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December 21, 2006, 3:52 PM CT

Did You Eat Broccoli During Your Pregnancy?

Did You Eat Broccoli During Your Pregnancy?
Did you eat nutritious food during your last pregnancy? I never knew protection from cancer would start in uterus. That's exactly what the scientists are saying. They say that women should eat lots of food when they are bearing a child. Pregnant and nursing women should eat a good quantity of cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cabbage. Guess what? It would protect your infant from cancer both during infancy and during later life.

The study results come from study of animals. Scientists from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, studied laboratory mice, and observed that supplements of a key phytochemical found in certain vegetables provided a very high level of protection against leukemia and lymphoma in young animals, and also significantly protected against lung cancer during the rodent's equivalent of middle age.

Read more on the story

The research, reported in the journal Carcinogenesis, is one of the first of its type to demonstrate that diet may play a protective role in a fight against cancer that may begin - and could be won or lost - well before a person is ever born. And some of the protective benefits may last into adulthood.

"Research of this type is still in its infancy, but it's pretty exciting," said David Williams, an LPI researcher and director of the Marine and Freshwater Biomedical Sciences Center at OSU.........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink         Source


December 18, 2006, 7:52 PM CT

Breast Cancer Metastases Early detection

Breast Cancer Metastases Early detection
GeneSearch- Breast Lymph Node (BLN) Assay, a gene-based diagnostic test has greater sensitivity than traditional intra-operative methods of detecting the spread of breast cancer to the lymph nodes. In the recent study that was presented at 29th Annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium GeneSearch- Breast Lymph Node (BLN) Assay was shown to do give superior results. GeneSearch- BLN Assay demonstrated overall sensitivity at least 10 percentage points higher than traditional intra-operative tests.

"These results indicate the potential advantage of the GeneSearch- BLN Assay as an objective, standardized test that can assess breast cancer metastasis in the lymph nodes rapidly and with greater overall sensitivity than the current standard of care," said study investigator Peter W. Blumencranz, MD, FACS, Medical Director of Comprehensive Breast Health and Cancer Services, Morton Plant Mease Healthcare, and Medical Director of Moffitt Morton Plant Cancer Care, Clearwater, Florida. "This intra-operative test may provide surgeons with critical information that can help them optimize treatment decisions by allowing them to determine the scope of the surgery required".

In the study that was presented involves 416 patients across 11 clinical trial sites, sentinel lymph nodes were tested using the GeneSearch- BLN Assay and current methods for assessing nodal tissue during surgery (frozen section (FS) or touch preparations (TP)). All nodes were sampled for permanent section hematoxylin/eosin (H&E), and most were also sampled for immunohistochemistry (IHC). The GeneSearch- BLN Assay, FS and TP results were each compared to permanent section histology results to determine the performance of each method. The test was evaluated in terms of sensitivity and specificity, which measure how well the method correctly identifies nodes with and without clinically relevant metastases. Tests with lower sensitivity have a higher chance of false negatives, and tests with lower specificity have a higher chance of false positives.........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink         Source


December 18, 2006, 7:38 PM CT

Characteristics Of Fast-growing Skin Cancers

Characteristics Of Fast-growing Skin Cancers
Melanomas (skin cancers) are more likely to grow rapidly if they are thicker, symmetrical, elevated, have regular borders or have symptoms, as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. In addition, rapidly progressing melanoma is more likely to occur in elderly men and individuals with fewer moles and freckles, and its cells tend to divide more quickly and have fewer pigments than those of slower-growing cancers.

"Anecdotal experience suggests that there is a form of rapidly growing melanoma, but little is known about its frequency, rate of growth, or associations," the authors write as background information in the article. One prior study suggested that how quickly a melanoma grew predicted how likely the patient was to relapse at one year or to survive without relapsing. Other research indicates that different types of melanoma grow at different rates; for instance, an aggressive type known as nodular melanoma grows more quickly than any other kind.

Wendy Liu, M.B.Ch.B., Ph.D., Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, Australia, and his colleagues investigated melanoma growth rate in 404 consecutive patients (222 male, 182 female, average age 54.2) with invasive melanoma. Participants' skin was examined by a dermatologist and information about such characteristics as the number of typical and atypical moles was recorded. In addition, the patients were interviewed as soon as possible after diagnosis and preferably with a friend or family present. The scientists gathered information about demographics, skin cancer risk factors, the characteristics of the tumor and who first detected the cancer-the patient, a family member or friend, or a physician.........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink         Source


December 18, 2006, 7:33 PM CT

Estrogen Use May Lower Colon Cancer Risk

Estrogen Use May Lower Colon Cancer Risk
A new study from the Dana-Farber cancer institute shows that postmenopausal women with colon cancer lives longer if they have been taking estrogen supplements within five years of their diagnosis. This becomes an interesting finding given the fact that postmenopausal estrogen usage has been on decline recently because of reports of increased risk of breast cancer linked to its use.

