MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of skin news blog


Go Back to the main skin news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Skin News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


December 8, 2008, 10:21 PM CT

Men Are Red, Women Are Green

Men Are Red, Women Are Green
Male or female?
Test subjects tended to confirm subtle color differences associated with gender. Even when viewing pixelated or distorted images, subjects identified redder images as male and greener images as female. Top left: gender-ambiguous face; top-right: random noise over the ambiguous face; bottom-left: reconstructed male face; bottom-right: reconstructed female face.
Credit: Michael J. Tarr/Brown University
Michael J. Tarr, a Brown University scientist, and graduate student Adrian Nestor have discovered this color difference in an analysis of dozens of faces. They determined that men tend to have more reddish skin and greenish skin is more common for women.

The finding has important implications in cognitive science research, such as the study of face perception. But the information also has many potential industry or consumer applications in areas such as facial recognition technology, advertising, and studies of how and why women apply makeup.

"Color information is very robust and useful for telling a man from a woman," said Tarr, the Sidney A. and Dorothea Doctors Fox Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and professor of cognitive and linguistic sciences at Brown. "It's a demonstration that color can be useful in visual object recognition".

Tarr said the idea that color may help us to identify objects better has been controversial. But, he said, his and related findings show that color can nonetheless provide useful information.

Tarr and Nestor's research is published in the journal Psychological Science. The paper will be published online Dec. 8 and in print a few weeks later.

To conduct the study, Tarr needed plenty of faces. His lab analyzed about 200 images of Caucasian male and female faces (100 of each gender) compiled in a data bank at the Max Planck Institute in Tübingen, Gera number of, photographed using a 3-D scanner under the same lighting conditions and with no makeup. He then used a MatLab program to analyze the amount of red and green pigment in the faces.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


October 21, 2008, 9:14 PM CT

Chronic inflammation can help nurture skin cancer

Chronic inflammation can help nurture skin cancer
Inflammation, a frontline defense against infection or disease, can help nurture skin cancer, scientists have found.

IDO, an enzyme that works like a firefighter to keep inflammation under control, can be commandeered to protect early cancerous cells, say Medical College of Georgia scientists studying an animal model of chronic inflammation and skin cancer.

"Inflammation should really help prevent a tumor," says Dr. Andrew Mellor, director of the MCG Immunotherapy Center and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Molecular Immunogenetics. In fact, there is good evidence that inflammation triggers the immune response. "You want a good immune response; this is what protects you from pathogens," he says. "In this case, it's an unfortunate exploitation by cancerous cells".

In a study with Drs. George C. Prendergast and Alexander J. Muller at the Lankenau Institute of Medical Research in Philadelphia, scientists gave mice a single dose of a carcinogen at the same time they began painting a tiny portion of skin with a poison ivy derivative twice weekly for 20 weeks.

IDO quickly became part of the mix, creating a "suppressive" immune response that helped resulting premalignant cells grow into tumors, as per research published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. When they used the same protocol in a mouse in which IDO had been genetically deleted, tumor development dropped off dramatically.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


October 20, 2008, 5:43 AM CT

Educational materials can alter young women's attitudes about tanning

Educational materials can alter young women's attitudes about tanning
A new study indicates that educational literature can influence young women's use of indoor tanning, not by raising their fear of skin cancer but by changing their attitudes about indoor tanning and promoting healthier alternatives for changing appearance. The study is reported in the December 1, 2008 issue of CANCER, a peer-evaluated journal of the American Cancer Society.

Each year there are more than 1.3 million skin cancer diagnoses in the U.S., resulting in more than 10,000 deaths. A variety of efforts have attempted to get young people to alter their sun exposure behaviors, with limited success. For the new study, scientists led by Dr. Joel Hillhouse of the School of Public Health at East Tennessee State University designed a large, randomized, controlled study on an educational-based intervention meant to reduce indoor tanning, which is correlation to an increased risk of melanoma in young women.

The scientists included approximately 430 female university students aged 17 to 21 years, 200 of whom received a booklet on the effects of indoor tanning. The booklet, which focused on the appearance damaging effects of tanning, provided information on the history of tanning and tanning norms in society. It also presented the effects of ultraviolet radiation, specifically correlation to indoor tanning on the skin's appearance. The booklet also offered guidelines emphasizing tanning abstinence and recommended healthier alternatives to improve appearance including exercise, choosing fashion that does not require a complimentary tan and sunless tanning products.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 22, 2008, 7:55 PM CT

Does too much sun cause melanoma?

