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Predicting Danger of Flu Pandemic

Predicting Danger of Flu Pandemic
Researchers studying the potential spread of a flu pandemic must be careful to distinguish the different rates of infection among different groups, including the sociable and the shy, those most susceptible to infection and those less so, as per a new study in the "O.R. Forum" section of Operations Research, a flagship journal of The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®). In the study, "Simple Models of........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 6/19/2007 5:02:33 AM)

Fat fish put obesity on the hook

Fat fish put obesity on the hook
Everyone knows that eating lean fish helps slim waistlines, but scientists from the Center for the Study of Weight Regulation and Associated Disorders at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, OR, have found a new way fish can help eliminate obesity. In a study would be reported in the July 2007 print issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists describe the first genetic model of obesity in a fish. Having this model should greatly........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 6/18/2007 9:41:10 PM)

Stress And The Development Of Alzheimer Tangles

Stress And The Development Of Alzheimer Tangles
Subjecting mice to repeated emotional stress, the kind we experience in everyday life, may contribute to the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimers disease, report scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. While aging is still the greatest risk factor for Alzheimers disease, many studies have pointed to stress as a contributing factor. A long-term study of about 800 members of religious........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 6/15/2007 12:50:39 PM)

How Insomnia Affects Job Performance And Safety

How Insomnia Affects Job Performance And Safety
Minneapolis, MN -- June 15, 2007 -- Alertness Solutions presented results of a new survey this week at the annual SLEEP meeting showing the significant impact our 24/7 culture is having on healthcare professionals job performance and patient safety. The survey of 2,082 nurses observed that more than one quarter of nurses (27.23%) suffered from insomnia; 32.10% had difficulty staying asleep, 12.52% had trouble falling asleep, and 55.38%........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/15/2007 12:22:44 PM)

Childhood Lead Poisonings Continue Downward Trend

Childhood Lead Poisonings Continue Downward Trend
Eventhough childhood lead poisoning remains a serious problem, the number of new cases identified in 2006 marks the lowest level in more than a decade. The number of new cases identified in 2006 - 2,310 among children ages 6 months to 6 years - marks a 13% decline from 2005 and an 88% decline since 1995, when nearly 20,000 children were newly identified with lead poisoning. Lead poisoning is defined as a blood-lead level greater than or equal........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 6/15/2007 11:10:03 AM)

Infectious diseases experts issue warnings

Infectious diseases experts issue warnings
New vaccines are available to make significant gains against cervical cancer deaths and debilitating pain from shingles, but infectious diseases experts warn that their full potential will not be realized without changes in the way vaccines for adults and adolescents are promoted, financed, and delivered in the United States. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) has released a new blueprint for action to prevent tens of........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 6/15/2007 11:06:04 AM)

Warning Signs Of Ovarian Cancer

Warning Signs Of Ovarian Cancer
Cancer experts have identified a set of health problems that may be symptoms of ovary cancer, and they are urging women who have the symptoms for more than a few weeks to see their doctors. The new advice is the first official recognition that the disease, long believed to give no warning until it was far advanced, does cause symptoms at earlier stages in a number of women. The symptoms to watch out for are bloating, pelvic or abdominal........Go to the Ovarian cancer blog (Added on 6/13/2007 1:05:41 PM)

Simple steps make breast cancer survivors eager to exercise

Simple steps make breast cancer survivors eager to exercise
Simple steps, like giving breast cancer survivors an exercise workbook or step pedometer, can improve their quality of life and fatigue levels. In research published this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, University of Alberta scientists observed that those simple steps, along with a recommendation to exercise, helped breast cancer survivors exercise more than survivors who were only given a recommendation to exercise. More activity........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 6/13/2007 12:32:46 PM)

Looking Forward To Asbestos Ban

Looking Forward To Asbestos Ban
A deal is near on legislation banning the use of asbestos, a fibrous mineral often used in brake linings, gaskets, cement products and even yarns and threads imported into the country despite its deadly health risks. Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., a leading advocate of the ban, and Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., said Tuesday that they are within a week or two of wrapping up a compromise that also would authorize $50 million in research to combat........Go to the Mesothelioma blog (Added on 6/13/2007 12:17:01 PM)

Problem-based learning in pharmacology

Problem-based learning in pharmacology
Irrational use of medicines is a major problem all over the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) and a number of other bodies are concentrating on improving the use of medicines. Problem-based teaching of Pharmacology and Therapeutics to undergraduate medical students has been recognized as a key intervention to improve the use of medicines. Personal or P-drugs are important for medical students, doctors in training and prescribers.........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/13/2007 12:12:28 PM)

