MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of breast-cancer-blog


Go Back to the main breast-cancer-blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Breast-cancer-blog From Medicineworld.Org


December 4, 2008, 5:29 AM CT

Calcium and vitamin D may not be the only protection

Calcium and vitamin D may not be the only protection
Diets that are high in protein and cereal grains produce an excess of acid in the body which may increase calcium excretion and weaken bones, as per a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). The study observed that increasing the alkali content of the diet, with a pill or through a diet rich in fruits and vegetables has the opposite effect and strengthens skeletal health.

"Heredity, diet, and other lifestyle factors contribute to the problem of bone loss and fractures," said Bess Dawson-Hughes, M.D., of Tufts University in Boston, Mass. and lead author of the study. "When it comes to dietary concerns regarding bone health, calcium and vitamin D have received the most attention, but there is increasing evidence that the acid/base balance of the diet is also important."

Average elderly adults consume diets that, when metabolized, add acid to the body, said Dr. Dawson-Hughes. With aging, we become less able to excrete the acid. One way the body may counteract the acid from our diets is through bone resorption, a process by which bones are broken down to release minerals such as calcium, phosphates, and alkaline (basic) salts into the blood. Unfortunately, increased bone resorption leads to declines in bone mass and increases in fracture risk.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


December 4, 2008, 5:25 AM CT

Novel basis identified for tamoxifen failure

Novel basis identified for tamoxifen failure
Tamoxifen may worsen breast cancer in a small subset of patients. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Breast Cancer Research suggests that in patients who show reduced or absent expression of the protein E-cadherin, usually used anti-oestrogen drugs such as tamoxifen may promote more harmful cancer cell behaviour.

A team of scientists co-ordinated by Dr. Stephen Hiscox, from the Welsh School of Pharmacy at Cardiff University, investigated the selective oestrogen receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen on human breast cancer cells, comparing it to the direct effects of oestrogen withdrawal. Dr. Hiscox said, "Anti-oestrogens, such as tamoxifen, have been the mainstay of treatment in patients with oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer and have provided significant improvements in survival. Our experimental studies suggest that in a certain group of patients, it may be much less effective, however, as it appear to promote an aggressive cell behaviour".

The authors observed that tamoxifen can promote an invasive phenotype in ER+ breast cancer cells under conditions of poor cell-cell contact, a previously unknown effect of this drug. As per Dr. Hiscox, "This could have major clinical implications for those patients with tumours where there is inherently poor intercellular adhesion. In such patients, oestrogen deprivation with aromatase inhibitors (AIs) may be a more appropriate therapy".........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


December 3, 2008, 5:23 AM CT

New breast imaging technology targets hard-to-detect cancers

New breast imaging technology targets hard-to-detect cancers
Breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) is effective in the detection of cancers not found on mammograms or by clinical exam, as per a research studypresented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

"BSGI can identify the most difficult to detect breast cancerinvasive lobular carcinoma," said lead author Rachel F. Brem, M.D., professor of radiology and director of the Breast Imaging and Interventional Center at The George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It also can help us detect additional lesions of all types of breast cancer in women whose mammograms show only one suspicious lesion."

Breast cancer affects more women than any other non-skin cancer and, as per the American Cancer Society, accounts for more than 40,000 deaths annually in the U.S. Most experts agree that the best way to decrease breast cancer mortality is through early detection using mammography and clinical breast exam. However, some cancers are difficult to detect with mammography and clinical exam, especially in the earliest stage when therapy is most effective.

Typically while mammography findings are characterized by the difference in appearance between normal and suspicious breast tissue, BSGI findings are based on how malignant cells function.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


December 1, 2008, 6:22 PM CT

Eating eggs when pregnant affects breast cancer in offspring

Eating eggs when pregnant affects breast cancer in offspring
A stunning discovery based on epigenetics (the inheritance of propensities acquired in the womb) reveals that consuming choline-a nutrient found in eggs and other foods-during pregnancy may significantly affect breast cancer outcomes for a mother's offspring. This finding by a team of biologists at Boston University is the first to link choline consumption during pregnancy to breast cancer. It also is the first to identify possible choline-related genetic changes that affect breast cancer survival rates.

"We've known for a long time that some agents taken by pregnant women, such as diethylstibesterol, have adverse consequences for their daughters," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "But there's an upside. The emerging science of epigenetics has yielded a breakthrough. For the first time, we've learned that we might be able to prevent breast cancer as early as a mother's pregnancy".

