MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of cancer-blog


Go Back to the main cancer-blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Cancer-blog From Medicineworld.Org


December 9, 2007, 5:01 PM CT

Vaccine improves outcome leukemia patients

Vaccine improves outcome leukemia patients
Patients whose immune system responded to a peptide vaccine for leukemia enjoyed a median remission that was more than three times longer than non-responders, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reports at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

Immune response to the PR1 vaccine was linked to an 8.7 month event-free survival compared with 2.4 months for non-responders. Clinical responses ranging from improvements in blood counts to complete cytogenetic remission were observed in 36 percent of the responders compared with 10 percent of non-responders.

"We did not expect dramatic responses in this clinical trial, and were pleasantly surprised to see the clinical responses and improved event-free survival" says Muzaffar Qazilbash, M.D., associate professor in M. D. Anderson's Department of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

The Phase I/II clinical trial that ran from 2000 to 2006 was designed to assess the vaccine's safety and its ability to elicit an immune response. Toxicity was limited to low-grade injection site side effects such as redness, swelling and some pain.

The PR1 vaccine is derived from two myeloid leukemia-associated antigens, proteins that are either overexpressed or aberrantly expressed in cancer cells. When PR1 elicits an immune response, PR1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes are produced that selectively kill three types of leukemia - myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myelogenous leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


December 9, 2007, 4:58 PM CT

More good news from Gleevec

More good news from Gleevec
Gleevec, the targeted cancer pill that has saved more than 100,000 lives, now is saving more children with a dire leukemia, as well as preventing disease progression with long term use in adults with chronic myeloid leukemia.

Data at this weekends meeting continues to show how much Gleevec has completely changed the outlook for so a number of, a number of patients facing cancer, said Brian Druker, M.D., director of the OHSU Cancer Institute.

At the plenary session of the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology scientists delivered news that Gleevec has been shown to improve outcomes for children with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL).

Ph+ ALL is the childhood leukemia with the worst prognosis and the Childrens Oncology Group study shows that adding Gleevec to the therapy almost completely reverses this poor prognosis. The Childrens Oncology Group is a worldwide clinical trial cooperative supported by the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes of Health.

Also released at the conference is new data from the largest clinical trial in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) that showed Gleevec, with long-term use, can prevent progression to advanced stages of the disease.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


December 2, 2007, 8:19 PM CT

Cancer cells 'feel' much softer than normal cells

Cancer cells 'feel' much softer than normal cells
A multidisciplinary team of UCLA researchers were able to differentiate metastatic cancer cells from normal cells in patient samples using leading-edge nanotechnology that measures the softness of the cells.

The study, published Dec. 2, 2007 in the advance online edition of the journal Nature Nanotechnology, represents one of the first times scientists have been able to take living cells from cancer patients and apply nanotechnology to analyze them and determine which were malignant and which were not. The nano science measurements may provide a potential new method for detecting cancer, particularly in cells from body cavity fluids where diagnosis using current methods is typically very challenging. The method also may aid in personalizing therapys for patients.

When cancer is becoming metastatic, or invading other organs, the diseased cells must travel throughout the body. Because the cells need to enter the bloodstream and maneuver through tight anatomical spaces, cancer cells are much more flexible, or softer, than normal cells. These spreading, invading cancer cells can cause a build-up of fluids in body cavities such as the chest and abdomen. But fluid build-up in patients does not always mean cancer cells are present. If the fluid could be quickly and accurately tested for the presence of cancer, oncologists could make better decisions about how aggressive a therapy should be administered or if any therapy is necessary at all.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 29, 2007, 10:56 PM CT

Researchers link enzyme to breast cancer malignancy

Researchers link enzyme to breast cancer malignancy
This release is available in French.

McGill University scientists have uncovered the crucial role played by the enzyme focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in the onset of breast cancer. The research, led by Dr. William Muller along with colleagues from McGill and the Beatson Institute for Cancer Research in Scotland was published the week of November 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The study's first author is Dr. Hicham Lahlou, a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Muller's lab.

