MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog


Go Back to the main health news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Health News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


August 13, 2009, 6:53 AM CT

Cancer mortality rates experience steady decline

Cancer mortality rates experience steady decline
The number of cancer deaths has declined steadily in the last three decades. Eventhough younger people have experienced the steepest declines, all age groups have shown some improvement, as per a recent report in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Our efforts against cancer, including prevention, early detection and better therapy, have resulted in profound gains, but these gains are often unappreciated by the public due to the way the data are commonly reported," said Eric Kort, M.D., who completed the study while employed as a research scientist at the Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, Mich.

Scientists examined cancer mortality rates stratified by age and observed that for individuals born since 1925, every age group has experienced a decline in cancer mortality. The youngest age groups have experienced the steepest decline at 25.9 percent per decade, but even the oldest groups have experienced a 6.8 percent per decade decline.

The public often hears about incidence rates, which continue to rise across a number of cancer types, or mortality proportions, with the World Health Organization's assertion that death from cancer will surpass death from heart disease by 2010. Both these calculations are accurate, Kort said, but they ask the wrong question. In particular, the often-quoted WHO statistic can be misleading.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


August 13, 2009, 6:52 AM CT

MRI may cause more harm than good in newly diagnosed early breast cancer

MRI may cause more harm than good in newly diagnosed early breast cancer
A new review says using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before surgery to assess the extent of early breast cancer has not been shown to improve surgical planning, reduce follow-up surgery, or reduce the risk of local recurrences. The review, appearing early online in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, says evidence shows that MRI increases the chances of more extensive surgery over conservative approaches, with no evidence that it improves surgical care or prognosis.

Randomized controlled trials have shown women with early stage breast cancer who are treated with breast-conservation treatment (local excision and radiotherapy) have the same survival rates as those who undergo mastectomy. Recently, MRI has been introduced in preoperative staging of the affected breast in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer because it detects additional areas of cancer that do not show up on conventional imaging. In the current review, Nehmat Houssami, MBBS, Ph.D., of the University of.

Sydney, Australia, and Daniel F. Hayes, M.D., of University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Mich., evaluated available data on preoperative MRI's detection capability and its impact on therapy. The use of preoperative MRI scans in women with early stage breast cancer has been based on assumptions that MRI's detection capability in this setting will improve surgical therapy by improving surgical planning, potentially leading to a reduction in re-excision surgery, and by guiding surgeons to remove additional disease detected by MRI and potentially reducing recurrence in the treated breast. The authors say emerging data show that this approach to local staging of the breast leads to more women being treated with mastectomy without evidence of improvement in surgical outcomes or long-term prognosis.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


August 13, 2009, 6:50 AM CT

Sleep patterns in children and teenagers could indicate risk for depression

Sleep patterns in children and teenagers could indicate risk for depression
Sleep patterns can help predict which adolescents might be at greatest risk for developing depression, a researcher at UT Southwestern Medical Center has found in a five-year study.

Sleep is a biological factor known to be linked to adult depression. Depressed adults experience rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep earlier in the sleep cycle than people who are not depressed. Until this study, available online and in the July edition of Neuropsychopharmacology, it had been unclear whether this relationship held true in adolescents.

Dr. Uma Rao, professor of psychiatry at UT Southwestern and main author of the study, observed that adolescents with a familial risk for depression but without a depression diagnosis experienced shorter REM latency, meaning they reached the REM stage more quickly. Those adolescents were more likely to develop depression by the end of the five-year study period than those who reached REM sleep later in the cycle.

"Sleep is probably more helpful in determining who is at risk for developing depression than in being a diagnostic marker for depression since REM latency of those adolescents was shorter before they even developed the illness," Dr. Rao said.

Adolescent depression is complex to prevent and to treat in part because baseline levels of sleep and other factors used to diagnosis depression are not clearly defined. For example, in clinical studies, adolescents without manifestation of mental illness can be labeled erroneously as control group members because they haven't yet reached the highest-risk period for developing depression mid- to late-adolescence and early adulthood.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


August 11, 2009, 11:22 PM CT

Successfully reverse multiple sclerosis in mice

Successfully  reverse multiple sclerosis in mice
A new experimental therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) completely reverses the devastating autoimmune disorder in mice, and might work exactly the same way in humans, say scientists at the Jewish General Hospital Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research and McGill University in Montreal.

MS is an autoimmune disease in which the body's own immune response attacks the central nervous system, almost as if the body had become allergic to itself, leading to progressive physical and cognitive disability.

The new therapy, appropriately named GIFT15, puts MS into remission by suppressing the immune response. This means it might also be effective against other autoimmune disorders like Crohn's disease, lupus and arthritis, the scientists said, and could theoretically also control immune responses in organ transplant patients. Moreover, unlike earlier immune-supppressing therapies which rely on chemical pharamaceuticals, this approach is a personalized form of cellular treatment which utilizes the body's own cells to suppress immunity in a much more targeted way.

