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Some Kids Are Being Misdiagnosed With Asthma

Some Kids Are Being Misdiagnosed With Asthma
Typically vocal cord dysfunction (vcd) is the sudden, abnormal narrowing of the vocal cords during inhalation causing obstruction of the airflow, and is characterized by a noise that can mimic the sound of wheezing. A VCD attack can easily be mistaken for an asthma attack though it does not respond to asthma medications. Treatment of VCD relies on correct identification of the disorder using breathing and relaxation techniques to help the........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 8/31/2007 5:01:08 AM)

Children stressed 6 months before starting school

Children stressed 6 months before starting school
The first few days at school can be an anxious time as children face the challenge of a new environment and making new friends but as per new research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, children show signs of stress three to six months before term even starts. The researchers, led by Dr Julie Turner-Cobb at the University of Bath, were studying the effect of childrens temperament and behaviour on how stressful they found the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/31/2007 4:52:21 AM)

You're likely to order more calories at a 'healthy' restaurant

You're likely to order more calories at a 'healthy' restaurant
An important new study from the Journal of Consumer Research explains the American obesity paradox: the parallel rise in obesity rates and the popularity of healthier food. In a series of four studies, the scientists reveal that we over-generalize healthy claims. In fact, consumers chose beverages, side dishes, and desserts containing up to 131% more calories when the main dish was positioned as healthy. In our black and white view, most........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 8/29/2007 9:53:48 PM)

New Nurses Report Significant Job Stress

New Nurses Report Significant Job Stress
What keeps a newly licensed nurse on the job? Answers to that question are important to hospitals across the U.S., a number of of which are confronting serious nursing shortages. Based on results of a study would be reported in the September 2007 issue of American Journal of Nursing, the top two priorities for hospitals to address the retention issue are improving nursing management and taking steps to reduce on-the-job stress. The study........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/29/2007 9:52:13 PM)

Influence of sex and handedness on brain

Influence of sex and handedness on brain
Capuchin monkeys are playful, inquisitive primates known for their manual dexterity, complex social behavior, and cognitive abilities. New research now shows that just like humans, they display a fundamental sex difference in the organization of the brain, specifically in the corpus callosum, the region that connects the two cerebral lobes. A recently published paper by Associate Professor of Psychology and Biology Kimberley A. Phillips........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/29/2007 9:49:37 PM)

Injuries of Football Season

Injuries of Football Season
Football Fever is upon the nation once again. The soaring of the pigskin signals the start of the "busy" season for cheerleaders, marching bands, and inevitably, sports medicine physicians. "After only a few days of practice at UB we've had three players with ACL injuries, a medial collateral ligament tear, a dislocated shoulder and a dislocated elbow," said Marc Fineberg, M.D., chief of sports medicine in the University at Buffalo School of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/29/2007 9:43:22 PM)

We Remember The Bad Times Better Than The Good

We Remember The Bad Times Better Than The Good
Do you remember exactly where you were when you learned of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks? Your answer is probably yes, and scientists are beginning to understand why we remember events that carry negative emotional weight. In the recent issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston College psychology expert, Elizabeth Kensinger and his colleagues, explain when emotion is........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/28/2007 9:47:35 PM)

A gene for metastasis

A gene for metastasis
Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the Western world. The tumor starts off as a polyp but then turns into an invasive and violent cancer, which often spreads to the liver. In an article recently reported in the journal Cancer Research, Prof. Avri Ben-Zeev and Dr. Nancy Gavert of the Weizmann Institutes Molecular Cell Biology Department reveal mechanisms that help this cancer metastasize. In a majority of cases,........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 8/28/2007 9:10:11 PM)

Innovative Surgery For Sleep Apnea

Innovative Surgery For Sleep Apnea
Sleep disorder and ear, nose and throat specialists at Thomas Jefferson University are examining an innovative procedure to treat obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. In the procedure, known as Genial Bone Advancement Trephine (GBAT), a small portion of the lower jaw which attaches to the tongue is moved forward, to pull the tongue away from the back of the airway, increasing the airway space. It is considered an option for patients when........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/28/2007 8:58:41 PM)

Hospital Practices Affect Long-Term Breastfeeding Success

Hospital Practices Affect Long-Term Breastfeeding Success
Breast milk and breastfeeding are recognized to be the ideal choices of nutrition and feeding for infants. Breastfeeding is the normal method of feeding infants, and provides a number of benefits to both infants and mothers. In addition to receiving essential nutrients, breastfed infants have lower rates of ear infections, gastroenteritis, asthma, obesity and diabetes. Benefits for mothers include decreased occurence rate of breast and ovary........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 8/28/2007 8:43:18 PM)

