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A possible biomarker for colon cancer

A possible biomarker for colon cancer
An abnormality of chromosomes long linked to diseases of aging has, for the first time, been associated with colon cancer in people 50 years old and younger, an age group commonly considered young for this disease. The finding may provide an early alert for younger colon cancer patients and could prompt new research into colon cancer prevention and therapy strategies, say Mayo Clinic researchers. The study results will be presented at 10........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 10/28/2007 3:04:46 PM)

Cancer Patients not getting live-saving flu and pneumonia shots

Cancer Patients not getting live-saving flu and pneumonia shots
Eventhough flu and pneumonia can be lethal for cancer patients, more than one quarter of patients undergoing radiation treatment are not complying with national guidelines to be vaccinated against these potentially life-threatening yet preventable illnesses, as per a research studypresented October 28, 2007, at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncologys 49th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles. While Centers for Disease Control........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/28/2007 2:07:56 PM)

Guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

Guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer
Oregon Health & Science University Cancer Institute scientists have observed that highly targeted radiation treatment for prostate cancer can ensure that the majority of persons with this tumor will not have any long-term rectal damage. A group of 231 study participants received a combination of intensity-modulated radiation and seed marker-based image-guided radiation therapies (IM-IGRT) for prostate cancer then were tracked for 1.4 years.........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/28/2007 1:56:02 PM)

'Knocking Out' Cell Receptor May Help to Prevent Weight Gain

'Knocking Out' Cell Receptor May Help to Prevent Weight Gain
University of Cincinnati (UC) pathologists have identified a new molecular target that one day may help researchers develop drugs to reduce fat transport to adipocytes (fat cells) in the body and prevent obesity and related disorders, like diabetes. Detailed in the Oct. 18 online edition and the November 2007 print issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the findings about a specific cell receptor, known as the adipocyte LDL........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/25/2007 10:19:13 PM)

HIV patients sicker when seeking care

HIV patients sicker when seeking care
It was hoped that as HIV therapy improved and as HIV-related public health initiatives encouraged people to be tested for the disease and seek care, that HIV-infected patients would seek care quickly. Unfortunately, a new study indicates that patients are actually sicker when they begin treatment. The study is reported in the November 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, currently available online. The study, carried out in Baltimore,........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/25/2007 10:16:33 PM)

Severely Restricted Diet Linked to Physical Fitness into Old Age

Severely Restricted Diet Linked to Physical Fitness into Old Age
Severely restricting calories leads to a longer life, researchers have proved. New research now has demonstrated for the first time that such a diet also can maintain physical fitness into advanced age, slowing the seemingly inevitable progression to physical disability and loss of independence. The study, using a rat model of life-time caloric restriction, showed that the diet reduces the amount of visceral fat, which expresses........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/24/2007 7:44:02 PM)

Link between obesity and viral infections

Link between obesity and viral infections
Experts dont dispute the important role that diet and activity play in maintaining a healthy weight. But can poor eating habits and a less active lifestyle fully explain the prevalence of obesity in the United States today? That question has led some scientists to ask whether there might be other causes for this serious problem. In the recent issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researcher Richard Atkinson, M.D., asserts that there is a growing........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/23/2007 10:21:27 PM)

Is a good night's sleep crucial for your health?

Is a good night's sleep crucial for your health?
In spring 2005 a large European research and training network was established to investigate the causes and implications of poor sleep from a medical as well as from a social point of view. This EU-financed sleep research project, The biomedical and sociological effects of sleep restriction, is coordinated by Dr. Tarja Porkka-Heiskanen (Stenberg) MD, PhD, at the University of Helsinki, Institute of Biomedicine. The other partners are from UK........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/22/2007 8:52:15 PM)

Faced with Death, Our Minds Turn to Happier Thoughts

Faced with Death, Our Minds Turn to Happier Thoughts
Philosophers and researchers have long been interested in how the mind processes the inevitability of death, both cognitively and emotionally. One would expect, for example, that reminders of our mortality--say the sudden death of a loved one--would throw us into a state of disabling fear of the unknown. But that doesn't happen. If the prospect of death is so incomprehensible, why are we not trembling in a constant state of terror over this........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/22/2007 8:42:16 PM)

Consumer Demand Flavors Food Import Safety Issues

Consumer Demand Flavors Food Import Safety Issues
An ever-changing U.S. consumer who enjoys the convenience of ready-to-eat produce and seasonable fruits during the dead of winter has brought new challenges to food import safety, experts said Oct. 18. With U.S. food imports set to top more than $2 trillion this year and expected to triple by 2015, a panel on food safety commissioned by President Bush met at Texas A&M University to discuss ways to strengthen the national and global import........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/21/2007 10:22:42 PM)