In this new study, which is reported in the latest issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, researchers examined the effect of estrogen use on the survival of older women already diagnosed with the disease.

The scientists are not suggesting that women should be taking postmenopausal hormone therapy to prevent colon cancer risk. With estrogen use has dropped sharply among postmenopausal women in recent years, due to concerns about its role in heart disease and breast cancer, numerous studies have shown it significantly lowers the chances of developing colorectal cancer considering the other health risks linked to its use. Scientists are hoping that this finding would lead to development of new drugs from the clues obtained.

"This study provides a rationale to further study the basic mechanism by which estrogen influences the development and progression of colon cancer," states lead author Jennifer Chan, MD, MPH, of Dana-Farber. "By understanding how estrogen offers potentially beneficial effects in some types of cells yet deleterious effects in others, it may be possible to design therapies that are effective against colon cancer without posing a significant risk of other problems".........

Posted by: Sue      Permalink         Source


December 17, 2006, 9:50 PM CT

Advances In Breast Imaging

Advances In Breast Imaging
A diagnostic device that resembles a mammography unit can detect breast tumors as tiny as one-fifth of an inch in diameter, which may make it a valuable complementary imaging technique to mammography, say researchers at Mayo Clinic, who helped develop the technology along with industry collaborators Gamma Medica and GE Healthcare.

This new technique, Molecular Breast Imaging, uses a new dual-head gamma camera system and is sensitive enough to detect tumors less than 10 millimeters (about two-fifths of an inch) in diameter in 88 percent of cases where it is used. Early findings from an ongoing comparison of the device with mammography show that it can detect small cancers that were not found with mammography, say the investigators. Mayo Clinic physicist Michael O'Connor, Ph.D., will present these results Saturday, Dec. 16, at the 2006 meeting of the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

"Our ultimate goal is to detect small cancers that may be inconspicuous or invisible on a mammogram for high-risk women with dense breasts," says Dr. O'Connor.

The scientists also say their device will likely be only slightly more expensive to use than mammography, and will be much more comfortable for women because much less pressure is needed to image a breast.

"We hope that our studies will eventually show our device to be almost as sensitive as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is probably the best diagnostic test available to date, but is not widely used because of its expense," says Stephen Phillips, M.D., a Mayo radiologist and a study co-author. An MRI scan costs as much as ten times more than a traditional mammogram and involves injection of a contrast agent.........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink         Source


December 17, 2006, 9:42 PM CT

Breast Cancer Patients May Not Follow Hormonal Therapy

Breast Cancer Patients May Not Follow Hormonal Therapy
Postmenopausal women with early-stage, hormone-sensitive breast cancer have a lower risk of disease recurrence when their therapy includes a new class of hormone treatment drugs, yet one out five women prescribed the drugs may not take them regularly, as per a research studyconducted by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals. Their findings will be presented at the 29th annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on Saturday, Dec. 16 (Abstract 4044).

"These data are very concerning because hormonal treatment for breast cancer is one of the most effective therapys in all of oncology," said Ann Partridge, MD, MPH, the study's lead author and a breast cancer specialist at Dana-Farber. "Women may be compromising their care, and ultimately their survival, if they do not take these medications as recommended."

Partridge and her colleagues analyzed claims data from three large commercial health plan systems to gauge therapy compliance of more than 7,000 women with early stage-breast cancer who, in addition to their regular therapy, began taking anastrozole.

Anastrozole is part of a new class of drugs, called aromatase inhibitors, that reduces the production of the hormone estrogen by blocking aromatase, an enzyme that converts the hormone androgen into estrogen. Studies have shown that lowering estrogen levels in post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer can reduce their risk of disease recurrence.........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink         Source


December 16, 2006, 12:04 AM CT

Reduced Fat Intake Decreases Breast Cancer Recurrence

Reduced Fat Intake Decreases Breast Cancer Recurrence
Reducing dietary fat intake may decrease the chance of a breast cancer recurrence in women who have been treated for early-stage breast cancer, as per a randomized, phase III trial in the December 20 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The relationship between dietary fat intake and breast cancer is unclear, both for primary breast cancer development and breast cancer recurrence. Rowan T. Chlebowski, M.D., Ph.D., of the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at the Harbor-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center in Torrance, Calif., and colleagues set out to determine whether a low-fat diet could prolong relapse-free survival in women with early-stage breast cancer.

Between February 1994 and January 2001, 2,437 women who had been treated for early-stage breast cancer were recruited from the Women's Intervention Nutrition Study (WINS). They were randomly assigned to a dietary intervention group (40%), or a control group (60%). The new study reports an analysis of all information collected as of October 31, 2003 with an average of 5 years of follow-up, when funding for the intervention ceased.