GIFT15 was discovered by a team led by Dr. Jacques Galipeau of the JGH Lady Davis Institute and McGill's Faculty of Medicine. The results were published August 9 in the prestigious journal Nature Medicine........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 11, 2009, 11:19 PM CT

Taking dex can improve high altitude exercise capacity

Taking dex can improve high altitude exercise capacity
Taking dexamathasone prophlyactically may improve exercise capacity in some mountaineers, as per Swiss researchers. Dexamathasone, known popularly to climbers as "dex," has been used for years to treat altitude-related symptoms in mountaineers, but has never been tested for its ability to improve exercise capacity at high altitude.

"We have known that both tadalafil and dexamethasone are good for preventing high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and dex for treating symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS). But we did not know whether they could also improve exercise capacity at altitude by reducing pulmonary hypertension, one of the important factors in altitude- related exercise limitations," said main authors Manuel Fischler, MD, of the University Hospital in Zurich, Switzerland, and Hans-Peter Brunner-La Rocca, of the University Hospital in Basel, Switzerland.

The results were reported in the August 15th issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the journal of the American Thoracic Society.

The scientists recruited 23 mountaineers with a history of HAPE and administered baseline cardiopulmonary exercise tests a low elevation (490 meters, or 1607 feet). Subjects were tested for oxygen uptake kinetics by pedaling a stationary bike at a constant rate for six minutes, and then for exercise capacity by pedaling at 50 percent of their predicted maximum workload for one minute, then increasing output by 25 percent each additional minute until exhaustion, commonly after 8 to 12 minutes.........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source


August 11, 2009, 11:17 PM CT

Toxic levels of Alzheimer's clusters in brain

Toxic levels of Alzheimer's clusters in brain
Researchers have long suspected that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by a small protein called the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). This protein clumps or binds to itself, eventually changing chemically to create brain protein deposits (plaques) that are characteristic of AD. However, recent studies have suggested that it is not the plaques that cause AD but rather these small, grape-like clusters of Aβ. These clusters vary in size, and the relationship between cluster size and their ability to kill nerve cells (toxicity) has never been determined accurately.

Until now. By creating various sizes of Aβ clusters in the lab that exactly match what forms in brains of those afflicted with AD, neurologists at UCLA have determined that toxicity increases dramatically as clusters increase in size from two to three to four Aβs. The scientists also report that eventhough the larger clusters are more toxic than smaller ones, the larger formations are relatively rare; smaller versions are numerous and thus are an inviting target for the development of new therapeutic drugs.

In addition, said David Teplow, senior author and a professor of neurology, developing the ability to make Aβ clusters in a very pure and precise way that duplicates what forms in AD brains will enable researchers to make detailed studies of their structures. This too will make development of future therapeutic drugs much easier and likely more successful. The research appears in the early on line edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 11, 2009, 11:16 PM CT

Mystery behind long-lasting memories

Mystery behind long-lasting memories
A newly released study by scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine may reveal how long-lasting memories form in the brain.

The scientists hope that the findings, now available online and scheduled to appear in an upcoming issue of Neuroscience, may one day help researchers develop therapys to prevent and treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

"Eventhough a number of things are known about memories that form from repeat experiences, not much is known with regard to how some memories form with just one exposure," said Ashok Hegde, Ph.D., an associate professor of neurobiology and anatomy and the lead investigator on the study.

Researchers do know that people tend to remember extremely happy or sad occasions vividly because of the emotional connection, Hegde said. Extreme emotions trigger the release of a chemical in the brain called norepinephrine, which is correlation to adrenaline. That norepinephrine somehow helps memories last a long time some even a lifetime.

For example, he said, when a person asks, "Where were you when the 9/11 attacks happened?" most people can recall immediately where they were and what they were doing when they heard the news. They remember the moment as if it just happened because a national tragedy arouses emotion and emotion somehow makes memories last for a long time, Hegde explained.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 11, 2009, 11:13 PM CT

Oxygen treatment hastens memory loss

Oxygen treatment hastens memory loss
A 65-year-old women goes into the hospital for routine hip surgery. Six months later, she develops memory loss and is later diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease. Just a coincidence? Scientists at the University of South Florida and Vanderbilt University don't think so. They suspect that the culprit precipitating Alzheimer's disease in the elderly women appears to be a routine administration of high concentrations of oxygen for several hours during, or following, surgery a hypothesis borne out in a recent animal model study.

Dr. Gary Arendash of the Florida Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at USF and Dr. L. Jackson Roberts II at Vanderbilt University used mice genetically altered to develop abnormal levels of the protein beta amyloid, which deposits in the brain as plaques and eventually leads to Alzheimer's-like memory loss as the mice age. They observed that young adult Alzheimer's mice exposed to 100-percent oxygen during several 3-hour sessions demonstrated substantial memory loss not otherwise present at their age. Young adult Alzheimer's mice exposed to normal air had no measurable memory loss, and neither did normal mice without any genetic predisposition for Alzheimer's disease.