Key To Moonlight Romance

Key To Moonlight Romance
An international team of Australian and Israeli scientists has discovered what could be the aphrodisiac for the biggest moonlight sex event on Earth. An ancient light-sensitive gene has been isolated by scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) that appears to act as a trigger for the annual mass spawning of corals across a third of a million square kilometres of Australia's Great Barrier Reef, shortly........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/21/2007 10:20:19 PM)

Better devices to move injured or artificial limbs

Better devices to move injured or artificial limbs
Neuroresearchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have developed a novel approach for measuring and deciphering brain activity that holds out promise of providing improved movements of natural or artificial limbs by those who have been injured or paralyzed. Neuroresearchers have long been working towards achieving a better understanding of the relationship between brain activity and behavior, and particularly between neural activity in........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/19/2007 5:12:24 AM)

What's been causing your knee to ache? Smurfs!

What's been causing your knee to ache?  Smurfs!
A new clinical trial seeks to predict who is most likely to experience osteoarthritis, and to test whether an experimental therapy can prevent it altogether. Physicians are setting their sights on people who sustain a knee injury, seeking to understand why nearly half of them will later go on to develop osteoarthritis, a debilitating condition that causes pain and disability in more than 20 million Americans each year. The work is funded by........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 10/19/2007 4:58:29 AM)

Exposure to sunlight may decrease breast cancer risk

Exposure to sunlight may decrease breast cancer risk
A research team from the Northern California Cancer Center, the University of Southern California, and Wake Forest University School of Medicine has observed that increased exposure to sunlight which increases levels of vitamin D in the body. -- may decrease the risk of advanced breast cancer. In a study reported online this week in the American Journal of Epidemiology, the scientists observed that women with high sun exposure had half........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 10/19/2007 4:55:00 AM)

Feeling sleepy is all in your genes

Feeling sleepy is all in your genes
Genes responsible for our 24 hour body clock influence not only the timing of sleep, but also appear to be central to the actual restorative process of sleep, as per research reported in the online open access journal BMC Neuroscience. The study identified changes in the brain that lead to the increased desire and need for sleep during time spent awake. "We still do not know why we benefit from sleep, or why we feel tired when we are........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/17/2007 9:32:28 PM)

Aspirin: just for men?

Aspirin:  just for men?
First it was an apple, now it is an aspirin a day that may keep the doctor away. Aspirin has become standard for heart attack prevention, but research reported in the online open access journal BMC Medicine suggests that this may really be a man's drug. Researchers have long puzzled over why the protective effects of aspirin vary so widely between clinical trials. Some trials show no difference between aspirin and placebo, whilst others........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 10/17/2007 9:12:44 PM)

Height affects how people perceive their quality of life

Height affects how people perceive their quality of life
Your height in adult life significantly affects your quality of life, with short people reporting worse physical and mental health than people of normal height. This large, peer evaluated study, which appears in Clinical Endocrinology, shows that adult height is associated with how good a person thinks their health is. Short people judge their state of health to be significantly lower than their normal height peers do. The data for this........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/17/2007 8:29:36 PM)

Study shows reducing class size may be more cost-effective

Study shows reducing class size may be more cost-effective
Reducing the number of students per classroom in U.S. primary schools may be more cost-effective than most public health and medical interventions, as per a research studyby scientists at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the Virginia Commonwealth University. The study indicates that class-size reductions would generate more quality-adjusted life-year gains per dollar invested than the majority of medical interventions. ........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/17/2007 4:49:20 AM)

Farm kids have lower risk of asthma

Farm kids have lower risk of asthma
Farm children appear to have a lower risk of asthma than their urban counterparts or even those living in a non-agricultural rural environment, as per a University of Alberta study. Analysis of two surveys involving 13,524 asthmafree children aged less than 12 years in the ongoing Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) showed that children living in a farming environment had a lower risk of developing asthma than........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 10/16/2007 7:44:30 PM)

How schizophrenia develops

How schizophrenia develops
Schizophrenia may occur, in part, because of a problem in an intermittent on/off switch for a gene involved in making a key chemical messenger in the brain, researchers have found in a study of human brain tissue. The scientists observed that the gene is turned on at increasingly high rates during normal development of the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain involved in higher functions like thinking and decision-making but that this........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/16/2007 7:38:22 PM)

 

