense of mental fatigue
Spending hours taking a high-pressure aptitude test may make people feel mentally fatigued, but that fatigue doesn't necessarily lead to lower test scores, as per new research published by the American Psychological Association. If anything, performance might actually improve on a longer test, the study found. "The experience of fatigue during testing does not appear to be, in and of itself, detrimental to test performance," said co-authors........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/1/2009 4:55:38 AM)


New cellular targets for HIV drug development

New cellular targets for HIV drug development
Focusing HIV drug development on immune cells called macrophages instead of traditionally targeted T cells could bring us closer to eradicating the disease, as per new research from University of Florida and five other institutions. In the largest study of its kind, scientists observed that in diseased cells such as cancer cells that are also infected with HIV, almost all the virus was packed into macrophages, whose job is to "eat"........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 5/27/2009 9:08:17 PM)


The evolution of migraine

The evolution of migraine
Patients living with migraine have strong reason for new optimism concerning a positive future. Two review articles and an accompanying editorial, "The Future of Migraine: Beyond Just Another Pill," in the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, are the basis for an ironic premise. "Migraine is a potentially chronic, progressive disease that substantially affects patients, families, workplaces, and society," as per the editorial written by........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 5/26/2009 6:34:49 PM)


pioglitazone against multiple sclerosis

pioglitazone against multiple sclerosis
A drug currently FDA-approved for use in diabetes shows some protective effects in the brains of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine report in a study currently available online in the Journal of Neuroimmunology In a small, double-blinded clinical trial, patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis were assigned to take pioglitazone (a drug........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 5/26/2009 6:30:36 PM)


Opposites attract: how genetics influences humans

Opposites attract: how genetics influences humans
New light has been thrown on how humans choose their partners, a scientist will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today (Monday May 25). Professor Maria da Graa Bicalho, head of the Immunogenetics and Histocompatibility Laboratory at the University of Parana, Brazil, says that her research had shown that people with diverse major histocompatibility complexes (MHCs) were more likely to choose each other as........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 5/24/2009 8:47:41 PM)


People by nature are universally optimistic

People by nature are universally optimistic
Despite calamities from economic recessions, wars and famine to a flu epidemic afflicting the Earth, a newly released study from the University of Kansas and Gallup indicates that humans are by nature optimistic. The study, to be presented Sunday, May 24, 2009, at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science in San Francisco, found optimism to be universal and borderless. Data from the Gallup World Poll drove the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 5/24/2009 8:43:24 PM)


Younger men with advanced prostate cancer

Younger men with advanced prostate cancer
While young men with prostate cancer have a low risk of dying early, those with advanced forms of cancer do not live as long as older men with similar forms of the disease. That is the conclusion of a newly released study reported in the July 1, 2009 issue of CANCER, a peer-evaluated journal of the American Cancer Society. The paradoxical findings indicate that there appears to be biological differences between prostate cancers that develop in........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 5/22/2009 5:06:19 AM)


More than a bad night's sleep

More than a bad night's sleep
Sleep apnea has long been known to be linked to obesity. But a newly released study reported in the recent issue of Diabetes Care finds that the disorder is widely undiagnosed among obese individuals with type 2 diabetes nearly 87 percent of participants reported symptoms, but were never diagnosed. For those with untreated sleep apnea, it doesn't just mean their sleep is disrupted; existing research shows that it can also mean an increased........Go to the Diabetic news blog (Added on 5/21/2009 6:04:15 AM)


Mother-infant psychotherapy

Mother-infant psychotherapy
Psychotherapists who treat mothers suffering from postpartum depression and other mood disorders with their infants have developed a proven process that contributes to a greater positive experience with immediate insights for the mothers to develop healthy connections between their maternal experiences and their infants' behaviors. Given the documented detrimental effects of postpartum depression on infants and the mother-infant........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 5/20/2009 7:39:34 PM)


Masks Effective in Influenza Prevention

Masks Effective in Influenza Prevention
A new article in the journal Risk Analysis assessed various ways in which aerosol transmission of the flu, a central mode of diffusion which involves breathing droplets in the air, can be reduced. Results show that face protection is a key infection control measure for influenza and can thus affect how people should try to protect themselves from the swine flu. Lawrence M. Wein, Ph.D., and Michael P. Atkinson of Stanford University........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 5/20/2009 6:33:45 PM)


Post menopausal hormone replacement and breast cancer

Post menopausal hormone replacement and breast cancer
The risk of developing breast cancer due to taking hormone replacement treatment may be the same for women with a family history of the disease and without a family history, a University of Rochester Medical Center study concluded. The study, published online this week in the journal Epidemiology, adds to the evolving picture of what factors, either alone or in combination, boost breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women. It also refutes........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 5/20/2009 5:21:49 AM)


Clues to HIV

Clues to HIV
Rice University's Andrew Barron and his group, working with labs in Italy, Gera number of and Greece, have identified specific molecules that could block the means by which the deadly virus spreads by taking away its ability to bind with other proteins. Using computer simulations, scientists tested more than 100 carbon fullerene, or C-60, derivatives initially developed at Rice for other purposes to see if they could be used to inhibit a........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 5/20/2009 5:14:30 AM)


A new way of treating the flu

A new way of treating the flu
What happens if the next big influenza mutation proves resistant to the available anti-viral drugs? This question is presenting itself right now to researchers and health officials this week at the World Health Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland, as they continue to do battle with H1N1, the so-called swine flu, and prepare for the next iteration of the ever-changing flu virus. Promising new research announced by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 5/20/2009 5:09:16 AM)


Triglycerides implicated in diabetes nerve loss

Triglycerides implicated in diabetes nerve loss
ANN ARBOR, Mich. A common blood test for triglycerides a well-known cardiovascular disease risk factor may also for the first time allow doctors to predict which patients with diabetes are more likely to develop the serious, common complication of neuropathy. In a study now online in the journal Diabetes, University of Michigan and Wayne State University scientists analyzed data from 427 diabetes patients with neuropathy, a condition in........Go to the Diabetes-watch-blog (Added on 5/19/2009 5:21:01 AM)


Lettuce gets a healthy suntan

Lettuce gets a healthy suntan
Salad dressing aside, a pile of spinach has more nutritional value than a wedge of iceberg lettuce. That's because darker colors in leafy vegetables are often signs of antioxidants that are thought to have a variety of health benefits. Now a team of plant physiologists has developed a way to make lettuce darker and redderand therefore healthierusing ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Steven Britz of the U.S. Department of Agriculture........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 5/19/2009 5:19:29 AM)


Genetic links to age of first menstrual period and menopause

Genetic links to age of first menstrual period and menopause
Newly identified gene variants linked to the age at which females experience their first menstrual period and the onset of menopause may help shed light on the prevention of breast and endometrial cancer, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease. In a newly released study, scientists from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 5/18/2009 5:30:06 AM)


The future of personalized cancer treatment

The future of personalized cancer treatment
In technology that promises to one day allow drug delivery to be tailored to an individual patient and a particular cancer tumor, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, have developed an efficient system for delivering siRNA into primary cells. The work would be reported in the May 17 in the advance on-line edition of Nature Biotechnology "RNAi has an unbelievable potential to manage cancer and treat it,"........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 5/18/2009 5:25:09 AM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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