The goal of the dietary intervention was to reduce dietary fat to 15% of total calories. Women in the intervention group attended eight biweekly, 1-hour counseling sessions to learn about a low-fat eating plan, and they kept written records of their daily fat gram intake. Dieticians contacted or met with the women every 3 months, and participants could attend optional monthly dietary group sessions. Women in the control group met with a dietician when they started the trial and were contacted by dieticians every 3 months.........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink         Source


December 15, 2006, 4:30 AM CT

How NSAIDs Halt Cancer Growth

How NSAIDs Halt Cancer Growth
Researchers have discovered that induction of a gene known as MDA-7/IL-24 is the molecular mechanism that enables nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to halt the growth of cancer cells, a finding that could eventually lead to the development of targeted cancer therapys.

Led by scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), in collaboration with researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, the new findings provide the answer to the long-puzzling question: How does this popular class of pain killers protect people from developing this deadly disease" The study appears in the Dec. 15 issue of the journal Cancer Research.

"Eventhough findings based on observation had previously demonstrated that NSAIDs [such as aspirin, ibuprofen and sulindac] might be effective in the prevention and therapy of several common cancers, it wasn't at all clear how this was happening," explains the study's senior author Towia Libermann, PhD, Director of the BIDMC Genomics Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS). "Now, after treating many different types of cancer cells in culture with a whole set of NSAIDs, we can point to this single gene which, when upregulated, kills cancer cells while sparing normal, healthy cells".........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink         Source


December 15, 2006, 4:22 AM CT

How To Predict Potential For Breast Cancer Spread

How To Predict Potential For Breast Cancer Spread
Expression of two different proteins taken from primary tumor biopsies is highly linked to spread of breast cancer to nearby lymph nodes, as per scientists who say this protein profile could help identify at an early stage those patients whose disease is likely to metastasize.

In the December 15 issue of Cancer Research, the scientists say over-expression of one unidentified protein and under-expression of another is 88 percent accurate in identifying breast cancer that has spread in a group of 65 patients, in comparison to an analysis of lymph nodes and outcomes.

If the predictive and diagnostic power of these proteins is validated, they could be analyzed in primary tumor biopsies that are routinely collected at the time of diagnosis, saving some women from extensive and possibly unnecessary therapy as well as from undergoing a second surgery to collect lymph nodes for analysis, the scientists say.

"We want to be able to predict, at the earliest stages, if a tumor has spread and how dangerous it will be," said the study's lead author, Dave S. B. Hoon, Ph.D., director of Molecular Oncology at the John Wayne Cancer Institute, Saint Johns Health Center, in Santa Monica, California. "These two proteins may allow us to target aggressive tumors with more extensive treatment management to some women, while sparing others from needless therapy".........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink         Source


December 13, 2006, 7:55 PM CT

New Hope To Lung Cancer Patients

New Hope To Lung Cancer Patients
Patients suffering from the most common type of lung cancer experienced a 20-percent improvement in overall survival in a national clinical trial of a drug that chokes off the blood vessels nourishing tumors, a multicenter study has observed.

Dr. Joan Schiller, chief of hematology/oncology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, said: "This is great news for patients with lung cancer - they live longer, and the side effects from Avastin are unlike those of conventional chemotherapy. For example, Avastin does not cause hair loss, nausea, or vomiting".

Results of the Phase III trial involving 878 patients that was conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group are published in the Dec. 14 issue of the New England Journal (NEJM). The publication of the study comes two months after the Food and Drug Administration approved the drug bevacizumab, known under the trademark Avastin, as a first-line therapy for patients with inoperable, locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic non-squamous, non-small cell lung cancer. The FDA approval was based on the findings of the study.

The results of the trial showed that patients who received Avastin along with the conventional chemotherapy drugs paclitaxel and carboplatin had a 35-percent chance of responding to the therapy, in comparison to 15 percent for patients who received chemotherapy alone.........

Posted by: Scott      Permalink         Source



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Cancer
Cancer is a very common disease, approximately one out of every two American men and one out of every three American women will have some type of cancer at some point during the course of their life. Cancer is more common in the elderly and 77 percent of cancers occur in people above age 55 or older. Cancer is also common in children. Cancer incidence is said to have two peaks once during early childhood and then during late years in life. No age period is completely exempted from development of cancers. Some cancers occur predominantly in the elderly, other types occur in children, Cancer occurs in all ethnic races, however the cancer rates and rates of specific cancer types may vary from group to group. Late stages of cancer may be incurable in most cases, but with the advancement of medicine, more and more cancers are becoming curable.

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