Smoking breast cancer link

Smoking  breast cancer link
Smoking cigarettes is linked to an increased risk of cancers of the lung, head and neck, esophagus, bladder and a number of others and also affects response to anti-cancer therapys. But smoking does not result in more advanced stage diagnoses or aggressive breast cancers at the time of diagnosis. That is the result of an analysis of 35 years of data for more than 6,000 patients presented today at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 10/28/2007 2:14:57 PM)

Walking prevents bone loss caused from prostate cancer treatment

Walking prevents bone loss caused from prostate cancer treatment
Exercise may reduce, and even reverse, bone loss caused by hormone and radiation therapies used in the therapy of localized prostate cancer, thereby decreasing the potential risk of bone fractures and improving quality of life for these men, as per a research studypresented on October 28, 2007, at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncologys 49th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles. Patients with prostate cancer are not routinely........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 10/28/2007 2:01:52 PM)

How Diseases Jump Across Species

How Diseases Jump Across Species
Scientists at the University of Leeds have made a breakthrough in understanding a virus which poses one of the greatest global disease threats to wild carnivores including lions, African wild dogs and several types of seal. The discovery of how canine distemper Virus (CDV) jumps across and infects different species of carnivores could lead to a more effective monitoring and control of the virus. Whilst these 'pathogen jumps' across........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/25/2007 10:24:52 PM)

Recognizing someone's name but forgetting how you met them

Recognizing someone's name but forgetting how you met them
New research from The University of Western Ontario suggests the sometimes eerie feeling experience when recognizing someone, yet failing to remember how or why, reveals important insight into how memory is wired in the human brain. In research published recently in one of the world's most-cited multidisciplinary scientific publications, "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA," Western psychology graduate student Ben Bowles and........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/25/2007 10:22:50 PM)

Pregnant women at risk for unnecessary operations

Pregnant women at risk for unnecessary operations
New research reported in the recent issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons suggests that pregnant women suspected of having appendicitis are often misdiagnosed and undergo unnecessary appendectomies (removal of the appendix) that can result in early delivery or loss of the fetus. The study points to the need to require more accurate diagnosis to avoid unnecessary operations and the potential for fetal loss. Appendicitis is........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 10/24/2007 8:05:44 PM)

Cannabis a double-edged sword

Cannabis a double-edged sword
A new neurobiological study has observed that a synthetic form of THC, the active ingredient in cannabis, is an effective anti-depressant at low doses. However, at higher doses, the effect reverses itself and can actually worsen depression and other psychiatric conditions like psychosis. The study, reported in the October 24 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, was led by Dr. Gabriella Gobbi of McGill University and Le Centre de Recherche........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/23/2007 10:23:14 PM)

Mate tea lower cholesterol

Mate tea lower cholesterol
When a study in her lab showed that mate tea drinkers had experienced a significant increase in the activity of an enzyme that promotes HDL (good) cholesterol while lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol, University of Illinois scientist Elvira de Mejia headed for Argentina where mate tea has been grown and taken medicinally for centuries. She returned with a five-year agreement signed by administrators of La Universidad Nacional de Misiones (UNaM)........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 10/23/2007 10:19:09 PM)

MRI predicts liver fibrosis, study says

MRI predicts liver fibrosis, study says
Moderate to severe chronic liver disease can be predicted with the use of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), as per a recent study conducted by scientists at New York University Medical Center in New York, NY. Due to the increased occurence rate of chronic hepatitis in the United States, especially hepatitis C, there is a strong need for non-invasive methods to replace or supplement liver biopsy, which is relatively invasive and limited by........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 10/23/2007 10:15:39 PM)

Exercise improves thinking

Exercise improves thinking
Just three months of daily, vigorous physical activity in overweight children improves their thinking and reduces their diabetes risk, scientists say. Studies of about 200 overweight, inactive children ages 7-11 also showed that a regular exercise program reduces body fat and improves bone density. "Is exercise a magic wand that turns them into lean, healthy kids? No. They are still overweight but less so, with less fat, a healthier........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/22/2007 8:33:42 PM)

Clinical trial evaluating brain cancer vaccine

Clinical trial evaluating brain cancer vaccine
A clinical trial evaluating a brain cancer vaccine in patients with newly diagnosed brain cancer has begun at NYU Medical Center. The study will evaluate the addition of the vaccine following standard treatment with surgery and chemotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a deadly form of brain cancer. The vaccine, called DCVax-Brain, incorporates proteins found in patients tumors and is designed to attack cancer cells........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/22/2007 5:03:24 AM)

