MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of society medical news blog


Go Back to the main society medical news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Society Medical News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


August 4, 2009, 8:23 AM CT

Hip and back fractures increase mortality rates in older adults

Hip and back fractures increase mortality rates in older adults
If you are 50 or older and you break your hip, you have a one in four chance of dying within five years. Break your back, and you have a one in six chance of dying that soon, says a McMaster University study.

The research, to be published August 4 in the online edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), has observed that approximately 25 per cent of men and women who develop hip fractures and 16 per cent of people who develop spine factures will die over a five-year period.

The national study was led by George Ioannidis, a health research methodologist in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, in collaboration with researchers from the schools of medicine and nursing at McMaster, as well as several universities across Canada.

Using data from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study, the scientists examined the relationship between new fractures and mortality over a 5-year period in more than 7,750 Canadians aged 50 years and older. The study, looking at various types of fractures reported by participants, differed from prior research in that the study group was representative of the general population.

"Hip fractures may have long-lasting effects that result in eventual death by signalling or actually inducing a progressive decline in health," said Ioannidis. "Our results also showed that vertebral fracture was an independent predictor of death."........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


August 4, 2009, 8:06 AM CT

Brain difference in psychopaths identified

Brain difference in psychopaths identified
Professor Declan Murphy and his colleagues Dr Michael Craig and Dr Marco Catani from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London have found differences in the brain which may provide a biological explanation for psychopathy. The results of their study are outlined in the paper 'Altered connections on the road to psychopathy', published in Molecular Psychiatry

The research investigated the brain biology of psychopaths with convictions that included attempted murder, manslaughter, multiple rape with strangulation and false imprisonment. Using a powerful imaging technique (DT-MRI) the scientists have highlighted biological differences in the brain which may underpin these types of behaviour and provide a more comprehensive understanding of criminal psychopathy.

Dr Michael Craig said: 'If replicated by larger studies the significance of these findings cannot be underestimated. The suggestion of a clear structural deficit in the brains of psychopaths has profound implications for clinicians, research researchers and the criminal justice system.'.

While psychopathy is strongly linked to serious criminal behaviour (eg rape and murder) and repeat offending, the biological basis of psychopathy remains poorly understood. Also some researchers stress mainly social reasons to explain antisocial behaviours. To date, nobody has investigated the 'connectivity' between the specific brain regions implicated in psychopathy.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 2, 2009, 11:05 PM CT

Income and education associated with sugar consumption

Income and education associated with sugar consumption
The intake of added sugars in the United States is excessive, estimated by the US Department of Agriculture in 1999-2002 as 17% of calories a day. Consuming foods with added sugars displaces nutrient-dense foods in the diet. Reducing or limiting intake of added sugars is an important objective in providing overall dietary guidance. In a study of nearly 30,000 Americans reported in the August 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, scientists report that race/ethnicity, family income and educational status are independently linked to intake of added sugars. Groups with low income and education are especially vulnerable to eating diets with high added sugars.

There are differences within race/ethnicity groups that suggest that interventions aimed at reducing the intake of added sugars should be tailored to each group. Using data from adults (≥18 years) participating in the 2005 US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Cancer Control Supplement, researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), Bethesda, MD, and Information Management Services, Inc., Silver Spring, MD, analyzed responses to questions about added sugars. Both NCI and NHLBI are part of the National Institutes of Health.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 31, 2009, 0:16 AM CT

Got migraines?

Got migraines?
Migraine headaches are a drain not only on the estimated 30 million Americans who suffer from them, but on the economy, too. Because pain and other symptoms caused by migraine headaches can be quite severe, it is projected that nearly $13 billion is spent every year in headache therapy and loss of time from work, which no one can afford these days. But as per a newly released study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), there is hope for severe and frequent migraine sufferers who can't find relief in conventional remedies.

"Nearly one out of four households, including 18 percent of women, suffer from migraines and a number of patients are not only eager, but desperate to stop the pain," said ASPS Member Surgeon and study author Bahman Guyuron, MD, professor and chairman, department of plastic surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center. "In this study, we've shown that surgical therapy of migraine headaches is safe, effective, and that this reasonably short operation can have a colossal impact on the patients' quality of life all while eliminating signs of aging for some patients, too."

