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Oxytocin Level and Mother-Child Bond

Oxytocin Level and Mother-Child Bond
Humans are hard-wired to form enduring bonds with others. One of the primary bonds across the mammalian species is the mother-infant bond. Evolutionarily speaking, it is in a mother's best interest to foster the well-being of her child; however, some mothers just seem a bit more maternal than others do. Now, new research points to a hormone that predicts the level of bonding between mother and child. In animals, oxytocin, dubbed "the hormone........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/15/2007 9:52:07 PM)

Night-time acid reflux can impact sleep

Night-time acid reflux can impact sleep
As per results of a survey presented at the 72nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology, nighttime acid reflux, along with some of the less typical manifestations or symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is linked to significant sleep impairment. In a recent national survey, scientists assessed the prevalence of sleep impairment among people with GERD and people without GERD based on response to........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 10/15/2007 6:09:18 PM)

Serious, manifestations of acid reflux

Serious, manifestations of acid reflux
A number of people may not realize that symptoms such as chronic cough or chest pain can be caused by acid reflux into the esophagus, because they do not experience classic heartburn symptoms or acid regurgitation. Two new studies presented at the 72nd ACG Annual Scientific Meeting highlight the little known correlation between gastroesophageal reflux and seemingly unrelated problems. Scientists at the Brigham & Womens Hospital in Boston........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 10/15/2007 4:53:28 PM)

Rejection sets off alarms for folks with low self-esteem

Rejection sets off alarms for folks with low self-esteem
Few can tolerate such romantic or professional rebuffs as "It's not you, it's me" and "we regret to inform you that your application was not successful." But while a healthy dose of self-esteem can absorb the shock of rejection, poor self-esteem can trigger the primal fight-or-flight response, as per a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. That doesn't mean people with low self-esteem are doomed to respond defensively to........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/12/2007 5:12:40 AM)

Anticlotting drug safe in sickle cell patients

Anticlotting drug safe in sickle cell patients
An intravenous blood thinner widely used in patients with acute coronary syndromes and during coronary artery stent placement appears to be safe in patients with sickle cell disease and may have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects, a small study at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine has found. We have tested a potentially promising drug in sickle cell patients, and the drug appears to be well tolerated. This........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/12/2007 5:00:13 AM)

Patients can't recall their medications to tell doctors

Patients can't recall their medications to tell doctors
Doctors rely on patients to accurately tell them what prescription medications and what dosages -- they are taking in out-patient visits. (A patient's chart may not always be available or complete.) That information is essential for physicians to monitor whether a drug is working, and whether it may have adverse interactions with any new medications prescribed. Depending on patients recall of their drugs, however, may be dangerous to their........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/12/2007 4:58:20 AM)

Why some prostate cancer recurs after treatment

Why some prostate cancer recurs after treatment
Cancer scientists have long worked to understand why some prostate cancers recur after the use of therapies designed to stop the production of testosterone and other androgens that fuel cancer cell growth. New research has now detected that androgen-synthesizing proteins are present within cancer cells, which suggests that cancer cells may develop the capacity to produce their own androgens. The presence of these proteins may explain why........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 10/11/2007 10:29:44 PM)

Brain circuits used in sensation of touch

Brain circuits used in sensation of touch
The ability to tactually recognize fine spatial details, such as the raised dots used in braille, is particularly important to those who are blind. With that in mind, a team of scientists has identified the neural circuitry that facilitates spatial discrimination through touch. Understanding this circuitry may lead to the creation of sensory-substitution devices, such as tactile maps for the visually impaired. The findings are reported in........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/10/2007 5:23:10 PM)

Revimmune for refractory MS

Revimmune for refractory MS
Accentia Biopharmaceuticals announces that it met with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on September 26, 2007 for a scheduled pre-Investigational New Drug (pre-IND) meeting on Revimmune. The FDA has indicated its support for Accentia to submit an IND for a pivotal Phase 3 randomized controlled, multi-center clinical trial of Revimmune, the companys potential therapeutic for refractory, relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/10/2007 5:09:15 AM)

New radioactive agents for colon cancer work inside cells

New radioactive agents for colon cancer work inside cells
Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a potentially novel way to fight colorectal cancer using tiny molecules to deliver potent barrages of radiation inside cancer cells, unlike current therapys that bind to the surface of cells and attack from the outside and cause unwanted side effects. In laboratory studies with normal and cancer cells, the new radiation delivery system proved able to specifically target colon cancer cells, and whats........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 10/10/2007 4:47:22 AM)

Genes That Increase Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk

Genes That Increase Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Scientists in the United States and Sweden have identified a genetic region linked to increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic and debilitating inflammatory disease of the joints that affects an estimated 2.1 million Americans. The U.S. arm of the study involved a long-time collaboration between intramural scientists of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) and other organizations. NIAMS........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 10/8/2007 3:52:51 PM)

Got calcium?