Major genetic breakthrough for ankylosing spondylitis

Major genetic breakthrough for ankylosing spondylitis
Research funded by the Wellcome Trust and the Arthritis Research Campaign has identified two genes implicated in the disease ankylosing spondylitis, a common disease primarily causing back pain and progressive stiffness. The research, published online today in Nature Genetics, suggests that a therapy currently being trialled for Crohn's disease may also be applied to this disease. Ankylosing spondylitis affects as a number of as 1 in 200 men........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 10/21/2007 10:00:38 PM)

Sidestepping cancer's chaperone

Sidestepping cancer's chaperone
Malignant tumors are wildly unfavorable environments. Struggling for oxygen and nutrients while being bombarded by the bodys defense systems, tumor cells in fact require sophisticated adaptations to survive and grow. For decades, researchers have sought ways to circumvent these adaptations to destroy cancer. Now, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS), have defined a method to target and kill cancers chaperonea........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/19/2007 5:07:07 AM)

The specific cell that causes eye cancer

The specific cell that causes eye cance
Investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have identified the cell that gives rise to the eye cancer retinoblastoma, disproving a long-standing principle of nerve growth and development. The finding suggests for the first time that it may one day be possible for researchers to induce fully developed neurons to multiply and coax the injured brain to repair itself. A report of this work appears in the Oct. 19 issue of the journal........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 10/19/2007 5:04:14 AM)

When Less is More: Too Much Happiness May Be Too Much

When Less is More: Too Much Happiness May Be Too Much
Are you happy? Well don't try to be happier; you might become less happy. That is the gist of a multi-cultural study published this month in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. The study by University of Virginia psychology professor Shigehiro Oishi and his colleagues at three other institutions observed that, on average, European-Americans claim to be happy in general - more happy than Asian-Americans or Koreans or Japanese -........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/19/2007 4:52:02 AM)

Newly qualified doctors feel well prepared

Newly qualified doctors feel well prepared
In comparison to 2000, significantly more newly qualified doctors think that their medical school training prepares them well for their first clinical posts, as per research reported in the online open access journal, BMC Medical Education. The research team, led by Judith Cave from the Royal Free and University College Medical School in London, sent out questionnaires in 2005 to all doctors newly qualified from UK medical schools; more than........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/17/2007 9:19:09 PM)

Using honey to heal wounds

Using honey to heal wounds
Surgeons are being advised to consider the supermarket as well as the drugs cupboard when it comes to effective wound healing, as per a research review reported in the recent issue of IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice. And patients whove undergone surgery should ask their doctors whether they should apply honey to their wounds to speed up healing and reduce infection. Honey is one of the oldest foods in existence and........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 10/17/2007 9:06:50 PM)

HPV test beats Pap in detecting cervical cancer

HPV test beats Pap in detecting cervical cancer
A new study led by McGill University scientists shows that the human papillomavirus (HPV) screening test is far more accurate than the traditional Pap test in detecting cervical cancer. The first round of the Canadian Cervical Cancer Screening Trial (CCCaST), led by Dr. Eduardo Franco, Director of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology at McGill's Faculty of Medicine, concluded that the HPV test's ability to accurately detect pre-malignant lesions........Go to the Cervical cancer blog (Added on 10/17/2007 8:21:35 PM)

Young toddlers think in terms of the whole object

Young toddlers think in terms of the whole object
Seeing through a child's eyes can help parents better introduce new words to young toddlers, as per research from Purdue University. "This new research shows that as young toddlers learn language, they are more likely to focus on objects rather than parts," said George Hollich, an assistant professor of psychological sciences. "Because of this bias, children automatically assume you are talking about an object. So, when labeling more than........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/17/2007 8:12:10 PM)

Gold nanorods to fighting cancer

Gold nanorods to fighting cancer
Scientists have shown how tiny "nanorods" of gold can be triggered by a laser beam to blast holes in the membranes of tumor cells, setting in motion a complex biochemical mechanism that leads to a tumor cell's self-destruction. Tumor cell membranes often have an abnormally high number of receptor sites to capture molecules of folic acid, or folate, a form of vitamin B that a number of tumor cells crave. The Purdue scientists attached folate........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/17/2007 4:47:25 AM)

Ear infection superbug resistant to all pediatric antibiotics

Ear infection superbug resistant to all pediatric antibiotics
Scientists have discovered a strain of bacteria resistant to all approved drugs used to fight ear infections in children, as per an article would be published tomorrow in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). A pair of pediatricians discovered the strain because it is their standard practice to perform an uncommon procedure called tympanocentesis (ear tap) on children when several antibiotics fail to clear up their ear........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/16/2007 7:21:08 PM)

 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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