Does too much sun cause melanoma?
We are continuously bombarded with messages about the dangers of too much sun and the increased risk of melanoma (the less common and deadliest form of skin cancer), but are these dangers real, or is staying out of the sun causing us more harm than good?

Two experts debate the issue on BMJ.com today.

Sam Shuster, a consultant dermatologist at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, says that sun exposure is the major cause of the common forms of skin cancer, which are all virtually benign, but not the rarer, truly cancerous melanoma.

Shuster says that the common skin cancers develop in pale, sun exposed skin and are less frequent in people who avoid the sun and use protection. In contrast, melanoma is correlation to ethnicity rather than pigmentation and in 75% of cases occurs on relatively unexposed sites, particularly on the feet of Africans. Melanoma occurrence decreases with greater sun exposure and can be increased by sunscreens, while sun bed exposure has a small inconsistent effect. Therefore, he concludes, any causative effect of ultraviolet light on melanoma can only be minimal.

There is strong evidence that the reported increase in melanoma incidence is an artefact caused by the incorrect classification of non-malignant naevi as cancerous melanomas, this, he argues, explains why melanoma mortality has changed little despite the great increase in alleged incidence.........

Posted by: George      Read more         Source


June 17, 2008, 9:42 PM CT

Inherited melanoma risk: What you do know?

Inherited melanoma risk: What you do know?
Salt Lake CityWhen people know the results of genetic tests confirming they have inherited an increased risk of developing melanoma, they follow skin cancer screening recommendations more proactivelymuch like those who have already been diagnosed with the potentially deadly disease, as per results of a study completed at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute. and reported in the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention

Tests for mutations in the CDKN2A gene can reveal a reason that melanomas "run" in families. The study reviewed the intent to follow, and the actual practice of, skin cancer early detection methods by members of families that carry CDKN2A gene mutations. Study participants were drawn from a group of Utahns who participated in the original "CDKN2A gene hunt" 10 to 12 years ago. They already knew that their family history might put them at increased risk for melanoma, and they had previously received melanoma prevention and screening education.

The results showed that people who tested positive for the CDKN2A mutation followed melanoma screening recommendations more carefully than before, even if they had not had a melanoma. In addition, knowing the test results did not lead family members without the mutation to decrease their screening measures.........

Posted by: George      Read more         Source


June 1, 2008, 10:40 PM CT

New combination therapy safe, promising for melanoma

New combination therapy safe, promising for melanoma
The combination of two different biotherapies may be beneficial for patients with inoperable melanoma, as per a University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) study presented at the 44th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.

Scientists in the melanoma and skin cancer program at UPCI combined two biotherapies therapys that stimulate the immune system to fight cancer and found the results promising in terms of anti-tumor effects and tolerable in terms of toxicity. High-dose interferon alfa-2b, a standard therapy for metastatic skin cancer, and tremelimumab, an antibody thought to instigate the bodys immune system to attack tumors, were combined for the first time in this phase 2 clinical trial.

With each new study, we learn something important about melanoma, said John M. Kirkwood, M.D., leader of the program and professor and vice chairman for clinical research in the Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. With this study, we learned that adding tremelimumab to traditional therapy is not only safe, but an effective way to induce an anti-tumor response, which is very exciting.

For this study, 16 patients diagnosed with stage 4 melanoma, all of whom received and had not benefited from at least one round of prior treatment, were given the combination therapy. The overall response rate was 19 percent, and the study has since moved into the second stage, where it will enroll 21 additional patients.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


February 6, 2008, 9:03 PM CT

Two Different Peels Both Effective in Acne

Two Different Peels Both Effective in Acne
Image courtesy of dermstore.com
Chemical peels using either alpha-hydroxy acid or beta-hydroxy acid are both highly effective in treating mild to moderately severe facial acne, scientists at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have found - the first study to compare the two different types of acid peels as therapies for the skin disorder.

Peels using beta-hydroxy acid (or BHA) had slightly fewer side effects and results that lasted a bit longer than did peels using alpha-hydroxy acid (or AHA), the study found. But overall, both types of therapys were similarly effective in reducing lesions caused by acne vulgaris, the medical term for common facial acne, which affects some 85 percent of all people 12 to 24 years old.