Got calcium?
Current food labeling leads to under-consumption of calcium, as per this study. Those who were taught how to translate the information consumed more. Scientists believe the same is true for other beneficial nutrients. A woman at risk for osteoporosis is told by her doctor to get 1,200-1,500 milligrams of calcium every day. But when she looks at the Nutrition Facts panel on a carton of yogurt or a jug of milk, she finds that calcium is only........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/8/2007 11:18:51 AM)

Brain Center Responsible for Tinnitus

Brain Center Responsible for Tinnitus
For the more than 50 million Americans who experience the phantom sounds of tinnitus -- ringing in the ears that can range from annoying to debilitating -- certain well-trained rats may be their best hope for finding relief. Scientists at the University at Buffalo have studied the condition for more than 10 years and have developed these animal models, which can "tell" the scientists if they are experiencing tinnitus. These researchers........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 10/8/2007 9:39:18 AM)

Medicare modernization act and chemotherapy

Medicare modernization act and chemotherapy
Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy have not noticed a restriction in their access to therapy following the enactment of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA), despite the act's significant reduction in government reimbursement to oncologists, as per a new study led by scientists in the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI). Critics of the MMA often said that it would reduce patients access to........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/8/2007 8:47:31 AM)

Limiting refined carbohydrates may stall AMD progression

Limiting refined carbohydrates may stall AMD progression
Eating fewer refined carbohydrates may slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), as per a new study from scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. AMD results in partial or total blindness in 7 to 15% of the elderly, as per the Eye Diseases Prevalence Research Group. Dietary changes may be the most practical and cost-effective prevention method to combat progression........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 10/8/2007 8:32:19 AM)

Swimming Babies And Infections

Swimming Babies And Infections
Researchers of the GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health (Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres) found indications for an association between attendance of swimming pools in the first year of life and the frequency of infections. Diarrhoea and otitis media during the first year of life are particularly noteworthy. No increased risks were found for atopic diseases during the first six years. "In this way, the........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/4/2007 9:45:10 PM)

Cholesterol metabolism and Alzheimer's disease

Cholesterol metabolism and Alzheimer's disease
Eventhough the causes of Alzheimer's disease are not completely understood, amyloid-beta (A-beta) is widely considered a likely culprit the "sticky" protein clumps into plaques thought to harm brain cells. But now scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have uncovered evidence strengthening the case for another potential cause of Alzheimer's. The finding also represents the first time researchers have found a........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/4/2007 9:35:11 PM)

Fu vaccination for health-care workers

Fu vaccination for health-care workers
The American College of Physicians (ACP) recommends that an annual influenza vaccine should be mandatory for every health care worker with direct patient care activities. Only 36 percent of all health care workers are immunized against influenza each year. Transmission of influenza from health care workers to patients has been documented in nearly every health care setting, and multiple studies show that 70 percent or more of health care........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/4/2007 5:11:43 AM)

Converting brain signals into action

Converting brain signals into action
MIT scientists have developed a new algorithm to help create prosthetic devices that convert brain signals into action in patients who have been paralyzed or had limbs amputated. The technique, described in a paper published as the cover article in the October edition of the Journal of Neurophysiology, unifies seemingly disparate approaches taken by experimental groups that prototype these neural prosthetic devices in animals or humans. ........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/4/2007 5:07:39 AM)

Stomach stem cell discovery could bring cancer insights

Stomach stem cell discovery could bring cancer insights
Researchers have identified and described stem cells specific to several tissues and organs of the body key master cells that give rise to the specialized cell types characteristic of that organ. But to date, it hasnt been possible to pinpoint functioning stem cells in the stomach, either in laboratory animals or people. Now, a group of University of Michigan Medical School scientists has succeeded in finding and manipulating a population........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/4/2007 4:50:44 AM)

 

Cancer death rate decline doubling

Cancer death rate decline doubling
A new report from the nations leading cancer organizations shows cancer death rates decreased on average 2.1 percent per year from 2002 through 2004, nearly twice the annual decrease of 1.1 percent per year from 1993 through 2002. The findings are in the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2004, Featuring Cancer in American Indians and Alaska Natives published online October 15, 2007........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/15/2007 6:19:22 PM)