Using transgenic mice with pre-existing cancers, the McGill team was able to disable the function of FAK in the mammary gland. "When we did that, we basically blocked tumour progression in our mouse model," said Dr. Muller, Professor of Biochemistry at McGill, Canada Research Chair in Molecular Oncology and a researcher with the Molecular Oncology Group at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC). "This shows that FAK, which was already associated with tumour growth in skin carcinomas, is very critical for tumour progression from a pre-cancerous to a cancerous state in the mammary tumour system."

Dr. Muller and his team made a similar breakthrough with an earlier discovery in 2004, when they showed that the protein beta1-integrin was similarly critical in the initiation of tumour growth and development of breast cancer in genetically engineered mice. Likewise, when this gene was blocked, malignant tumours ceased to grow. The current discovery about FAK is an exciting sequel to the earlier research, says Dr. Muller, because, unlike beta1-integrin, kinase enzymes are eminently "druggable" with current technology.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 29, 2007, 10:51 PM CT

Biomarkers for epithelial ovarian cancer

Biomarkers for epithelial ovarian cancer
With the genomic revolution radical improvement has been made in methods of detection of ovary cancer. This is of the utmost importance, since the chances of successful therapy are strongly enhanced with early detection. In a special issue of Disease Markers, published by IOS Press, eleven articles explore new developments in the identification and understanding of biomarkers for epithelial ovary cancer.

A number of of these biomarkers may serve not only as markers of clinical and biology interest but also as potential therapeutic and imaging targets which could significantly improve the survival of patients with this disease, states Prof. Michael J. Birrer (National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research, Cell and Cancer Biology Department, MD, USA).

Discussed in the issue are new hypotheses on the molecular development of ovary cancer, SP markers of risk, biomarkers that are specific for the different histological subtypes, and new biomarkers and approaches for the early detection of ovary cancer. Furthermore, new molecular technologies have allowed for the analysis and characterization of specific cellular components of ovarian tumors identifying biomarkers of tumor associated immune and endothelial cells.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


November 29, 2007, 10:40 PM CT

Post-treatment PET scans for cervical cancer patients

Post-treatment PET scans for cervical cancer patients
Whole-body PET (positron emission tomography) scans done three months after completion of cervical cancer treatment can ensure that patients are disease-free or warn that further interventions are needed, as per a research studyat Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

"This is the first time we can say that we have a reliable test to follow cervical cancer patients after treatment," says Julie K. Schwarz, M.D., Ph.D., a Barnes-Jewish Hospital resident in the Department of Radiation Oncology. "We ask them to come back for a follow-up visit about three months after therapy is finished, and we perform a PET scan. If the scan shows a complete response to therapy, we can say with confidence that they are going to do extremely well. That's really powerful."

Schwarz and his colleagues published their study in the Nov. 21, 2007 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

Without a test like PET, it can be difficult to tell whether therapy has eliminated cervical tumors, Schwarz says. That's because small tumors are hard to detect with pelvic exams, and overt symptoms, such as leg swelling, don't occur until tumors grow quite large. Furthermore, CT and MRI scans often don't differentiate tumor tissue from surrounding tissues, Pap tests can be inaccurate because of tissue changes induced by radiation treatment, and no blood test exists to detect the presence of cervical cancer.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


November 29, 2007, 10:19 PM CT

Quit Rates Double With Counseling And Free Nicotine Patches

Quit Rates Double With Counseling And Free Nicotine Patches
Increasing the level of Quitline smoking cessation services and offering free nicotine patches are a successful and cost-effective way to reduce smoking rates, as per two new studies in the recent issue of Tobacco Control, a peer-evaluated publication of the British Medical Journal. Both studies were conducted by scientists at Kaiser Permanentes Center for Health Research in Portland, the Oregon Health Department, and Free & Clear in Seattle, a phone-based tobacco therapy program.