"This is good news for the millions of Americans who suffer from mild to moderately severe facial acne," said Dee Anna Glaser, M.D., vice chair and professor of dermatology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine. "This provides more options for patients and doctors to chose from when it comes to tailoring a therapy program for each individual".

The research is reported in the current edition of Dermatologic Surgery.

AHA (which is also called glycolic acid) and BHA (also called salicylic acid) are frequently used by physicians to induce light skin peels, which help treat fine lines and wrinkles, acne and uneven texture and coloration. The peel removes a very thin layer of skin, which in turn promotes the growth of new, smoother skin.........

Posted by: George      Read more         Source


January 21, 2008, 8:09 PM CT

Melanomas may appear different than other moles

Melanomas may appear different than other moles
A preliminary study suggests that melanomas have a different appearance than other irregular skin moles (i.e., are ugly ducklings), as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Rates of cancerous melanoma continue to increase, and early identification allows surgeons to treat the disease by removing the tumor, as per background information in the article. The disease is more common in individuals with a number of moles or other skin marks, particularly if the marks are atypical in color, shape or size. The challenge for clinicians who diagnose and treat pigmented skin lesions is to distinguish between cancerous melanoma and non-malignant simulants, the authors write.

Alon Scope, M.D., of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, and his colleagues obtained images of the backs of 12 patients from a database of standardized patient images. All of the patients had at least eight atypical moles, and five patients had one lesion that had been confirmed as a melanoma. Thirty-four study participantsincluding eight pigmented lesion experts, 13 general dermatologists, five dermatology nurses and eight non-clinical medical staffwere asked to evaluate the images and identify lesions that looked different from all other atypical moles.........

Posted by: George      Read more         Source


January 8, 2008, 5:15 AM CT

Multiple skin cancer risk behaviors are common

Multiple skin cancer risk behaviors are common
Whether youre basking on the beach during vacation, coasting down glittering white snow on a weekend ski trip, or simply walking the dog or running errands, sunlights ultraviolet rays can damage your skin year-round. Yet a new study by behavioral scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center shows that most American adults engage in multiple behaviors that boost their risk of skin cancer by increasing their exposure to UV rays.

These behaviors include infrequent use of sun-protective clothing; staying outside in the sun rather than seeking shade; infrequent use of sunscreen with a sun-protection factor (SPF) of 15 or more; indoor tanning with a sunlamp or tanning bed within the past year; and getting sunburned within the past year.

Collectively, skin cancer of all types is the most common cancer in the United States and the incidence has increased over the past three decades. During 2007, an estimated 1.1 million Americans received a diagnosis of basal- or squamous-cell skin cancer or the more invasive, potentially lethal melanoma, as per the American Cancer Society.

Heredity plays an important role in skin cancer. For example, a typical portrait of someone at risk of skin cancer would show a natural blonde or redhead with very fair skin that freckles and burns more easily than it tans. Melanoma, in particular, is known to run in certain families.........

Posted by: George      Read more         Source


December 2, 2007, 8:47 PM CT

Broccoli against devastating genetic skin disorder

Broccoli against devastating genetic skin disorder
The compound sulforaphane whose natural precursors are found at high levels in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables has been hailed for its chemopreventive powers against cancer. Now sulforaphane has demonstrated new skills in treating a genetic skin blistering disorder called epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), Pierre Coulombe and his colleagues at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore report at the American Society for Cell Biology 47th Annual Meeting.

EBS is a rare but devastating inherited condition in which fluid-filled lesions called bullae appear at sites of frictional trauma to the skin. Unfortunately, therapy options for EBS are limited and palliative in nature. Much work remains to be done before sulforaphane can be tested clinically with EBS patients, but Coulombe notes that extracts from broccoli sprouts rich in sulforaphane have already been shown to be safe for use in human skin.

In EBS patients, the bottom layer of the epidermis, which is made of cells called keratinocytes, is uncommonly fragile and ruptures readily. Molecularly, most cases of EBS result from mutations in genes that produce the proteins keratin 5 (K5) and keratin 14 (K14). These proteins co-polymerize to form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in basal keratinocytes. Since the discovery in 1991 that EBS is a keratin-based disease, more than 40 additional disorders affecting a broad range of tissues have been traced to defects in genes that encode intermediate filament proteins.........

Posted by: George      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4  

Did you know?
Scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have found that the risk of developing melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, is only partially associated with exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, the rays in sunlight that increase in summer and cause sunburn.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of skin news blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.