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New prognostic marker for breast cancer

New prognostic marker for breast cancer
Elevated levels of GLI1 (glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1) protein in human breast cancer are linked to unfavorable prognosis and progressive stages of disease. Scientists writing in the open access journal BMC Cancer found increased expression of GLI1 in samples taken from more advanced and less survivable tumors. Edgar Dahl led a team of scientists from RWTH Aachen's University Hospital who sought to evaluate whether GLI1 could........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 8/24/2009 10:42:52 PM)


What she sees in you

What she sees in you
When it comes to potential mates, women appears to be as complicated as men claim they are, as per psychology experts. "We have observed that women evaluate facial attractiveness on two levels -- a sexual level, based on specific facial features like the jawbone, cheekbone and lips, and a nonsexual level based on overall aesthetics," said Robert G. Franklin, graduate student in psychology working with Reginald Adams, assistant professor of........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/24/2009 10:36:30 PM)


Why Weight Watchers succeed

Why Weight Watchers succeed
Weight Watchers is the world's largest support group, with more than 1.5 million members worldwide. What makes overweight consumers turn to this organization for help? A newly released study in the Journal of Consumer Research says dieters are attracted to its combination of spirituality and treatment. Authors Risto Moisio (California State University, Long Beach) and Mariam Beruchashvili (California State University, Northridge) undertook........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 8/24/2009 10:23:35 PM)


Visits Nana's with your toddlers

Visits Nana's with your toddlers
It's easy to list the negative stereotypes attributed to the elderly: they are considered forgetful, hard-of-hearing, absent-minded and confused. What's unsettling is that those stereotypes can be present in children as young as two or three. Research conducted by the University of Alberta's Sheree Kwong See, a psychology researcher, has identified that those stereotypes exist in some children at that age, which could adversely affect........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/21/2009 7:14:50 AM)


Alcohol advertising reaching too many teens on cable

Alcohol advertising reaching too many teens on cable
A newly released study from the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, in collaboration with UCLA, has found a striking connection between teenage viewership and the frequency of alcohol advertising on cable television. The findings show that ads for beer, spirits and "alcopop" aired much more frequently when more teens were watching. While prior studies have shown that the average adolescent is exposed to well over 200 alcohol ads on........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/21/2009 7:10:04 AM)


Evolution of the appendix

Evolution of the appendix
The lowly appendix, long-regarded as a useless evolutionary artifact, won newfound respect two years ago when scientists at Duke University Medical Center proposed that it actually serves a critical function. The appendix, they said, is a safe haven where good bacteria could hang out until they were needed to repopulate the gut after a nasty case of diarrhea, for example. Now, some of those same scientists are back, reporting on the........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/21/2009 7:08:45 AM)


Stem Cells Repair the Human Brain

Stem Cells Repair the Human Brain
There is no known cure for neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. But new hope, in the form of stem cells created from the patient's own bone marrow, can be found - and literally seen - in laboratories at Tel Aviv University. Dr. Yoram Cohen of TAU's School of Chemistry has recently proven the viability of these innovative stem cells, called mesenchymal stem cells, using in-vivo MRI. Dr. Cohen has been........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 8/20/2009 7:03:16 AM)


Living longer and happier

Living longer and happier
A newly released study from the University of Missouri may shed light on how to increase the level and quality of activity in the elderly. In the study, published in this week's edition of Public Library of Science ONE, MU scientists observed that gene treatment with a proven "longevity" gene energized mice during exercise, and might be applicable to humans in the future. "Aging is one of the biggest challenges to a modern society. A........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/20/2009 6:48:41 AM)


Women with abnormal paps

Women with abnormal paps
Less than half of Ontario women with abnormal Pap tests receive recommended and potentially life-saving follow-up care, as per a new women's health study by scientists at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). What's more, low-income women are less likely to be screened for cancer in comparison to their high-income counterparts. "Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable forms of cancer, yet in........Go to the Cervical cancer blog (Added on 8/20/2009 6:40:32 AM)


Retirees' health-care benefits at risk

Retirees' health-care benefits at risk
A nearly two-decade trend that is stripping away employer-provided health-care benefits for retirees in private business will likely continue and could soon hit an even deeper pool of government retirees, new research by a University of Illinois elder law expert warns. Richard L. Kaplan says the steady erosion of private sector benefits stems largely from a 1992 change in accounting standards that requires employers to project future........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/19/2009 6:55:22 AM)