Clues To Obsessive-compulsive Disorder

Clues To Obsessive-compulsive Disorder
Mice born without a key brain protein compulsively groom their faces until they bleed and are afraid to venture out of the corner of their cages. When given a replacement dose of the protein in a specific region of the brain, or the drugs used to treat humans suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a number of of these mice seem to get better. Duke University Medical Center investigators, in their basic research into how........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/26/2007 10:42:59 AM)

Those student-athletes at risk for developing OSA

Those student-athletes at risk for developing OSA
For most children and teens, the beginning of a new school year is just around the corner. Not only will they be hitting the books again after a three-month-long summer break, but a number of of them will also participate in after-school activities. More research is emerging that sheds light on a serious problem affecting student-athletes nationwide: the number of children and teens who are considered obese is rising dramatically. As per the........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/25/2007 6:25:56 AM)

Bipolar disorder relapses halved

Bipolar disorder relapses halved
Melbourne mental health scientists have succeeded in halving the number of relapses experienced by people with bipolar disorder which strikes two in 100 Australians, accounts for 12 per cent of suicides each year and costs the country at least $1.5 billion annually(1). With funding from the MBF Foundation and Beyond Blue, a team led by the Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria has developed an innovative structured group program to........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/24/2007 5:08:04 AM)

MSU engineering team designs innovative medical device

MSU engineering team designs innovative medical device
A Michigan State University engineering design team has developed a medical diagnosis system that would allow people to be inexpensively screened for a variety of medical problems. With Tongtong Li, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, as the faculty facilitator, Joe Hines, Janelle Shane, Kevin Scheel, Thomas Casey and Kurtis Hessler teamed up with students from China and Italy in the project. The device will........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 8/24/2007 5:06:52 AM)

Cranberries may improve chemotherapy for ovarian cancer

Cranberries may improve chemotherapy for ovarian cancer
Compounds in cranberries may help improve the effectiveness of platinum drugs that are used in chemotherapy to fight ovary cancer, scientists have found in a laboratory study that will be reported today at the 234th national meeting of the American Chemical Society. The researchers demonstrated in cell culture studies that human ovary cancer cells resistant to platinum drugs became up to 6 times more sensitized to the drugs after exposure to........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 8/21/2007 6:33:07 PM)

Sewage tells tales about community-wide drug abuse

Sewage tells tales about community-wide drug abuse
Public health officials may soon be able to flush out more accurate estimates on illegal drug use in communities across the country thanks to screening test described here today at the 234th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the worlds largest scientific society. The test doesnt screen people, it seeks out evidence of illicit drug abuse in drug residues and metabolites excreted in urine and flushed toward municipal sewage........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/21/2007 6:30:17 PM)

Optimal drug dose of common anticoagulant

Optimal drug dose of common anticoagulant
Genetic testing can be used to help personalize the therapeutic dosage of warfarin, a commonly-used anticoagulant, as per research reported in the September 1, 2007, issue of Blood, the journal of the American Society of Hematology. This result represents one of the first applications of using an individuals genetic information to guide personal medical care. Because individuals metabolize drugs differently, varying doses of warfarin are........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 8/21/2007 5:43:01 PM)

Nonmedicinal treatment for preschoolers with ADHD

Nonmedicinal treatment for preschoolers with ADHD
Non-medicinal interventions are highly effective in preventing the behavioral and academic problems linked to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), as per a five-year study led by scientists at Lehigh Universitys College of Education. The study, titled Project Achieve and funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), was the largest of its kind focusing on children aged 3 to 5 who have shown significant symptoms of........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 8/21/2007 5:19:36 PM)

Vitamin D In Fighting Cancer

Vitamin D In Fighting Cancer
A new study looking at the relationship between vitamin D serum levels and the risk of colon and breast cancer across the globe has estimated the number of cases of cancer that could be prevented each year if vitamin D3 levels met the target proposed by researchers. Cedric F. Garland, Dr.P.H., cancer prevention specialist at the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and his colleagues estimate that 250,000........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 8/21/2007 5:03:52 PM)

High alcohol consumption increases stroke risk

High alcohol consumption increases stroke risk
In a study likely applicable to men of other ethnicities, Tulane University scientists observed that heavy drinking (more than 21 drinks per week) may increase the risk of stroke in Chinese men. The results of the study are reported in the latest issue of Annals of Neurology. Scientists led by Lydia Bazzano of Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine recently examined the relationship between alcohol consumption and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/20/2007 9:34:54 PM)