For nearly a decade, scientists have been testing the concept that migraines are caused when a person's trigeminal nerve branches are irritated. When the muscles around these branches are incapacitated, the headaches stop, which is why some patients have found relief from the 'freezing' effect of Botox therapys. However, as per this study, removal of these muscles or 'triggers,' offers an easily attainable and permanent fix.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


July 29, 2009, 11:13 PM CT

College students who feel 'invincible' unlikely to accept vaccines

College students who feel 'invincible' unlikely to accept vaccines
Vaccines to protect against sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV and herpes, are being developed and may soon be available to college students. However, limited research has been conducted to determine if students will accept the vaccines once they are available. In a newly released study, a University of Missouri researcher has observed that students who feel invulnerable, or invincible, to physical harm are unlikely to get an HIV vaccine. Alternately, students who feel invulnerable to psychological harm are more likely to get the vaccine.

"Prior scientists have used invulnerability measures to predict health-endangering behaviors in students, but this study is unique in that it considers the role of invulnerability in students' health-protective or preventative behaviors," said Russell Ravert, assistant professor in the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences.

In the study, Ravert measured two invulnerability factors: danger and psychological. Students with increased danger invulnerability, those who viewed themselves as physically invincible, were more likely to decline the vaccine. One explanation is that strong feelings of danger invulnerability appears to be linked to decreased threat, which can diminish protective behaviors, Ravert said.

Students who felt psychological invulnerability, those who didn't care what others thought, were more likely to accept a vaccine. Students' psychological invulnerability may protect against the possible stigma linked to getting vaccinated for HIV, or other sexually transmitted diseases, Ravert said.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


July 29, 2009, 11:08 PM CT

Reducing risk of hospitalization in the elderly

Reducing risk of hospitalization in the elderly
Elderly adults who have less strength, poor physical function and low muscle density are at higher risk of being hospitalized in comparison to adults with more strength and better function. That's the finding of a newly released study in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society

The study also observed that muscle density, a measure of how much fat in comparison to lean tissue there is in the muscle, is a more accurate gauge of a person's risk of hospitalization than muscle mass or size. The relative risk for hospitizations was 50% higher for those with poor walking or less dense muscle mass.

"Our research suggests that we need to re-think the way we define sarcopenia or age-related muscle loss," says Peggy Cawthon, PhD, MPH, a scientist with the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute and the main author of the study. "A number of definitions of sarcopenia today tend to focus on lean mass or muscle size, our study shows that is looking at the wrong factors. We observed that muscle strength or performance were much better ways of measuring function".

The scientists followed 3,011 healthy, non-disabled adults between the ages of 70 and 80, for an average of almost five years. They measured their physical function in many ways including walking speed, their ability to stand up from a chair repeatedly, the strength of their grip and their leg strength. By the end of the study more than 55 percent of the participants had experienced one or more hospitalizations. Those most likely to end up in the hospital were the adults who scored lowest on the measures of physical function; this held true after allowing age, medical conditions, lean mass or muscle size. They also observed that adults with the least dense thigh muscles, namely those with a higher proportion of fat in their thighs, were also at a higher risk of hospitalization in comparison to adults with more dense thighs.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 27, 2009, 11:17 PM CT

Cigarette packaging still misleading consumers

Cigarette packaging still misleading consumers
New research suggests that current regulations have failed to remove misleading information from cigarette packaging, revealing that a substantial majority of consumers believe cigarettes are less hazardous when the packs display words such as "silver" or "smooth," lower numbers incorporated into the brand name, lighter colours or pictures of filters.

In a study of 603 adults published recently (Tuesday) in the online edition of the Journal of Public Health, Canadian scientists call for the list of words banned from cigarette packaging to be expanded beyond the current prohibition of "light," "mild" and "low-tar" and suggest that other pack design elements may need to be eliminated to prevent consumers erroneously believing that one brand is less harmful than another.

"Research has already shown that using words such as 'light,' 'mild' and 'low tar' on cigarette packaging misleads consumers into thinking that one brand carries a lower health risk than another and that's why those words have been outlawed in more than 50 countries, but there has been virtually no independent research on these other packaging tactics to support broader regulation," said the study's leader, David Hammond, a professor of health studies at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. "Our study observed that commonly-used words not covered by the bans, as well as other packaging design elements such as colour, the use of numbers and references to filters, were just as misleading, which means there's a loophole that needs to be closed."........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 24, 2009, 0:04 AM CT

Testing trauma cases for blood alcohol levels

Testing trauma cases for blood alcohol levels
New findings show that testing for blood alcohol levels (BALs) can identify high-risk patients, even if they previously denied excessive drinking, and help to predict alcohol-related health complications.