MRI-detected breast lesions

MRI-detected breast lesions
Reston, Va. Breast MRI allows physicians to evaluate suspicious lesions using a variety of variables. Scientists have found though that computer-aided kinetic information can help significantly in distinguishing non-malignant from cancerous suspicious breast lesions on MRI, as per a research studyreported in the recent issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). . In the study, performed at the University of Washington Medical........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 8/19/2009 6:41:18 AM)


Ibuprofen is as effective as acetaminophen with codeine

Ibuprofen is as effective as acetaminophen with codeine
Children with arm fractures fared as well with ibuprofen to control their pain as acetaminophen with codeine, as per a newly released study by scientists at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and Children's Research Institute. The study, which was led by Amy Drendel, D.O., assistant professor of pediatrics at the Medical College, will appear in the Aug. 18, 2009, issue of the Annals of Emergency Medicine Dr. Drendel also is a........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 8/18/2009 7:58:44 AM)


Work together for successful kids

Work together for successful kids
It is widely understood that, ideally, schools and parents should work together to ensure that children can succeed as students and citizens. But what is the right balance? And how much do teachers want parents involved in the classroom? A newly released study from North Carolina State University identifies ways that schools and communities can work with parents to give children the greatest chance of success. Scientists at NC State say........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/18/2009 7:57:13 AM)


The buzz on an amazing new mosquito repellent

The buzz on an amazing new mosquito repellent
After searching for more than 50 years, researchers finally have discovered many new mosquito repellents that beat DEET, the gold standard for warding off those pesky, sometimes disease-carrying insects. The stuff seems like a dream come true. It makes mosquitoes buzz off three times longer than DEET, the active ingredient in a number of of today's bug repellents. It does not have the unpleasant odor of DEET. And it does not cause DEET's........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/16/2009 9:17:01 PM)


Hazardous chemicals in smokeless tobacco

Hazardous chemicals in smokeless tobacco
Attention all smokeless tobacco users! It's time to banish the comforting notion that snuff and chewing tobacco are safe because they don't burn and produce inhalable smoke like cigarettes. A study that looked beyond the well-researched tobacco hazards, nitrosamines and nicotine, has discovered a single pinch the amount in a portion of smokeless tobacco exposes the user to the same amount of another group of dangerous chemicals as the smoke........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/16/2009 9:11:37 PM)


New biomarker predicts response to hepatitis C treatment

New biomarker predicts response to hepatitis C treatment
Scientists have identified the first genetic marker that predicts response to hepatitis C therapys, and a single letter of DNA code appears to make a huge difference. Duke University Medical Center researchers says the biomarker not only predicts who is most likely to respond to therapy and who isn't, but also may explain why there are such different rates of response among racial and ethnic groups, a phenomenon that has puzzled physicians for........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 8/16/2009 8:49:58 PM)


Gene implicated in regulating length of human sleep

Gene implicated in regulating length of human sleep
Researchers have discovered the first gene involved in regulating the optimal length of human sleep, offering a window into a key aspect of slumber, an enigmatic phenomenon that is critical to human physical and mental health. The team, reporting in the Aug. 14, 2009 issue of Science, identified a mutated gene that allows two members of an extended family to thrive on six hours of sleep a day rather than the eight to eight-and-a-half hours........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 8/14/2009 7:17:59 AM)


Uncovering the secrets of ulcer-causing bacteria

Uncovering the secrets of ulcer-causing bacteria
A team of scientists from Boston University, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts Institute of Technology recently made a discovery that changes a long held paradigm about how bacteria move through soft gels. They showed that the bacterium that causes human stomach ulcers uses a clever biochemical strategy to alter the physical properties of its environment, allowing it to move and survive and further colonize its host. The Proceedings........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 8/13/2009 7:06:29 AM)


MRI may cause more harm than good in newly diagnosed early breast cancer

MRI may cause more harm than good in newly diagnosed early breast cancer
A new review says using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before surgery to assess the extent of early breast cancer has not been shown to improve surgical planning, reduce follow-up surgery, or reduce the risk of local recurrences. The review, appearing early online in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, says evidence shows that MRI increases the chances of more extensive surgery over conservative approaches, with no evidence that it improves........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 8/13/2009 6:52:41 AM)


Successfully reverse multiple sclerosis in mice

Successfully  reverse multiple sclerosis in mice
A new experimental therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) completely reverses the devastating autoimmune disorder in mice, and might work exactly the same way in humans, say scientists at the Jewish General Hospital Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research and McGill University in Montreal. MS is an autoimmune disease in which the body's own immune response attacks the central nervous system, almost as if the body had become allergic to........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/11/2009 11:22:31 PM)


