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How carrots help us see the color orange

How carrots help us see the color orange
One of the easiest ways to identify an object is by its color -- perhaps it is because children's books encourage us to pair certain objects with their respective colors. Why else would so a number of of us automatically assume carrots are orange, grass is green and apples are red? In two experiments by Holger Mitterer and Jan Peter de Ruiter from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, perception of color and color constancy (the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/22/2008 8:30:44 PM)


Has Cancer Spread?

Has Cancer Spread?
For patients with head and neck cancer, accurately determining how advanced the cancer is and detecting secondary cancers commonly means undergoing numerous tests - until now. New Saint Louis University research has observed that the PET-Computerized axial tomography scanner can be used as a stand-alone tool to detect secondary cancers, which occur in 5 to 10 percent of head and neck cancer patients. The study findings, which were presented........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/22/2008 7:57:10 PM)


More lymph nodes linked to cancer survival

More lymph nodes linked to cancer survival
Why do patients with gastric or pancreas cancer live longer when they are treated at cancer centers or high-volume hospitals than patients treated at low-volume or community hospitals?. New research from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine observed that cancer patients have more lymph nodes examined for the spread of their disease if they are treated at hospitals performing more cancer surgeries or those designated as........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/22/2008 7:53:57 PM)


Beijing pollution may trigger heart attacks

Beijing pollution may trigger heart attacks
Olympic athletes aren't the only ones who need to be concerned about the heavily polluted air in Beijing. The dirty air may trigger serious cardiovascular problems for some spectators. Two scientists in pulmonary medicine and critical care at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine warn that for people in certain risk groups, breathing high levels of pollution can cause heart attacks and strokes within 24 hours of exposure and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/21/2008 9:36:52 PM)


Loud music can make you drink more

Loud music can make you drink more
Commercial venues are very aware of the effects that the environment in this case, music can have on in-store traffic flow, sales volumes, product choices, and consumer time spent in the immediate vicinity. A study of the effects of music levels on drinking in a bar setting has observed that loud music leads to more drinking in less time. Results would be reported in the recent issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research and are........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/20/2008 5:00:29 PM)


Refuting common stereotypes about obese workers

Refuting common stereotypes about obese workers
New research led by a Michigan State University scholar refutes usually held stereotypes that overweight workers are lazier, more emotionally unstable and harder to get along with than their "normal weight" colleagues. With the findings, employers are urged to guard against the use of weight-based stereotypes when it comes to hiring, promoting or firing. Mark Roehling, associate professor of human resource management, and two colleagues........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/20/2008 4:57:07 PM)


Too much, too little sleep increases ischemic risk

Too much, too little sleep increases ischemic risk
Postmenopausal women who regularly sleep more than nine hours a night may have an increased risk of ischemic stroke, scientists reported in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. In comparison to women sleeping seven hours, the risk of ischemic stroke was 60-70 percent higher for those sleeping nine hours or more, said lead author Jiu-Chiuan Chen, M.D., Sc.D., assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of North........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/17/2008 9:41:23 PM)


Bullying-suicide link explored in new study

Bullying-suicide link explored in new study
Scientists at Yale School of Medicine have found signs of an apparent correlation between bullying, being bullied and suicide in children, as per a new review of studies from 13 countries reported in the International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health "While there is no definitive evidence that bullying makes kids more likely to kill themselves, now that we see there's a likely association, we can act on it and try to prevent it,"........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/17/2008 9:14:08 PM)


Low-fat diets not best for weight loss

Low-fat diets not best for weight loss
A two-year study led by scientists from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) reveals that low-carbohydrate and Mediterranean diets may be just as safe and effective in achieving weight loss as the standard, medically prescribed low-fat diet, as per a new study reported in the prestigious New England Journal (NEJM) The study was conducted by BGU and the Nuclear Research Center in Dimona, Israel, in collaboration with Harvard University,........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/16/2008 9:05:25 PM)


Magnetic Nanoparticles to Combat Cancer

Magnetic Nanoparticles to Combat Cancer
Researchers at Georgia Tech have developed a potential new therapy against cancer that attaches magnetic nanoparticles to cancer cells, allowing them to be captured and carried out of the body. The therapy, which has been tested in the laboratory and will now be looked at in survival studies, is detailed online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. "We've been able to use magnetic nanoparticles to capture free-floating cancer........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/16/2008 8:33:03 PM)