Easing out of work

Easing out of work
When Bob Willis thought about retiring, he knew just how he wanted to do it. Slowly. Or maybe never. Since 1995 Willis, 66, a University of Michigan economist, has directed the enormous Health and Retirement Study conducted by the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR) and funded by the National Institute on Aging. One of the largest and most ambitious social science research projects in the world, the study surveys a nationally........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/13/2007 8:13:35 AM)

Poor sleep hygiene in children

Poor sleep hygiene in children
A research abstract that will be presented Wednesday at SLEEP 2007, the 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS) finds that a snoring child's poor sleep hygiene habits can have a negative influence on his or her daytime behavior. Lisa Witcher of the University of Louisville, who authored the study, interviewed the parents of 52 children between the ages of five and eight who were reported to snore........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/13/2007 7:54:11 AM)

Distress-prone people and memory problems

Distress-prone people and memory problems
People who are easily distressed and have more negative emotions are more likely to develop memory problems than more easygoing people, as per a research studyreported in the June 12, 2007, issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. In the study, those who most often experience negative emotions such as depression and anxiety were 40 percent more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment than those who........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/12/2007 5:08:01 AM)

Sensitivity to diverse range of chemotherapeutic drugs

Sensitivity to diverse range of chemotherapeutic drugs
Using a functional genomic screen, researchers have defined elements that impact the responsiveness of cancer cells to drugs usually used as anticancer therapeutics. The research, reported in the recent issue of the journal Cancer Cell, published by Cell Press, identifies individual genes that are linked to resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and sets the stage for future studies that may significantly enhance the ability to predict whether or........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/12/2007 5:03:45 AM)

Sleep disorders highly prevalent among police officers

Sleep disorders highly prevalent among police officers
Sleep disorders are common, costly and treatable, but often remain undiagnosed and untreated. Unrecognized sleep disorders adversely affect personal health and may lead to chronic sleep loss, which, in turn, increases the risk of accidents and injuries. These problems are exacerbated in shift workers such as police officers, who may experience chronic sleep loss due to their schedules. A sampling of police officers shows a high occurence........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/12/2007 4:56:00 AM)

Hot Flashes With Breast Cancer Treatment

Hot Flashes With Breast Cancer Treatment
Women on tamoxifen treatment who reported having hot flashes were less likely to develop recurrent breast cancer than those who did not report hot flashes, as per a research studyfrom the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Moreover, hot flashes were a stronger predictor of outcome than age, hormone receptor status or even how advanced the breast cancer was at diagnosis. The study results were published........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 6/11/2007 4:05:59 PM)

Potential New Target For Type 2 Diabetes

Potential New Target For Type 2 Diabetes
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered a potential new target for treating type 2 diabetes, as per a new study that appeared online this week in Nature. The target is a protein, along with its molecular partner, that regulates fat metabolism. "Over the last 10 years, we have begun to understand the importance of fat metabolism in diabetes," notes lead author Morris J. Birnbaum, MD, PhD, the Willard........Go to the Diabetes-watch-blog (Added on 6/10/2007 8:56:12 PM)

Early identification of at-risk readers

Early identification of at-risk readers
Taken together, functional brain scans and tests of reading skills strongly predict which children will have ongoing reading problems. Whats more, the two methods work better together than either one alone, as per new research in the recent issue of Behavioral Neuroscience, which is published by the American Psychological Association (APA). Neuroresearchers at Stanford and Carnegie Mellon universities think this double-barreled diagnostic........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 6/10/2007 7:33:27 PM)

Drug may halt Parkinson's disease

Drug may halt Parkinson's disease
Northwestern University scientists have discovered a drug that slows and may even halt the progression of Parkinsons disease. The drug rejuvenates aging dopamine cells, whose death in the brain causes the symptoms of this devastating and widespread disease. D. James Surmeier, the Nathan Smith Davis Professor and chair of physiology at Northwestern Universitys Feinberg School of Medicine, and his team of scientists have observed that........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/10/2007 7:26:45 PM)

Stroke study sheds light on left-right brain divide

Stroke study sheds light on left-right brain divide
Research into the effects of strokes has furthered our understanding of the different roles of the left and right sides of our brains. A study led by the University of Exeter has highlighted differences in the ability of people to perform basic tasks, depending on whether the left or right sides of their brains have been damaged by a stroke. The research identified the role of the right side of the brain in noticing and correcting errors. ........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/10/2007 7:23:42 PM)

 

