MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of society medical news blog


Go Back to the main society medical news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Society Medical News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


September 30, 2009, 7:00 AM CT

NFL players not more likely to develop heart disease

NFL players not more likely to develop heart disease
Former professional football players with large bodies don't appear to have the same risk factors for heart disease as their non-athletic counterparts, UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have found in studying a group of National Football League (NFL) alumni.

In comparison to other men in a similar age range, retired NFL players had a significantly lower prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, sedentary lifestyles and metabolic syndrome, the study authors report. The scientific findings are reported in the recent issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

"Despite their large body size, retired NFL players do not have a greater prevalence of heart disease risk factors when in comparison to the general population," said Dr. Alice Chang, assistant professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern and the study's main author. "In fact, other factors such as age and high cholesterol levels were better predictors for heart disease than the body size of the former athletes in our study".

When body mass index (BMI) standards are applied, more than half of all professional football players are considered overweight or obese, which is considered an indicator for heart disease risk. Dr. Chang said eventhough a majority of these players are not as fit and active after retirement, they still had fewer risk factors for heart disease than men of the same age and body size from the Dallas Heart Study, a groundbreaking investigation of cardiovascular disease that involves thousands of Dallas County residents.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 30, 2009, 6:56 AM CT

How old is your muscle?

How old is your muscle?
Young, healthy muscle (left column) appears pink and red. In contrast, the old muscle is marked by scarring and inflammation, as evidenced by the yellow and blue areas. This difference between old and young tissue occurs both in the muscle's normal state and after two weeks of immobilization in a cast. Exercise after cast removal did not significantly improve old muscle regeneration; scarring and inflammation persisted, or worsened in many cases.

Credit: Photos by Morgan E. Carlson and Irina M. Conboy, UC Berkeley

A study led by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, has identified critical biochemical pathways associated with the aging of human muscle. By manipulating these pathways, the scientists were able to turn back the clock on old human muscle, restoring its ability to repair and rebuild itself.

The findings will be published in the Sept. 30 issue of the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine, a peer-evaluated, scientific publication of the European Molecular Biology Organization.

"Our study shows that the ability of old human muscle to be maintained and repaired by muscle stem cells can be restored to youthful vigor given the right mix of biochemical signals," said Professor Irina Conboy, a faculty member in the graduate bioengineering program that is run jointly by UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco, and head of the research team conducting the study. "This provides promising new targets for forestalling the debilitating muscle atrophy that accompanies aging, and perhaps other tissue degenerative disorders as well".

Prior research in animal models led by Conboy, who is also an investigator at the Berkeley Stem Cell Center and at the California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3), revealed that the ability of adult stem cells to do their job of repairing and replacing damaged tissue is governed by the molecular signals they get from surrounding muscle tissue, and that those signals change with age in ways that preclude productive tissue repair.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


September 30, 2009, 6:53 AM CT

Those overweight middle-aged women

Those overweight middle-aged women
Women who put on weight as they approach middle-age could reduce their chances of enjoying a healthy old age by up to 80%, as per research from the University of Warwick.

The study, published recently (Wednesday) in the British Medical Journal, suggests that women who have a high body mass index in middle age are significantly more likely to suffer from major chronic diseases such as cancer and coronary heart disease and poor quality of life.

Dr Oscar Franco, Assistant Clinical Professor of Public Health at Warwick Medical School collaborated on the paper with scientists from Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts.

The research team observed that for every 1kg gained in weight since the age of 18, the odds of healthy survival into old age decreased by 5%.

They also observed that women who were overweight at the age of 18 and continued to gain weight as they grew older were most at risk of developing a major chronic disease. Obese women with a body mass index of more than 25kg/m2 had 79% lower odds of aging without developing a chronic disease, in comparison to women with a body mass index of 18.5-22.9kg/m2.

The research team used the Nurses' Health Study, which has gathered data from more than 120,000 female registered nurses living in 11 US states since 1976. Follow-up questionnaires have been sent out every two years to update information on disease incidence and lifestyle factors.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 30, 2009, 6:42 AM CT

HIV-AIDS in American prison system

HIV-AIDS in American prison system
HIV/Aids is up to five times more prevalent in American prisons than in the general population. Adherence to therapy programs can be strictly monitored in prison. However, once prisoners are released, medical monitoring becomes problematic. A newly released study by Dr. Nitika Pant Pai an Assistant professor of Medicine and a medical scientist at the Research Institute of the MUHC suggests the majority (76%) of inmates take their antiretroviral therapy (ART) intermittently once they leave prison, representing a higher risk to the general population.