Ways Circadian Disruption Affects Human Health

Ways Circadian Disruption Affects Human Health
Growing evidence indicates that exposure to irregular patterns of light and darkness can cause the human circadian system to fall out of synchrony with the 24-hour solar day, negatively affecting human health - but researchers have been unable to effectively study the relationship between circadian disruptions and human maladies. A study by scientists in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Lighting Research Center (LRC) provides a new........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/16/2008 8:10:05 PM)


Why We Overestimate Future Choices

Why We Overestimate Future Choices
When people make choices for future consumption, they select a wider variety than when they plan to immediately consume the products. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research examines the reasons behind this diversification of choices. "Consumers' tendency to diversify their choices more for future than for present consumption has been demonstrated to be a robust phenomenon and to occur in a variety of situations," write authors Linda........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/16/2008 7:15:02 PM)


Caesarean section: no consensus on best technique

Caesarean section: no consensus on best technique
Despite the routine delivery of babies by caesarean section, there is no consensus among medical practitioners on which is the best operating method to use. In a systematic review published in The Cochrane Library, scientists call for further studies to establish the safest method for both mother and infant. "Caesarean section is a very common operation, yet there is a lack of high quality information available to inform best practice,"........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 7/15/2008 10:40:55 PM)


Men and women are wired differently

Men and women are wired differently
Temptation may be everywhere, but it's how the different sexes react to flirtation that determines the effect it will have on their relationships. In a new study, psychology experts determined men tend to look at their partners in a more negative light after meeting a single, attractive woman. Conversely, women are likelier to work to strengthen their current relationships after meeting an available, attractive man. Men may not see their........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/15/2008 10:19:06 PM)


Gene signatures for scleroderma

Gene signatures for scleroderma
Distinct genetic profiles can discern different groups of patients with scleroderma, a vexing autoimmune disease in which the body turns against itself, Dartmouth Medical School scientists report. Their discovery of distinguishing molecular subtypes within the disease offers new insight into the complexity of a poorly understood and hard to treat illness and opens a window for better diagnosis and targeted therapies. Scleroderma is a chronic........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/15/2008 9:22:48 PM)


Vitamin A pushes breast cancer to form blood vessel cells

Vitamin A pushes breast cancer to form blood vessel cells
Scientists at Georgetown University Medical Center have discovered that vitamin A, when applied to breast cancer cells, turns on genes that can push stem cells embedded in a tumor to morph into endothelial cells. These cells can then build blood vessels to link up to the body's blood supply, promoting further tumor growth. They say their findings, reported in the July 16 online issue of PLoS ONE, is a proof of principle of the new and........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/15/2008 9:18:06 PM)


Exercise may prevent brain shrinkage in early

Exercise may prevent brain shrinkage in early
Mild Alzheimer's disease patients with higher physical fitness had larger brains in comparison to mild Alzheimer's patients with lower physical fitness, as per a research studyreported in the July 15, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. For the study, 121 people age 60 and older underwent fitness tests using a treadmill as well as brain scans to measure the white matter, gray matter and total........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/14/2008 9:50:52 PM)


Coronary heart disease patients live longer, but not always happier

Coronary heart disease patients live longer, but not always happier
Better therapys have improved survival in people with coronary heart disease, but the quality of those extra years may be less than ideal, as per research reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. Compared with adults without coronary heart disease (CHD), adults with CHD scored up to 9 percent lower on four scales measuring "quality of life." Patients with coronary heart disease were more likely to say they had........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/14/2008 9:40:38 PM)


Who responds best to an antidepressant

Who responds best to an antidepressant
A new Mayo Clinic study shows that variations in the serotonin transporter gene could explain why some people with depression respond better than others to therapy with citalopram (Celexa), an antidepressant medication. The study, in the current issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, examined the serotonin transporter gene, or SLC6A4, in 1,914 study participants. The study showed that two........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/14/2008 4:47:23 PM)


GNicotine addiction may be in your genes

GNicotine addiction may be  in your genes
Common genetic variations affecting nicotine receptors in the nervous system can significantly increase the chance that European Americans who begin smoking by age 17 will struggle with life-long nicotine addiction. Published July 11 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, this research led by researchers at the University of Utah together with colleagues from the University of Wisconsin highlights the importance of preventing early........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/10/2008 9:48:05 PM)


 

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Could Slow Acute Wound Healing