 

Low-carb diets linked to atherosclerosis

Low-carb diets linked to atherosclerosis
Even as low-carbohydrate/high-protein diets have proven successful at helping individuals rapidly lose weight, little is known about the diets' long-term effects on vascular health. Now, a study led by a scientific team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) provides some of the first data on this subject, demonstrating that mice placed on a 12-week low carbohydrate/high-protein diet showed a significant increase in atherosclerosis,........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 8/24/2009 10:41:26 PM)


Consumption of sugar substitutes assists weight control

Consumption of sugar substitutes assists weight control
A newly released study reported in the International Journal of Obesity reports that consumption of sugar-free beverages sweetened with low-calorie sweeteners increases dietary restraint, a key aspect of successful weight maintenance. Scientists analyzed calorie, protein, carbohydrate, fat and beverage intake, as well as the dietary restraint of over 300 individuals. The scientists concluded, "Our findingssuggest that the use of artificially........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 8/24/2009 10:39:12 PM)


How the modern world affects our tendency to share

How the modern world affects our tendency to share
From giving directions to a stranger to cooking a meal for loved ones, sharing is an essential part of the human experience. A newly released study in the Journal of Consumer Research unravels the complexities of sharing and examines how changes in our culture affect sharing. "Sharing is a fundamental consumer behavior that we have either tended to overlook or to confuse with commodity exchange and gift giving," writes author Russell Belk........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/24/2009 10:27:06 PM)


Why sleep?

Why sleep?
Bats, birds, box turtles, humans and a number of other animals share at least one thing in common: They sleep. Humans, in fact, spend roughly one-third of their lives asleep, but sleep scientists still don't know why. As per the journal Science, the function of sleep is one of the 125 greatest unsolved mysteries in science. Theories range from brain "maintenance" including memory consolidation and pruning to reversing damage from oxidative........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/21/2009 7:16:26 AM)


Universal Influenza Vaccination

Universal Influenza Vaccination
We all know that influenza vaccination helps prevent disease, but a newly released study from Canada suggests it may also prevent another public health problem: inappropriate antibiotic use. The findings come from a newly released study in the September 1, 2009 issue of Clinical Infectious Disease, which is now available online. Starting in 2000, the Canadian province of Ontario introduced a universal immunization program offering free........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/21/2009 7:11:57 AM)


Off-label use: Oft not evidence based

Off-label use: Oft not evidence based
In a recent national survey, a substantial minority of physicians erroneously believed that certain off-label uses of prescription drugs were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This mistaken belief could encourage them to prescribe these drugs, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting such use. "Off-label prescribing is common, but scientists have not always known why. Our research shows that some off-label prescribing........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/21/2009 7:05:36 AM)


New targets for treatment of invasive breast cancer

New targets for treatment of invasive breast cancer
Research led by Suresh Alahari, PhD, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, has demonstrated for the first time that a tiny piece of RNA appears to play a major role in the development of invasive breast cancer and identified a gene that appears to inhibit invasive breast cancer. The research is reported in the August 21, 2009 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry The........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 8/20/2009 7:04:42 AM)


Anti-Aging Gene Linked to High Blood Pressure

Anti-Aging Gene Linked to High Blood Pressure
Scientists at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center have shown the first link between a newly discovered anti-aging gene and high blood pressure. The results, which appear this month in the journal Hypertension, offer new clues on how we age and how we might live longer. Persistent hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a risk factor for stroke, heart attack, heart failure, arterial aneurysm and is the leading cause of chronic........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/20/2009 6:45:07 AM)


Majority of US hospitals will have smoke-free campuses

Majority of US hospitals will have smoke-free campuses
While hospital buildings are often smoke-free, a newly released study finds that by February 2008, 45 percent of US hospitals had adopted "smoke-free campus" policies, meaning that all the property owned or leased by the hospital, both indoors and outdoors, was smoke-free and there were no designated smoking areas on those properties. The study, "The Adoption of Smoke-Free Hospital Campuses in the United States," is the first of its kind to........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/20/2009 6:41:44 AM)


Neurons that control obesity in fruit flies

Neurons that control obesity in fruit flies
A team of researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have pinpointed two groups of neurons in fruit fly brains that have the ability to sense and manipulate the fly's fat stores in much the same way as do neurons in the mammalian brain. The existence of this sort of control over fat deposition and metabolic rates makes the flies a potentially useful model for the study of human obesity, the scientists note. Their........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 8/19/2009 7:19:18 AM)