Consumption of raw fish: potential health concerns

Consumption of raw fish: potential health concerns
Two case studies from Japan presented at the 72nd Annual Meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology point to a potential health problem in the United States, as more Americans consume raw fish in the form of sushi and sashimi. Anisakiasis (round worm) is a human parasitic infection caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood containing Anisakis larvae. Consumers should be aware that while larvae for the parasitic worm........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/15/2007 6:12:56 PM)

First colonoscopy with removal of polyps

First colonoscopy with removal of polyps
Using a model to predict reductions in death from colorectal cancer, epidemiologists and clinical scientists from Memorial Sloan-Kettering looked at the relative effect of an initial screening colonoscopy which clears pre-malignant polyps from the colon versus surveillance follow-up colonoscopy. Ann G. Zauber, Ph.D., Sidney J. Winawer, M.D., MACG and his colleagues presented their findings at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 10/15/2007 4:43:28 PM)

Simple eye scan opens window to multiple sclerosis

Simple eye scan opens window to multiple sclerosis
A five-minute eye exam might prove to be an inexpensive and effective way to gauge and track the debilitating neurological disease multiple sclerosis, potentially complementing costly magnetic resonance imaging to detect brain shrinkage - a characteristic of the diseases progression. A Johns Hopkins-based study of a group of 40 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients used a process called optical coherence tomography (OCT) to scan the layers of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/15/2007 4:40:30 PM)

Molecules that block cancer cells from modifying cell DNA

Molecules that block cancer cells from modifying cell DNA
Scientists have discovered new small molecules that may prevent prostate cancer cells from turning off normal genes in a process that transforms normal cells into cancer cells. This significant discovery in the field of epigenetics has immediate implications in the development of new diagnostic tests and cancer medications. The findings were presented today at the Prostate Cancer Foundations annual Scientific Retreat. Funding for the research........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/12/2007 5:09:27 AM)

Welders at risk for loss of sense of smell

Welders at risk for loss of sense of smell
PHILADELPHIA Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have observed that professional welders who work in enclosed spaces with poor ventilation may be at risk for loss of sense of smell. The study appears in Neurology. This is the first study to clearly demonstrate that welders who work in confined spaces without adequate respiratory protection are at risk for damaging their sense of smell, says Richard Doty, PhD,........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/11/2007 10:53:27 PM)

MIT finds new hearing mechanism

MIT finds new hearing mechanism
MIT scientists have discovered a hearing mechanism that fundamentally changes the current understanding of inner ear function. This new mechanism could help explain the ear's remarkable ability to sense and discriminate sounds. Its discovery could eventually lead to improved systems for restoring hearing. The research is described in the advance online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences the week of October 8. MIT........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 10/10/2007 6:47:53 PM)

Obesity boosts oesophageal cancer

Obesity boosts oesophageal cancer
Obese people are six times as likely to develop gullet (oesophageal) cancer as people of healthy weight, shows research published ahead of print in the journal Gut. Rates of oesophageal cancer have been rising rapidly, and in some countries, they have risen faster than those of every other major cancer, say the authors. The findings are based on a comparison of almost 800 people with oesophageal cancer and almost 1600 randomly selected........Go to the Esophageal cancer blog (Added on 10/10/2007 5:49:17 PM)

Prostate cancer more likely to return in blacks

Prostate cancer more likely to return in blacks
African-American men are more likely to have their prostate cancer return after therapy, but their disease is no more aggressive when it does recur than that of their white counterparts, as per a research studyled by Duke Prostate Center researchers. Our study observed that African-American men have a slightly higher risk of what is known as PSA recurrence, which is a blood test that indicates the presence of cancer based on the levels of a........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 10/10/2007 5:10:26 AM)

Married men have lower testosterone levels

Married men have lower testosterone levels
A fascinating new study is the first outside of North America to observe lower testosterone levels among married men. Supporting a growing body of research, the study reveals that even married men who are considered aloof spouses and provide minimal parenting have much lower testosterone levels than single, unmarried men. In the recent issue of Current Anthropology, Peter B. Gray (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), Peter T. Ellison (Harvard........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/10/2007 5:07:43 AM)