"Over a period of 9 years, we studied 512 HIV positive repeat offender inmates from the San Francisco County jail system," says Dr. Pant Pai. "Our results show that only 15% continuously took their ART between incarcerations or after their release." As per the study, reported in the journal PLoS one, these figures highlight a lack of effectiveness on the part of medical monitoring services for these people outside prison.

"Taking ART intermittently is a problem because it depletes the CD4 count - the immunizing cells that fight infection and increases the probability of developing resistance to the virus," says Dr. Pant Pai. "The risk for rapid disease progression becomes higher and presents a risk for public health transmission of HIV to their partners." As per the study those on intermittent treatment were 1.5 times more likely to have higher virus load than those on continuous treatment; those who never received treatment were 3 times more likely to have a higher VL.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


September 29, 2009, 10:47 PM CT

Eat Soybeans to Prevent Diseases

Eat Soybeans to Prevent Diseases
Soybeans contain high levels of several health-beneficial compounds including tocopherols, which have antioxidant properties. These molecules can be used in the development of functional foods, which have specific health-beneficial properties and can be used in the therapy or prevention of diseases. Tocopherols exist in four forms (a, ß, ?, and d) of which ?-tocopherol is found in greatest concentration in soybeans. However, a-tocopherol has the greatest antioxidant activity, and is the form converted to vitamin E in the human body. Thus, most interest for soybean tocopherols resides in a-tocopherol; however, certain health-properties have also been attributed to other tocopherol forms and interest for these remains. It has been suggested that all tocopherols could play a role in cardiovascular diseases and cancer prevention.

Eventhough few studies have determined soybean tocopherols concentration in a range of genotypes or environments, none has investigated differences among several early-maturing genotypes grown in multiple environments. Such study allows for the determination of the tocopherols concentration range found in soybean, but also to determine how genotypes perform and compare to each other in contrasting environments. Such information is vital for both plant breeders and agricultural producers.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


September 29, 2009, 8:03 AM CT

More effective mode of delivery for measles vaccine

More effective mode of delivery for measles vaccine
Worldwide, there are estimated to be 10 million cases of measles and 197,000 deaths from the disease each year. While vaccines exist to protect children against measles, the vaccines are often difficult to store, costly to transport and appears to be prone to contamination when shipped to developing countries. Research to be presented at the 2009 American Association of Pharmaceutical Researchers (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition will reveal new methods for delivering measles vaccines that could potentially reduce costs and improve safety.

"Vaccination has become controversial in some international communities which believe vaccines might be hazardous," said Robert Sievers, Ph.D., from the University of Colorado and one of the study's principal investigators. "However, in a number of parts of the world, the disease itself is a serious hazard, killing hundreds of thousands of children each year." .

While a liquid vaccine using a hypodermic needle is presently the only way to prevent the disease, Dr. Sievers' study shows promise for a new method that allows the patient to inhale a finely-powdered. In order to produce the inhalant, the weakened measles virus must be mixed with high-pressure carbon dioxide to produce microscopic bubbles and droplets, which are then gently dried to produce an inhalable powder. The powder is then puffed into a small inhaler-like device and administered. The aerosol vaccine was shown effective in test animals, and human trials are expected to begin next year in India, where more than half of the world's measles cases occur.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


September 29, 2009, 7:53 AM CT

Keep a pet, live healthier

Keep a pet, live healthier
Lowers blood pressure, encourages exercise, improves psychological health- these may sound like the effects of a miracle drug, but they are actually among the benefits of owning a four-legged, furry pet. This fall, the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine Research Center for Human-Animal Interaction (ReCHAI) will explore the a number of ways animals benefit people of all ages during the International Society for Anthrozoology and Human-Animal Interaction Conference in Kansas City, Mo., on Oct. 20-25.

"Research in this field is providing new evidence on the positive impact pets have in our lives," said Rebecca Johnson, associate professor in the MU Sinclair School of Nursing, the College of Veterinary Medicine and director of ReCHAI. "This conference will provide a unique opportunity to connect international experts working in human-animal interaction research with those already working in the health and veterinary medicine fields. A wonderful array of presentations will show how beneficial animals can be in the lives of children, families and elderly adults".

Earlier this year, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), co-hosted two workshops with The WALTHAM® Centre for Pet Nutrition, a division of Mars Incorporated, bringing together leading experts to discuss the benefits of human-animal interaction in childhood. With support from a grant from NICHD and sponsorship from WALTHAM®, the conference will continue this discussion.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


September 29, 2009, 7:41 AM CT

Those high heeled shoes may cause you heel and ankle pain

Those high heeled shoes may cause you heel and ankle pain
Women should think twice before buying their next pair of high-heels or pumps, as per scientists at the Institute for Aging Research of Hebrew SeniorLife in a newly released study of elderly adults and foot problems.