Too much alcohol often causes trauma, complicates evaluation of injury, and interferes with inpatient care. Even though 20 to 37 percent of accident cases in trauma centers are alcohol-related, some trauma patients are reluctant to self report their drinking. A newly released study has observed that testing for alcohol biomarkers especially blood alcohol levels (BALs) can identify high-risk patients admitted to trauma centers who had denied excessive drinking.

Results would be reported in the recent issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research and are currently available at Early View.

"Alcohol use is linked to higher rates of motor vehicle accidents, falls, injuries inflicted by weapons, and workplace injuries than in persons not using alcohol," said Michael F. Fleming, professor of family medicine and corresponding author for the study. "In addition, patients processed through emergency may not be aware of their injury severity until the alcohol is out of their system, and in persons suffering from head trauma it is difficult to assess changes in mental status".........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 23, 2009, 11:53 PM CT

One in FourSpanish women take antidepressants

One in FourSpanish women take antidepressants
Psychopharmaceutical use has risen over recent years. This is fact, but what is not clear is the reason why. Scientists from four Madrid-based health centres have shown that family conflict is not a significant factor. However, the results reported in the journal Atencin Primaria are striking: in Spain, 24% of women take antidepressants and more than 30% take tranquillisers.

"The use of psychopharmaceuticals is often correlation to family or work-related problems. We wanted to see if there was actually a positive link between the consumption of antidepressants and benzodiazepines and any kind of family dysfunction", Sonsoles Prez, main author of the study reported in the renowned journal Atencin Primaria, and a doctor at the Las guilas Health Centre in Madrid, tells SINC.

The authors studied 121 women aged between 25 and 65, using family dysfunction surveys (the Apgar test), and the additive scale used to evaluate social readjustment (SLE). The psychopharmaceuticals analysed were antidepressants and benzodiazepines (anxiolytics such as lorazepam and bromazepam).

"Eventhough one might believe that family conflicts lead to greater consumption of psychopharmaceuticals among women, we did not find any such relationship", the researcher says, adding that the use of such drugs depends a lot on the population segment taking them. "Some people with family, work-related or financial problems do not feel able to tackle their problems and fall back on the use of drugs", Prez points out.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


July 21, 2009, 10:53 PM CT

Fighting disease atom by atom

Fighting disease atom by atom
Rice lab's atomic map of hepatitis E may reveal strategies to fight it.

Scientists at Rice University and their international colleagues have for the first time described the atomic structure of the protein shell that carries the genetic code of hepatitis E (HEV). Their findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could mean that new ways to stop the virus may come in the not-too-distant future.

Rice graduate student Tom Guu was part of the research team led by Yizhi Jane Tao, an assistant professor of biochemistry and cell biology. Guu said scientists have had a difficult time analyzing HEV, a especially nasty form of viral hepatitis that flourishes in the developing world, where poor sanitation is common.

"About 10 years ago, scientists began to describe what the virus looks like," said Guu. "They found protrusions and indentations on its surface. While it looked a bit like a buckyball, or a geodesic dome, scientists were still stuck".

Without a more detailed description of the virus, it has been hard to design drugs to stop it. To do that, you have to look at it very closely, as the Rice team has done.

Tao's lab specializes in X-ray crystallography, a powerful technique that can pinpoint the exact location of every atom in a biomacromolecule or a large biomacromolecular assembly. In this case, the assembly was the viral capsid shell, made from a network of individual capsid proteins from a strain of HEV that had been made in insect cells, then purified and crystallized.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   156  

Did you know?
Adolescents who suffer physical injuries are vulnerable to emotional distress in the months following their hospitalization, yet almost 40 percent of hospitalized adolescents interviewed for a new study had no source for the follow-up medical care that could diagnose and treat symptoms of post-traumatic stress. These young trauma survivors are at risk for high levels of post-traumatic stress and depressive symptoms, as well as high levels of alcohol use, according to research by researchers at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of society medical news blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.