Low-Fat Dietary To Lower Risk of Ovarian Cancer

Low-Fat Dietary To Lower Risk of Ovarian Cancer
A diet low in fat could reduce the risk of ovary cancer in healthy postmenopausal women, as per new results from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Dietary Modification Trial. Scientists observed that after four years, women who decreased the amount of dietary fat they consumed were 40 percent less likely to develop ovary cancer than women who followed normal dietary patterns. As expected, no effect was found during the first four years........Go to the Ovarian cancer blog (Added on 10/9/2007 8:55:34 PM)

Apatone for cancer treatment

Apatone for cancer treatment
In a significant advancement in the ongoing battle against cancer, a group of scientists from Summa Health System, IC-MedTech and other institutions have completed the first ever FDA-approved human clinical trial of Apatone. Demonstrating promising results, Apatone exploits a new strategy to selectively lower the level of compounds within tumor cells that assist in energy production and protect against chemotherapy. This non-toxic approach........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/8/2007 11:20:59 AM)

Nanoparticle drug delivery system

Nanoparticle drug delivery system
There are two aspects to creating an effective drug: finding a chemical compound that has the desired biological effect and minimal side-effects and then delivering it to the right place in the body for it to do its job. With the support from a $478,000, five-year CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, Eva Harth is tackling the second part of this problem. She is creating a modular, multi-functional drug delivery system that........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/8/2007 9:36:42 AM)

Hip size of mothers linked to breast cancer in daughters

Hip size of mothers linked to breast cancer in daughters
In a study of the maternity records of more than 6,000 women, David J.P. Barker, M.D., Ph.D., and Kent Thornburg, Ph.D., of Oregon Health & Science University discovered a strong connection between the size and shape of a womans hips and her daughters risk of breast cancer. Wide, round hips, the scientists postulated, represent markers of high sex hormone concentrations in the mother, which increase her daughters vulnerability to breast cancer.........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 10/8/2007 8:36:21 AM)

Folic acid lowers blood arsenic levels

Folic acid lowers blood arsenic levels
A new study by scientists at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health finds that folic acid supplements can dramatically lower blood arsenic levels in individuals exposed to arsenic through contaminated drinking water. This toxic element, naturally present in some aquifers used for drinking, is currently a significant public health problem in at least 70 countries, including several developing countries and also parts of the U.S. ........Go to the Health news blog (Added on 10/8/2007 8:22:00 AM)

Kids still not drinking enough milk

Kids still not drinking enough milk
American children are drinking too little milk and what they are consuming is too high in fat, as per a Penn State study. "There is a strong connection between dairy consumption and calcium," says Sibylle Kranz, assistant professor of nutritional sciences. "While there is calcium in fortified orange juice, for example, it is not as bioavailable as that found in milk." She notes that people need to take calcium with vitamin D and some........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/4/2007 9:38:36 PM)

How Candida albicans transforms from its life-threatening form

How Candida albicans transforms from its life-threatening form
Researchers at the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's (A*STAR) Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) have discovered new molecular mechanisms that provide a more detailed understanding of how the normally non-cancerous Dr. Jekyll-like fungus known as Candida albicans transforms into a serious and often life-threatening Mr. Hyde-like form. C. albicans can cause serious and potentially life-threatening infections in the........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/4/2007 9:13:04 PM)

Towards Early Cancer Detection

Towards Early Cancer Detection
A test to detect the very early stages of cancer could one day result from new research by Cardiff University scientists. A team at the University's School of Medicine has just published a study on telomeres - small structures at the end of human chromosomes which can play a crucial part in the onset of cancer. Telomeres control cell division in the body - by gradually becoming shorter they can tell cells when it is time to stop dividing.........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/4/2007 5:13:58 AM)

Combination vaccines okay for infants

Combination vaccines okay for infants
A University of Rochester study brings relief to new parents who, while navigating a jam-packed childhood vaccine schedule, can expect to soothe their newborn through as a number of as 15 pokes by his or her six-month checkup. The study, recently published in The Journal of Pediatrics, shows that no efficacy or safety is compromised when clinicians administer a new combination vaccine that streamlines the process in effect, tripling up........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/4/2007 5:03:44 AM)

Apple compounds reduce risk of pancreatic cancer

Apple compounds reduce risk of pancreatic cancer
Eating flavonol-rich foods like apples may help reduce the risk of pancreas cancer, says a team of international researchers. Quercetin, which is found naturally in apples and onions, has been identified as one of the most beneficial flavonols in preventing and reducing the risk of pancreas cancer. Eventhough the overall risk was reduced among the study participants, smokers who consumed foods rich in flavonols had a significantly greater........Go to the Pancreatic cancer blog (Added on 10/4/2007 4:53:00 AM)

 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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