The scientists made the discovery in rats by studying females whose mothers were fed varying amounts of choline during pregnancy. Different groups of pregnant rats received diets containing standard amounts of choline, no choline at all, or extra choline. Then the scientists treated the female offspring with a chemical that causes cancer of the mammary gland (breast cancer). Eventhough animals in all groups developed mammary cancer, the daughters of mothers that had received extra choline during pregnancy had slow growing tumors while daughters of mothers that had no choline during pregnancy had fast growing tumors.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 24, 2008, 9:42 PM CT

Mammograms may detect some cancers that would have otherwise regressed

Mammograms may detect some cancers that would have otherwise regressed
Breast cancer rates increased significantly in four Norwegian counties after women there began undergoing mammography every two years, as per a report in the November 24 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Rates among regularly screened women remained higher than rates among women of the same age who were screened only once after six years, suggesting that some of the cancers detected by mammography may have spontaneously regressed had they not been discovered and treated.

Throughout Europe, the start of screening mammography programs has been linked to increased occurence rate of breast cancer, as per background information in the article. "If all of these newly detected cancers were destined to progress and become clinically evident as women age, a fall in incidence among older women should soon follow," the authors write. "The fact that this decrease is not evident raises the question: What is the natural history of these additional screen-detected cancers?".

Per-Henrik Zahl, M.D., Ph.D., of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, and his colleagues examined breast cancer rates among 119,472 women age 50 to 64 who were all invited to participate in three rounds of screening mammograms between 1996 and 2001 as part of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. They compared these to rates among a control group of 109,784 women age 50 to 64 in 1992, who would have been invited for screening if the program had existed at that time. Cancers were tracked for six years using a national registry, and at the end of that time all participants were invited to undergo a one-time screening to assess breast cancer prevalence.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 19, 2008, 6:15 PM CT

Causes of bone loss in breast cancer survivors

Causes of bone loss in breast cancer survivors
Osteoporosis is a growing concern among breast cancer survivors and their doctors, because certain cancer drugs can cause bone loss.

But a new study has observed that cancer drugs aren't the only culprits. Among 64 patients with breast cancer referred to a bone health clinic, 78 percent had at least one other cause of bone loss, including vitamin D deficiency, excessive calcium excretion in urine and an overactive parathyroid gland.

"Doctors evaluating patients with breast cancer for possible bone loss should look further than cancer drugs," said Dr. Pauline Camacho, lead author of the study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology Camacho is an associate professor in the department of medicine, division of endocrinology and metabolism, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

A co-author of the study, Dr. Kathy Albain, said breast cancer survivors "are just like the normal population as they age in that bone loss can be due to a number of treatable causes." Albain is a professor in the Department of Medicine, division of hematology/oncology at Stritch.

Prior studies have observed that chemotherapy drugs can cause bone loss. Studies also have observed that a class of breast cancer drugs called aromatase inhibitors can decrease bone mineral density and increase the risk of fractures in postmenopausal women. Aromatase inhibitors decrease the body's production of estrogen. While estrogen feeds cancer, it also protects against osteoporosis. Aromatase inhibitors include letrozole (trade name, Femara), anastrazole (Arimidex) and exemestane (Aromasin).........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 17, 2008, 10:16 PM CT

Psychological interventions associated with breast cancer survival

Psychological interventions associated with breast cancer survival
A new study finds that patients with breast cancer who participate in intervention sessions focusing on improving mood, coping effectively, and altering health behaviors live longer than patients who do not receive such psychological support. Reported in the December 15, 2008 issue of CANCER, a peer-evaluated journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that reducing the stress that can accompany cancer diagnosis and therapy can have a significant impact on patients' survival.

Cancer patients undergo a significant amount of stress before, during, and after therapy. A number of scientists have theorized that providing mental health services in addition to cancer care may improve patients' health and even prolong their survival. But studies linking psychotherapy to improved survival have had inconsistent results. To test the hypothesis, Dr. Barbara L. Andersen and his colleagues at The Ohio State University conducted a randomized clinical trial with newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer that tested whether receiving a psychological intervention could reduce the negative effects of stress and ultimately change the course of a patient's disease. Prior papers have shown that the intervention significantly improved psychological, behavioral, and health outcomes and enhanced immunity.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 13, 2008, 10:40 PM CT

Antibody Poses A Double Threat to Breast Cancer

Antibody Poses A Double Threat to Breast Cancer
ErbB2 (blue) combines with ErbB3 (yellow) on the surface of the cancer cell. When a signaling molecule (red) attaches to ErbB3, ErbB2 sends a pro-cancer message within the cell. The ALM antibody forces ErbB2 and ErbB3 apart.
Credit: Fox Chase Cancer Center For a high resolution version
A small, antibody-like molecule created by scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center can successfully attack two separate molecules on the surface of cancer cells at the same time, halting the growth of breast cancer cells in laboratory tests, the scientists say. The molecule, nickname "ALM," might be a means of slowing cancer spread or, as the scientists believe, a guidance system for delivering more aggressive drugs directly to cancer cells. Their findings are published in this month's British Journal of Cancer.