 

HPV vaccines may decrease risk of oral cancer

HPV vaccines may decrease risk of oral cancer
The Centers for Disease Control report that nearly 25 million women are infected with some form of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Of those, more than three million are thought to have one of the four strains known to cause cases of cervical cancer and genital warts. HPV is associated with oropharyngeal cancer and may be associated with oral cancers as well, and vaccines that have been developed to treat HPV might decrease the risk of........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 8/31/2007 5:04:49 AM)

Underage drinking starts before adolescence

Underage drinking starts before adolescence
As schools reopen around the country, a new study finds that parents and teachers should pay attention to alcohol prevention starting as early as fourth grade. A review of national and statewide surveys conducted over the last 15 years shows that among typical 4th graders, 10% have already had more than a sip of alcohol and 7% have had a drink in the past year. While the numbers are small in the fourth grade, the surveys show that the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/31/2007 4:54:11 AM)

New Targets For Antibiotics

New Targets For Antibiotics
University of Illinois at Chicago scientists have identified new sites on the bacterial cell's protein-making machinery where antibiotics can be delivered to treat infections. "The primary challenge of antibiotic treatment has been fighting infections caused by the pathogens which became resistant to antibiotics," says Alexander Mankin, professor and associate director of UIC's Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and lead investigator of........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/30/2007 9:25:34 PM)

New Strategies For Antibiotic Resistance

New Strategies For Antibiotic Resistance
With infections increasingly resistant to even the most modern antibiotics, scientists at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed) report in the recent issue of Nature Reviews Microbiology on new clues they have uncovered in immune system molecules that defend against infection. Drs. Michael R. Yeaman and Nannette Y. Yount present evidence that small proteins in the immune systems of humans and........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/29/2007 9:50:54 PM)

Discovery could help stop malaria at its source

Discovery could help stop malaria at its source
As summer temperatures cool in the United States, fewer mosquitoes whir around our tiki torches. But mosquitoes swarming around nearly 40 percent of the worlds population will continue to spread a deadly parasitic disease malaria. Now an interdisciplinary team led by scientists from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has found a key link that causes malarial infection in both humans and mosquitoes. If this link in the chain of infection can........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/29/2007 9:45:01 PM)

Mothers' baby cradling habits are indicator of stress

Mothers' baby cradling habits are indicator of stress
Mothers who cradle their baby to their right hand side are displaying signs of extreme stress, a new study suggests. Eventhough most mums feel stressed in the early stages of their babys life, the study by Durham University scientists suggests their baby cradling habits are a key indicator of whether this stress could become overwhelming and lead to depression. Prior research has already shown that the majority of mothers prefer to cradle........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/28/2007 9:51:00 PM)

Hypnosis reduces pain in breast cancer surgery

Hypnosis reduces pain in breast cancer surgery
The use of hypnosis previous to breast cancer surgery reduced the amount of anesthesia administered during the operation, the level of pain reported afterwards, and the time and cost of the procedure, as per a research studypublished online August 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Breast cancer surgery patients often suffer side effects such as pain, nausea, and fatigue during and after their operation. These complications........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 8/28/2007 9:32:49 PM)

More prostate cancer screening has little effect

More prostate cancer screening has little effect
More prostate cancers were detected among men who were screened every two years than men screened every four years, as per a research studypublished online August 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute But the shorter time between screenings did not reduce the number of aggressive cancers found between the scheduled screening tests. Since the introduction of PSA (prostate specific antigen) testing in the late 1980s, the occurence........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 8/28/2007 9:26:37 PM)

Not all risk is created equal

Not all risk is created equal
A camper who chases a grizzly but won't risk unprotected sex. A sky diver afraid to stand up to the boss. New research shows that not all risk is created equal and people show a mixture of both risky and non-risky behaviors. The survey also shows that men are significantly riskier than women overall. The University of Michigan research refutes the standard theories of risk that group people as either risk-seeking or risk-avoiding, and........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/28/2007 8:49:18 PM)

Link Between Zinc And Macular Degeneration

Link Between Zinc And Macular Degeneration
A team of scientists, including three scientists at George Mason University, observed that the mineral zinc could play a role in the development of macular degeneration. In studying eye tissue samples, the researches observed that deposits, that are hallmarks of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), contain large amounts of zinc. This finding, reported in the journal Experimental Eye Research, might be especially important because zinc........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 8/27/2007 8:28:06 PM)