The authors suggest that people genetically predisposed to Alzheimer's disease or with excessive amounts of beta amyloid in their brains are at increased risk of developing the disease earlier if they receive high concentrations of oxygen, known as hyperoxia. Their study is published online this month in NeuroReport........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 11, 2009, 11:10 PM CT

Powerful new therapy for asthma

Powerful new therapy for asthma
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston scientists have observed that a single enzyme is apparently critical to most allergen-provoked asthma attacks and that activity of the enzyme, known as aldose reductase, can be significantly reduced by compounds that have already undergone clinical trials as therapys for complications of diabetes.

The discovery, made in experiments conducted with mice and in human cell cultures, opens the way to human tests of a powerful new therapy for asthma, which today afflicts more than 20 million Americans. Such a development would provide a badly needed alternative to current asthma treatment, which primarily depends on hard-to-calibrate inhaled doses of corticosteroids and bronchodilators, which have many side effects.

"Oral administration of aldose reductase inhibitors works effectively in experimental animals," said UTMB professor Satish Srivastava, senior author of a paper on the discovery appearing in the Aug. 6 issue of the journal PLoS One "If these drugs work as well in humans as they do in animals you could administer them either orally or in a single puff from an inhaler and get long-lasting results."

Srivastava and colleagues (postdoctoral fellows Umesh Yadav and Leopoldo Aguilera-Aguirre, associate professor Kota Venkata Ramana, professor Istvan Boldogh and LSU Health Sciences Center assistant professor Hamid Boulares) focused on aldose reductase inhibition as a possible asthma treatment after establishing an essential role for the enzyme in other diseases also characterized by inflammation. In disorders such as colon cancer, atherosclerosis, sepsis and uveitis, the Srivastava team has found, cells are hit by a sudden overload of reactive oxygen species (varieties of oxygen and oxygen compounds that are particularly eager to react with other molecules). The result is a chain of biochemical reactions that leads the cells' genetic machinery to crank out a barrage of inflammatory signaling proteins. These summon immune system cells and generate even more reactive oxygen species, producing a vicious cycle of ever-increasing inflammation.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


August 11, 2009, 11:10 PM CT

No-Needle Approach to Prevent Blood Clots

No-Needle Approach to Prevent Blood Clots
The dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health and a team of researchers worldwide have found a better way to prevent deadly blood clots after joint replacement surgery - a major problem that results in thousands of unnecessary deaths each year. The research appears this week in the New England Journal (NEJM).

The research team, which includes researchers from Oklahoma, Denmark, Australia and Canada, set out to find a better way to prevent blood clots without increasing the risk of bleeding. Blood clots, known as deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), affect the large veins in the lower leg and thigh. If the clot breaks free and moves through the bloodstream, it can lodge in the lungs, a condition known as pulmonary embolism (PE), which is often fatal. Pulmonary embolism is the most common preventable cause of sudden death after surgery.

Current preventive therapys include uncomfortable injections and one oral anti-clotting medicine that is difficult for patients and physicians to manage. Scientists wanted to find something better.

In a double-blind study of more than 3,000 patients, scientists tested a new type of anti-clotting drug called Apixaban, which is an oral medication. The medicine proved just as effective at preventing blood clots and reduced the risk of bleeding by half. Most importantly for patient convenience, it was much easier to use.........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   156   157   158   159   160   161   162   163   164   165   166   167   168   169   170   171   172   173   174   175   176   177   178   179   180   181   182   183   184   185   186   187   188   189   190   191   192   193   194   195   196   197   198   199   200   201   202   203   204   205   206   207   208   209   210   211   212   213   214   215   216   217   218   219   220   221   222   223   224   225   226   227   228   229   230   231   232   233   234   235   236   237   238   239   240   241   242   243   244   245   246   247   248   249   250   251   252   253   254   255   256   257   258   259   260   261   262   263   264   265   266   267   268   269   270   271   272   273   274   275   276   277   278   279   280   281   282   283   284   285   286   287   288   289   290   291   292   293   294   295   296   297   298   299   300   301   302   303   304   305   306   307   308   309   310   311   312   313   314   315   316   317   318   319   320   321   322   323   324   325   326   327   328   329   330   331   332   333   334   335   336   337   338   339   340   341   342   343   344   345   346   347   348   349   350   351   352   353   354   355   356   357   358   359   360   361   362   363   364   365   366   367   368   369   370   371   372   373   374   375   376   377   378   379   380   381   382   383   384   385   386   387   388   389   390   391   392   393   394   395   396   397   398   399   400   401   402   403   404   405   406   407   408   409   410   411   412   413   414   415   416   417   418   419   420   421   422   423   424   425   426   427   428   429   430   431   432   433   434   435   436   437   438   439   440   441   442   443   444   445   446   447   448   449   450   451   452   453   454   455   456   457   458   459   460   461  

Did you know?
Studies in monkeys and women suggest that unlike traditional estrogen therapy, a diet high in the natural plant estrogens found in soy does not increase the risk of uterine cancer in postmenopausal women, according to Mark Cline, D.V.M., Ph.D., an associate professor of comparative medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.