Unlike naturally occurring antibodies, which only bind to one specific target at a time, ALM is bispecific, meaning it attaches to two separate targets simultaneously. ALM's targets are two signaling proteins, ErbB2 and ErbB3, which connect to form a growth-promoting complex on the surface of a number of cancer cells, including head and neck cancer and drug-resistant breast cancer.

"ALM grabs the ErbB2-ErbB3 complex strongly with both hands, as it were, providing a solid grip on the tumor and blocking the transmission of a growth signal within the cell," said lead investigator Matthew Robinson, PhD, an associate member of Fox Chase and a researcher in the Fox Chase Head and Neck Cancer Keystone Program. "Potentially, it can become a platform for delivering therapeutics directly to cancer cells or a way of detecting the presence and location of individual tumors."........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 6, 2008, 6:13 PM CT

Quality Of Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

Quality Of Life After Breast Cancer Treatment
Opting for less damaging therapys, staying active and learning about the warning signs of lymphedema: that's how women with breast cancer can avoid developing chronic lymphedema, as per the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG). Women can learn more about how to protect themselves from this common and distressing adverse effect of therapy as well as handle the condition at the Institute's website, www.informedhealthonline.org.

Protecting women's lymph systems

Breast cancer therapy is becoming more effective, with a survival rate of more than 80% for this disease in Gera number of. As the survival rate goes up, quality of life for survivors assumes even more importance, as per the German Institute. Lymphedema is an adverse effect of breast cancer therapy caused by damage to the lymph system. When the lymph system cannot properly remove fluids from around the breast and arm, the fluid gathers and the arm swells. This causes pain and restricts movement. It could become a chronic problem that is hard to treat.

The more aggressive breast cancer therapy is, the higher the risk of lymphedema. Scientists estimate around 400,000 women in Gera number of alone have lymphoedema caused by breast cancer therapy.

"Even with a number of women having less aggressive breast cancer therapys, around 10 to 20% will develop lymphedema," as per Professor Peter Sawicki, the Institute's Director. "We doctors still underestimate the impact on patients' quality of life of therapy adverse effects like lymphedema. The first step to prevention is using therapies that limit the damage to the woman's lymph system".........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


October 31, 2008, 5:38 AM CT

Study of breast cancer in black women

Study of breast cancer in black women
A new study seeking to improve scientists' understanding of breast cancer, including why the disease's fatality rate is higher in African-American women, is getting underway in 44 counties in North Carolina.

The project, named after the late Jeanne Hopkins Lucas, a North Carolina state senator who died of breast cancer last year, is being run by the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The research is an extension of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, one of the largest breast cancer databases in the United States.

Potential participants will be identified from among women living in the 44 North Carolina counties, as participating hospitals report newly diagnosed breast cancer cases to the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry. Using a scientifically selected study sample, UNC scientists will contact the doctor of record previous to contacting the patient about the study.

Robert Millikan, D.V.M., Ph.D., Barbara Sorensen Hulka Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, is the study's principal investigator. Mary Beth Bell, project manager of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, is coordinating the project team, which includes nurse interviewers, recruitment specialists, outreach coordinators and others. The study is supported by the University Cancer Research Fund.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25  

Breast cancer
Every year, more than 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States. Breast cancer ranks second as the leading cause of cancer deaths in American women. Until recently breast cancer topped the list of leading causes of cancer deaths in women, but lately lung cancer has claimed the top position. If skin cancer is excluded, breast cancer is the commonest cancer among American women.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of breast-cancer-blog

BREAST CANCER MAIN| Home| Breast cancer news| Common terms| Breast cancer treatment| Breast cancer treatment by stage| Mammogram and breast cancer screening| Surgical treatment of breast cancer| Chemotherapy of breast cancer| Chemo drugs used in breast cancer| Doxorubicin| Cyclophosphamide| Methotrexate| Hormonal therapy of breast cancer| Radiation therapy of breast cancer| Monoclonal therapy| High dose chemotherapy for breast cancer| Recurrent breast cancer| Bisphosphonates and breast cancer| Pregnancy and breast cancer| Risk factors for breast cancer| Risk details| My risk| Comprehensive breast cancer information| Breast cancer statistics| African Americans and breast cancer| Ashkenazi and breast cancer| Asians| Hispanic| Men| Native Americans| Older women and breast cancer| Younger women| Pregnant women and breast cancer| BRCA|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.