The scientists observed that the types of shoes women wear, specifically high-heels, pumps and sandals, may cause future hind-foot (heel and ankle) pain. Nearly 64 percent of women who reported hind-foot pain regularly wore these types of shoes at some point in their life.

"We found an increased risk of hind-foot pain among women who wore shoes, such as high-heels or pumps, that lack support and sound structure," says main author Alyssa B. Dufour, a graduate student in the Institute's Musculoskeletal Research Program.

Reported in the recent issue of the journal Arthritis Care & Research, the study is one of the first to examine the association between shoe wearbeyond just high-heel useand foot pain. The researchers, who analyzed foot-examination data from more than 3,300 men and women in The Framingham Study, say past shoe wear among women is a key factor for hind-foot pain. They found no significant link between foot pain and the types of shoes men wear.

While foot pain is a common complaint in the U.S. adult populationfoot and toe symptoms are among the top 20 reasons for doctor visits among those 65 to 74 years of agerelatively little is known about the causes of foot pain in elderly adults. Women are more likely than men to have foot pain; however, it is not known if this is due to a higher prevalence of foot deformities, underlying disease, shoe wear, or other lifestyle choices.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


September 24, 2009, 7:12 AM CT

Acetaminophen may prevent muscle loss

Acetaminophen may prevent muscle loss
Recent studies conducted by Dr. Eric Blough and colleagues at Marshall University have shown that use of the common pain reliever acetaminophen may help prevent age-associated muscle loss and other conditions.

Their study examined how acetaminophen may affect the regulation of protein kinase B (Akt), an enzyme known to play an important role in regulation of cellular survival, proliferation and metabolism.

The researchers' data indicates that aging skeletal muscles experience a decrease in the proper functioning of the enzyme and that acetaminophen intervention in aged animals could be used to restore Akt activity to a level comparable to that seen in young animals. In turn, this improvement in Akt activity was linked to improvements in muscle cell size and decreased muscle cell death.

"Using a model that closely mimics a number of of the age-associated physiological changes observed in humans, we were able to demonstrate that chronic acetaminophen therapy in a recommended dosage is not only safe but might be beneficial for the therapy of the muscle dysfunction a number of people experience as they get older," said Blough, an associate professor in the university's Department of Biological Sciences.

The lab's work, which was reported in the July 29 issue of the international research journal PLoS One, is the first study to show that acetaminophen ingestion, at least in animals, can be safely used for the therapy of age-related muscle loss. This finding could have far-reaching implications, given the fact that people age 65 and older make up the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


September 23, 2009, 7:08 AM CT

Occupational safety monitoring

Occupational safety monitoring
The new Standard Reference Material, Beryllium Oxide Powder (SRM 1877), shown in this scanning electron micrograph mimics the form of beryllium to which workers would be exposed much more closely and should facilitate much more representative and informative toxicological studies, more accurate monitoring and more effective clean up of contaminated areas.

Credit: R. Dickerson, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in collaboration with private industry and other government agencies, have produced a new reference material for beryllium. Beryllium, an exotic rare-earth metal used as a hardener in high-performance alloys and ceramics, can cause berylliosisa chronic, incurable and sometimes fatal illness. The new reference material is expected to dramatically improve methods used to monitor workers' exposure and aid in contamination control as well as toxicological research.

The use of beryllium in manufacturing dates back to the advent of the atomic age. One of the researchers involved with the famous Chicago experiment known as Chicago Pile-1 to create the first artificial self-sustaining nuclear reaction in 1942 died of berylliosis in 1988. Aside from the nuclear industry, the unique properties of beryllium make it valuable in the manufacture of aircraft and supercolliders.

Beryllium dust can cause a condition characterized by chronic skin and/or respiratory inflammation resembling pneumonia in susceptible individuals and can increase the risk of lung cancers with long periods of exposure. Treating the particles as a threat, the body's immune system floods the affected area with white blood cells. The cells surround the beryllium particles and harden to form inflamed tissue nodules called granulomas. These granulomas can lodge under the skin or in lung tissue where they cause difficulty breathing and a host of other symptoms including fatigue, weight loss and muscle pain. The condition, eventhough treatable, is incurable.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   156   157   158   159   160  

Did you know?
Adolescents who suffer physical injuries are vulnerable to emotional distress in the months following their hospitalization, yet almost 40 percent of hospitalized adolescents interviewed for a new study had no source for the follow-up medical care that could diagnose and treat symptoms of post-traumatic stress. These young trauma survivors are at risk for high levels of post-traumatic stress and depressive symptoms, as well as high levels of alcohol use, according to research by researchers at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of society medical news blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.