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Could Slow Acute Wound Healing
A recent study shows that popular fish oil supplements have an effect on the healing process of small, acute wounds in human skin. But whether that effect is detrimental, as scientists initially suspected, remains a mystery. The omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oils are widely considered to benefit cardiovascular health and other diseases correlation to chronic inflammation because of their anti-inflammatory properties. But insufficient........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 7/23/2008 4:24:25 PM)


No need for gene screens in breast cancer families

No need for gene screens in breast cancer families
Research reported today should provide relief to women who are worried after a relative's breast cancer diagnosis. The study in the open access journal BMC Cancer shows that a family history of breast cancer does not give a useful indication of the likelihood that a woman will develop it herself at an early age. An increased risk of breast cancer for relatives of patients with breast cancer has been demonstrated in a number of studies. As........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/22/2008 8:03:15 PM)


Does too much sun cause melanoma?

Does too much sun cause melanoma?
We are continuously bombarded with messages about the dangers of too much sun and the increased risk of melanoma (the less common and deadliest form of skin cancer), but are these dangers real, or is staying out of the sun causing us more harm than good? Two experts debate the issue on BMJ.com today. Sam Shuster, a consultant dermatologist at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, says that sun exposure is the major cause of the common........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 7/22/2008 7:55:10 PM)


New breast cancer test under study

New breast cancer test under study
Whether a painless, portable device that uses electrical current rather than X-ray to look for breast cancer could be an alternative to traditional mammograms is under study at the Medical College of Georgia. MCG is one of 20 centers internationally and the only place in Georgia studying new technology developed by Z-Tech Inc., to compare traditional mammograms with impedence scanning, a technique based on evidence that electrical current........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/22/2008 7:48:14 PM)


Enzyme expression levels and chemotherapy drug response

Enzyme expression levels and chemotherapy drug response
Why do cancer patients develop resistance to chemotherapy drugs, sometimes abruptly, after a period in which the drugs seem to be working well to reduce tumors or hold them in check? Eventhough largely a mystery to scientists, the result when this occurs is all too familiar: patients relapse and in a number of cases die when their cancers become resistant. A team of scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), seeking to understand........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/20/2008 4:58:42 PM)


An ID for Alzheimer's?

An ID for Alzheimer's?
Every aging baby boomer listens for the footsteps of Alzheimer's, and for good reason: It's estimated that 10 million American boomers will develop the disease. The need to develop preventative strategies, ideally long before Alzheimer's destructive, clinical symptoms appear, is critical. In furthering the steps toward that goal, UCLA associate professor of neurology John Ringman and colleagues confirm in the current issue of the journal........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/19/2008 10:14:58 AM)


Saltwater olives

Saltwater olives
The news that olives are sources of "good fat" has increased worldwide demand for the luscious, versatile fruits. Olives have become extremely popular, enjoyed as condiments, appetizers, spreads, and additions to salads and sauces. Their heart-healthy oil has is also enjoying superstar status in kitchens around the world. The olive's reputation as a health food is being borne out by modern science, as studies of olive-consuming Mediterranean........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/17/2008 9:37:36 PM)


Elderly falls cut by 11 percent with education and intervention

Elderly falls cut by 11 percent with education and intervention
Usually viewed as an inevitable consequence of aging and often ignored in clinical practice, falls among the elderly were cut by 11 percent when scientists at Yale School of Medicine used a combination of fall prevention educational campaigns and interventions aimed at encouraging clinicians to incorporate fall-risk assessment and management into their practices. Reported in the July 17 New England Journal (NEJM), the study also observed........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/17/2008 9:15:53 PM)


Men and women may need different diets

Men and women may need different diets
Diet can strongly influence how long you live and your reproductive success, but now researchers have discovered that what works for males can be very different for females. In the first study of its kind, the scientists have shown that gender plays a major role in determining which diet is better suited to promoting longer life or better reproductive success. In the evolutionary "battle of the sexes", traits that benefit males are costly........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/16/2008 8:58:18 PM)


Many Patients In A Fog After ER Visit

Many Patients In A Fog After ER Visit
Every year, more than 115 million patients enter emergency rooms at hospitals around the nation. And more than three-quarters of them leave with an impression of what happened or what should happen next that doesn't match what their emergency care team would want. That's the finding of a new study led by University of Michigan Health System researchers, and published early online in the Annals of Emergency Medicine The results suggest that........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/16/2008 8:36:49 PM)


Teen smokers struggle to kick the habit

Teen smokers struggle to kick the habit
Most teenagers who smoke cigarettes make repeated attempts to quit but most are unsuccessful, as per new research from the Universit de Montral and funded by the Canadian Cancer Society. "The study observed that teen smokers make their first serious attempt to quit after only two and a half months of smoking, and by the time they have smoked for 21 months they have lost confidence in their ability to quit," says Dr. Jennifer O'Loughlin, the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/16/2008 7:48:43 PM)


Can you be born a couch potato?