Ancient Chinese herbal formulas on heart health

Ancient Chinese herbal formulas on heart health
New research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston suggests that ancient Chinese herbal formulas used primarily for cardiovascular indications including heart disease may produce large amounts of artery-widening nitric oxide. Findings of the preclinical study by researchers in the university's Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine for the Prevention of Human Diseases (IMM) appear in the Sept. 15 print issue of........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 8/18/2009 11:07:35 PM)


Milk is safe after treatment for milk allergy

Milk is safe after treatment for milk allergy
Some children with a history of severe milk allergy can safely drink milk and consume other dairy products every day, as per research led by the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and reported in the Aug. 10 online edition of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Investigators followed up with a subset of children who were part of an earlier Hopkins Children's-led study published in 2008 in which patients allergic to milk were given........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 8/18/2009 11:02:42 PM)


Video-game playing and health risks in adults

Video-game playing and health risks in adults
While video gaming is generally perceived as a pastime for children and young adults, research shows that the average age of players in the United States is 35. Investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emory University and Andrews University analyzed survey data from over 500 adults ranging in age from 19 to 90 in the Seattle-Tacoma area on health risks; media use behaviors and perceptions, including those........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/18/2009 7:54:23 AM)


Needle-free, inhalant powder measles vaccine

Needle-free, inhalant powder measles vaccine
The first dry powder inhalable vaccine for measles is moving toward clinical trials next year in India, where the disease still sickens millions of infants and children and kills almost 200,000 annually, as per a report presented here today at the 238th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Robert Sievers, Ph.D., who leads the team that developed the dry-powder vaccine, said it's a perfect fit for use in back-roads areas........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/16/2009 9:36:37 PM)


Up to 90 percent of US paper money contains traces of cocaine

Up to 90 percent of US paper money contains traces of cocaine
You probably have cocaine in your wallet, purse, or pocket. Sound unlikely or outrageous? Think again! In what scientists describe as the largest, most comprehensive analysis to date of cocaine contamination in banknotes, researchers are reporting that cocaine is present in up to 90 percent of paper money in the United States, especially in large cities such as Baltimore, Boston, and Detroit. The researchers found traces of cocaine in 95........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/16/2009 8:52:25 PM)


Brain innately separates living and non-living objects

Brain innately separates living and non-living objects
For unknown reasons, the human brain distinctly separates the handling of images of living things from images of non-living things, processing each image type in a different area of the brain. For years, a number of researchers have assumed the brain segregated visual information in this manner to optimize processing the images themselves, but new research shows that even in people who have been blind since birth the brain still separates the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/14/2009 7:19:28 AM)


Active ingredients in marijuana pread and prolong pain

Active ingredients in marijuana pread and prolong pain
Imagine that you're working on your back porch, hammering in a nail. Suddenly you slip and hit your thumb instead hard. The pain is incredibly intense, but it only lasts a moment. After a few seconds (and a few unprintable words) you're ready to start hammering again. How can such severe pain vanish so quickly? And why is it that other kinds of equally terrible pain refuse to go away, and instead torment their victims for years?. ........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/14/2009 7:15:58 AM)


Worth the effort?

Worth the effort?
New research indicates that decreased cravings for pleasure appears to be at the root of a core symptom of major depressive disorder. The research is in contrast to the long-held notion that those suffering from depression lack the ability to enjoy rewards, rather than the desire to seek them. The research, led by Vanderbilt psychology experts Michael Treadway and David Zald, was published Aug. 12 by the online journal PLoS One "This........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/13/2009 7:05:03 AM)


Cancer mortality rates experience steady decline

Cancer mortality rates experience steady decline
The number of cancer deaths has declined steadily in the last three decades. Eventhough younger people have experienced the steepest declines, all age groups have shown some improvement, as per a recent report in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. "Our efforts against cancer, including prevention, early detection and better therapy, have resulted in profound gains, but these gains are often........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 8/13/2009 6:53:47 AM)


Sleep patterns in children and teenagers could indicate risk for depression

Sleep patterns in children and teenagers could indicate risk for depression
Sleep patterns can help predict which adolescents might be at greatest risk for developing depression, a researcher at UT Southwestern Medical Center has found in a five-year study. Sleep is a biological factor known to be linked to adult depression. Depressed adults experience rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep earlier in the sleep cycle than people who are not depressed. Until this study, available online and in the July edition of........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/13/2009 6:50:07 AM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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