First Out-of-body Experience In Laboratory

First Out-of-body Experience In Laboratory
A neuroscientist working at UCL (University College London) has devised the first experimental method to induce an out-of-body experience in healthy participants. In a paper published in Science, Dr Henrik Ehrsson, UCL Institute of Neurology, outlines the unique method by which the illusion is created and the implications of its discovery. An out-of-body experience (OBE) is defined as the experience in which a person who is awake sees his or........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/26/2007 10:58:25 AM)

Novel Approach to Uncover Genetic Components of Aging

Novel Approach to Uncover Genetic Components of Aging
People who live to 100 or more are known to have just as a number of-and sometimes even more-harmful gene variants compared with younger people. Now, researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have discovered the secret behind this paradox: favorable "longevity" genes that protect very old people from the bad genes' harmful effects. The novel method used by the scientists could lead to new drugs to protect........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 8/25/2007 6:27:48 AM)

Single-incision belly-button surgery to remove kidney

Single-incision belly-button surgery to remove kidney
Surgeons specializing in laparoscopic procedures at UT Southwestern Medical Center have successfully removed a patients kidney by performing a unique nephrectomy entirely through the belly button. Dr. Jeffrey Cadeddu, associate professor of urology and radiology, performed the single keyhole access surgery, the first of its kind involving a kidney. The entire procedure was completed with only one incision and will leave the patient with a........Go to the Kidney watch blog (Added on 8/24/2007 5:10:05 AM)

Surgery for severe obesity saves lives

Surgery for severe obesity saves lives
An extensive swedish study from the Sahlgrenska Academy has established that surgery reduces premature death in patients with severe obesity. A long-term follow up has shown that mortality is significantly lower among patients who undergo surgery than among those who do not. The results are published recently in The New England Journal (NEJM). We show for the first time that surgery against obesity not only leads to long-term loss of........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 8/23/2007 10:37:42 PM)

Techniques For Better Learning

Techniques For Better Learning
People have incredible amounts to learn throughout their lives, whether it be preparing for a test in middle school or training for a new job late in life. Given that time is often at a premium, being able to efficiently learn new information is important. One way people can learn efficiently is to accurately evaluate their learning and decide how to proceed. For example, if you were studying for a final exam, you could most efficiently use........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/23/2007 10:22:33 PM)

Vaccine thwarts the tangles of Alzheimer's

Vaccine thwarts the tangles of Alzheimer's
A new study by NYU Medical Center scientists shows for the first time that the immune system can combat the pathological form of tau protein, a key protein implicated in Alzheimers disease. The researchers, led by Einar Sigurdsson Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Pathology at New York University School of Medicine, created a vaccine in mice that suppresses aggregates of tau. The protein accumulates into harmful tangles in the memory........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/21/2007 6:08:39 PM)

Baby talk is universal

Baby talk is universal
A major function of speech is the communication of intentions. In everyday conversation between adults, intentions are conveyed through multiple channels, including the syntax and semantics of the language, but also through nonverbal vocal cues such as pitch, loudness, and rate of speech. The same thing occurs when we talk to infants. Regardless of the language we speak, most adults, for example, raise their voices to elicit the infants........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 8/21/2007 5:44:29 PM)

AIDS vaccine field moves toward larger-scale efficacy trials

AIDS vaccine field moves toward larger-scale efficacy trials
Leading scientists from the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Military HIV Research Program (USMHRP) presented final results today from a collection of independent studies reexamining the medical criteria for including African volunteers in AIDS vaccine trials. The findings, presented at the AIDS Vaccine 2007 Conference in Seattle, suggest that a number of........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/21/2007 5:34:56 PM)

Newborn In-hospital Weight Loss

Newborn In-hospital Weight Loss
Healthy, full-term newborn babies tend to lose weight during the first few days after their birth. A groundbreaking new study reported in the latest issue of the Journal of Human Lactation explores the reasons why certain newborns lose more (or less) than others and what conclusions can be drawn from the research. The purpose of the study, published by SAGE in the Journal of Human Lactation, for the International Lactation Consultant........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 8/21/2007 5:18:04 PM)

Women lose weight before developing dementia

Women lose weight before developing dementia
Women who have dementia start losing weight at least 10 years before the disease is diagnosed, as per a research studyreported in the August 21, 2007, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The scientists examined the records of 481 people with dementia and compared them to 481 people of the same age and gender who did not have dementia. The average weight was the same for those in the two groups from........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/20/2007 9:42:37 PM)

 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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