Bacterial pneumonia patients at increased risk of major heart problems

Bacterial pneumonia patients at increased risk of major heart problems
A new study suggests patients hospitalized with pneumonia may be at serious risk of new or worsening heart problems. The study is reported in the July 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, currently available online. Scientists led by Daniel Musher, MD, studied the records of all 170 patients hospitalized with pneumococcal pneumonia at a Texas Veterans Affairs medical center from 2001 to 2005. They observed that 19.4 percent of them had........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 6/19/2007 5:05:00 AM)

Link Between Foie Gras And Disease

Link Between Foie Gras And Disease
University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine professor and researcher Alan Solomon, M.D., director of the Human Immunology and Cancer/Alzheimers Disease and Amyloid-Related Disorders Research Program, led a team that discovered a link between foie gras prepared from goose or duck liver and the type of amyloid found in rheumatoid arthritis or tuberculosis. Their experimental data, appearing in this week's edition of the Proceedings of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/18/2007 9:38:17 PM)

When to turn breech babies

When to turn breech babies
An international study led by a McMaster researcher aims to determine if a manual procedure to turn breech babies in the uterus can result in fewer births by caesarean section. The clinical trial, led by Eileen Hutton, assistant dean of midwifery at McMaster, is examining whether attempting to turn breech babies earlier in a pregnancy than the current practice will mean a higher success rate for the procedure, and ultimately fewer........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 6/15/2007 12:56:57 PM)

Breast Feeding Protects From Rheumatoid Arthritis

Breast Feeding Protects From Rheumatoid Arthritis
Breast feeding for a period of thirteen months or more has been shown to reduce the mothers the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as per new data presented today at EULAR 2007, the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology in Barcelona, Spain. In the study, the longer the breast feeding period, the lower the mothers risk of developing RA in later life. Comparable use of oral contraceptives (OCs) or hormone replacement treatment........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 6/15/2007 11:23:57 AM)

Ris Factors For Rheumatoid Arthritis

Ris Factors For Rheumatoid Arthritis
Barcelona, Spain, Friday 15 June 2007: New data presented today at EULAR 2007, the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology in Barcelona, Spain, sheds light on the role of environmental and genetic risk factors in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Two new studies by a team in Sweden have identified smoking, a low formal level of education and certain metabolic indicators as important risk factors in the development of RA. These........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 6/15/2007 11:12:47 AM)

Mechanism Of Action Used By Sorafenib

Mechanism Of Action Used By Sorafenib
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center scientists have uncovered a new mechanism of action of the anti-cancer drug sorafenib, which could stimulate the development of novel regimens in which it is combined with other molecularly targeted agents for patients with blood cancers and solid tumors. In the new study, led by Steven Grant, M.D., Massey's associate director for translational research and co-leader of the cancer........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 6/13/2007 1:33:48 PM)

Lung and bladder cancer after arsenic exposure

Lung and bladder cancer after arsenic exposure
Arsenic exposure appears to continue causing lung and bladder cancer deaths years after exposure ends, as per a research studypublished online June 12 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Arsenic is a known cause of lung and bladder cancer, but scientists dont yet know how long cancer risk remains elevated after arsenic exposure. The drinking water in a region of northern Chile became contaminated with very high amounts of arsenic........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 6/13/2007 1:30:05 PM)

Women well informed about breast cancer

Women well informed about breast cancer
As per a new GfK Roper Public Affairs survey sponsored by CancerCare, a national nonprofit cancer support organization, while the majority (76 percent) of women surveyed said they know at least a fair amount about breast cancer, a number of remain unaware of the important recent progress made in therapy. Fewer than one out of four (23 percent) women ages 50-65 have heard of new therapies for breast cancer, revealing a gap between awareness and........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 6/13/2007 12:43:33 PM)

Links Between Taconite And Mesothelioma

Links Between Taconite And Mesothelioma
The Minnesota Department of Health is launching two major studies to answer long-simmering questions about taconite and human health. The agency says men in northeastern Minnesota have twice the expected rate of a rare form of cancer called mesothelioma. It's caused by asbestos, but the Health Department wants to find out whether it can also be caused by fibers in the taconite on the Iron Range. Duluth, Minn. - Mining, and processing........Go to the Mesothelioma blog (Added on 6/13/2007 12:26:42 PM)

Neural stem cells reduce Parkinson's symptoms

Neural stem cells reduce Parkinson's symptoms
New Haven, Conn.Primates with severe Parkinsons disease were able to walk, move, and eat better, and had diminished tremors after being injected with human neural stem cells, a research team from Yale, Harvard, the University of Colorado, and the Burnham Institute report today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. These results are promising, but it will be years before it is known whether a similar procedure would have........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/13/2007 10:00:51 AM)