Can you be born a couch potato?
The key to good health is to be physically active. The key to being active is to be born that way? The well-documented importance of exercise in maintaining fitness has created the idea that individuals can manage their health by increasing their activity. But what if the inclination to engage in physical activity is itself significantly affected by factors that are predetermined? Two new studies suggest that the inclination to exercise may........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/16/2008 7:38:12 PM)


Cognitive Behavior Therapy For Chronic Fatigue

Cognitive Behavior Therapy For Chronic Fatigue
Cognitive behaviour treatment is effective in treating the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, as per a recent systematic review carried out by Cochrane Researchers. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a potentially long-lasting illness that can cause considerable distress and disability. Some estimates suggest it may affect as a number of as 1 in 100 of the population globally. There is no widely accepted explanation for the disease and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/15/2008 10:43:07 PM)


Peers important for nutrition education

Peers important for nutrition education
A systematic literature review conducted by a team of scientists from the University of Connecticut, the Hispanic Health Council (Hartford), and the Connecticut Center for Eliminating Health Disparities among Latinos assessed the impact of peer education/counseling on nutrition and health outcomes among Latinos living in the United States. The results, reported in the July/recent issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, provide........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/15/2008 10:29:54 PM)


Regular walking nearly halves elderly disability risk

Regular walking nearly halves elderly disability risk
Elderly adults can decrease their risk of disability and increase their likelihood of maintaining independence by 41 percent by participating in a walking exercise program, as per a new University of Georgia study. The study, which appears in the current issue of the Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, also observed that walking program participants increased their peak aerobic capacity by 19 percent when in comparison to a control group........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/15/2008 9:40:22 PM)


Pinpointing Achilles Heel of HIV

Pinpointing Achilles Heel of HIV
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) scientists at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston believe they have uncovered the Achilles heel in the armor of the virus that continues to kill millions. The weak spot is hidden in the HIV envelope protein gp120. This protein is essential for HIV attachment to host cells, which initiate infection and eventually lead to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or AIDS. Normally the body's immune........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/15/2008 9:20:22 PM)


Colorectal cancer screening rates still too low

Colorectal cancer screening rates still too low
Eventhough colorectal cancer screening tests are proven to reduce colorectal cancer mortality, only about half of U.S. men and women 50 and older receive the recommended tests, as per a report in the July 2008 issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a National Health Interview Survey and found only 50 percent........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 7/14/2008 9:48:32 PM)


Passive Learning Too Imprints On The Brain

Passive Learning Too Imprints On The Brain
It's conventional wisdom that practice makes perfect. But if practicing only consists of watching, rather than doing, does that advance proficiency? Yes, as per a research studyby Dartmouth researchers. In a study titled "Sensitivity of the Action Observation Network to Physical and Observational Learning" reported in the journal Cerebral Cortex in May 2008, Dartmouth scientists determined that people can acquire motor skills through the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/14/2008 5:15:58 PM)


Asians who immigrated to US before age 25

Asians who immigrated to US before age 25
Asian-American immigrants who came to the United States before they were 25 years old have poorer mental health than their compatriots who came to this country when they were 25 or older, as per data from the first national mental health survey of Asian-Americans. The study is noteworthy because it shows that using traditional measures of socio-economic status number of years of school and household income to predict health outcomes is........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/14/2008 4:21:32 PM)


Rx for time-crunched physicians

Rx for time-crunched physicians
With their waiting rooms crowded and exam rooms full, a number of physicians say they are too busy to be good communicators. Those who study doctor time-management think otherwise. Certain communication skills can foster efficiency and effectiveness during an office visit without sacrificing rapport with patients, as per scientists at the University of Washington (UW) and the University of Rochester. Their guide to a smoother flow of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/14/2008 4:14:05 PM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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