Disability from long-term rheumatoid arthritis reduced

Disability from long-term rheumatoid arthritis reduced
New data demonstrating the safety and efficacy of Enbrel (etanercept) in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients over the long-term were presented today at the EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) congress (1). Over 2,000 patients receiving this biologic therapy for up to nine years, saw improvements in disability whilst safety was also sustained over the long-term. Biologics, such as etanercept, work by blocking the action........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 6/13/2007 8:25:19 AM)

Going to bed late may affect the health

Going to bed late may affect the health
College students who go to bed late are more likely to have poor quality sleep, which may affect their mental health and academic performance, as per a research abstract that will be presented Wednesday at SLEEP 2007, the 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS). The study, conducted by Jung Kim, PhD, of Pohang University of Science in Technology in South Korea, was based on a survey of 399 college students........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/13/2007 8:07:53 AM)

College students who pull 'all-nighters' get lower GPA

College students who pull 'all-nighters' get lower GPA
A common practice among a number of college students involves "pulling all-nighters", or a single night of total sleep deprivation, a practice linked to lower grade-point averages in comparison to those who make time for sleep, as per a research abstract that will be presented Wednesday at SLEEP 2007, the 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS). "Sleep in college students is generally inadequate, irregular........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/13/2007 7:48:25 AM)

Antibiotic use in infants linked to asthma

Antibiotic use in infants linked to asthma
New research indicates that children who receive antibiotics before their first birthday are significantly more likely to develop asthma by age 7. The study, reported in the recent issue of CHEST, the peer-evaluated journal of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), reports that children receiving antibiotics in the first year of life were at greater risk for developing asthma by age 7 than those not receiving antibiotics. The risk........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 6/12/2007 5:06:06 AM)

Racial differece in slow wave brain activity during sleep

Racial differece in slow wave brain activity during sleep
Slow wave activity (SWA), a stable trait dependent marker of the intensity of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, is lower in young healthy African-Americans in comparison to Caucasians who were matched for age, gender and body weight, as per a research abstract that will be presented Tuesday at SLEEP 2007, the 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS). Dr. Esra Tasali and his colleagues at the University of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/12/2007 4:51:07 AM)

Diet and Exercise Keyto Surviving BreastCancer

Diet and Exercise Keyto Surviving BreastCancer
Breast cancer survivors who eat a healthy diet and exercise moderately can reduce their risk of dying from breast cancer by half, regardless of their weight, suggests a new longitudinal study from the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Prior studies have looked at the impact of diet or physical activity on breast cancer survival, with mixed results. This study, reported in the June 10 issue of the Journal........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 6/11/2007 3:52:51 PM)

When Medical Residents Work Fewer Hours

When Medical Residents Work Fewer Hours
When medical residents work shorter hours, fewer patients are transferred to intensive care and there are not as a number of interventions by pharmacists to avoid errors in medication, as per a Yale School of Medicine study in Annals of Internal Medicine. In addition, when residents work schedules are limited to 80 hours per week more patients are discharged to their homes or rehabilitation centers instead of facilities such as nursing........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 6/11/2007 3:49:41 PM)

Sun exposure early in life and skin cancer

Sun exposure early in life and skin cancer
Skin cancers often contain different gene mutations, but just how these mutations contribute to the cause of melanomas has been a mystery. A new clue comes from researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Schools of Medicine and Public Health. Their research indicates that early life sun exposure, from birth to 20 years old, may specifically increase the risk of melanomas with BRAF gene mutations. A different mutation, on........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 6/10/2007 8:49:36 PM)

Genetic Risk Factor For Coeliac Disease

Genetic Risk Factor For Coeliac Disease
An international research consortium investigating the genetic causes of intestinal inflammatory conditions has identified a new genetic risk factor for coeliac disease. The findings, published online today (10 June 2007) in the science journal Nature Genetics, could pave the way towards improved diagnostics and therapys for the common, lifelong complaint. Led by David van Heel, Professor of Gastrointestinal Genetics at Queen Mary,........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 6/10/2007 7:30:48 PM)

Simple test predicts 6-year risk of dementia

Simple test predicts 6-year risk of dementia
A simple test that can be given by any doctor predicts a persons risk for developing dementia within six years with 87 percent accuracy, as per a research studyled by scientists at San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC). The test, developed in the study by the researchers, is a 14-point index combining medical history, cognitive testing, and physical examination. It requires no special equipment and can be given in a clinical setting such........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 6/10/2007 7:25:31 PM)

 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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