One study observed that the number of callers to the Oregon Tobacco Quitline jumped from 6,426 to 13,646 annually, and their quit rates nearly doubled, when Oregon became the first state in the country to promote Quitline services by combining one 30-minute telephone counseling session with a free two-week supply of Nicotine Replacement Therapy using earned or unpaid media to increase calls from smokers.

Previous to this initiative, the Oregon Tobacco Quitline provided one 30-minute telephone counseling session with no NRT and promoted the service through paid advertising. Analysis of the one-year results showed that the free NRT initiative was extremely successful even though its total costs were higher than the costs of the pre-initiative program ($2.25 million versus $1.97 million) because:.........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source


November 27, 2007, 10:12 PM CT

Drinking And Smoking Don't Boost HPV-Related Cancer Risk

Drinking And Smoking Don't Boost HPV-Related Cancer Risk
Heavy smoking and drinking are known to cause head and neck cancer. Infection with human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV16), a common strain of the sexually-transmitted HPV virus, is another known risk factor for head and neck cancer, which affects about 500,000 people each year worldwide.

New Brown University research, however, shows that alcohol and tobacco use doesn't further increase the risk of contracting head and neck cancers for people infected with HPV16. This finding, reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, is the strongest evidence to date that these major cancers have two distinct causes - and may represent two distinct classes of cancer - and would require different prevention and therapy strategies.

Karl Kelsey, M.D., a Brown professor of community health and pathology and laboratory medicine and the director of the Center for Environmental Health and Technology, said the research has public health policy implications.

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that girls and young women receive the HPV vaccine to prevent cervical cancer - HPV16 causes about half of all cervical cancer cases - boys and men cannot get the vaccine. An estimated 20 million Americans are currently infected with genital HPV and 50 to 75 percent of sexually active men and women are infected with HPV at some point in their lives, as per the National Institutes of Health.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 27, 2007, 8:48 PM CT

PET scanning for lung cancer staging

PET scanning for lung cancer staging
PET scanner
Positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful diagnostic tool that supports the need for more accurate staging of lung cancer and improved therapy for patients, concludes an extensive systematic review published online today in Journal of National Cancer Institute.

The review conducted by the Lung Cancer Disease Site Group of Cancer Care Ontarios Program in Evidence-Based Care led by a Sunnybrook researcher, Dr. Yee Ung, evaluates the accuracy and utility of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (18FDG-PET) in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death and early diagnosis provides the best chance for long term survival, says Dr. Ung, chair, Lung Cancer Site Group, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook. It is our hope this systematic review contributes to clinical guideline discussions exploring the potential of PET as part of standard preoperative work-up - along with computed tomography (CT) - to further enhance assessment of early-stage lung cancer.

While the standard imaging technologies CT provide structural information and defines disease states based on anatomical changes, PET provides complementary information on biochemical processes that may precede gross anatomical changes.

Key findings drawn from the literature review include PET imaging is accurate in differentiating between non-malignant and cancerous lung tumours as small as 1 centimetre. PET was also shown to be more effective for mediastinal (lymph nodes in the centre of the chest) staging in non-small cell lung cancer. Nonetheless, confirmation of PET findings by surgical biopsy remains important. With best available data, the scientists also identified good accuracy in staging extensive versus limited stage small cell lung cancer.........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source


November 19, 2007, 8:30 PM CT

New HPV vaccine under study

New HPV vaccine under study
A new vaccine against nine of the most harmful strains of human papillomavirus is under study at the Medical College of Georgia.

The vaccine, called nine-valent, is being compared with Gardasil, a quadrivalent vaccine already on the market that works against the two most deadly HPV types.

"We're testing Gardasil against three different doses of the investigational vaccine," says Dr. Daron Ferris, family medicine doctor and director of the MCG Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Center. "This study will determine the best dose of the new vaccine and whether it is safe, well-tolerated and effective in preventing HPV infection and disease compared with what's already out there".

Gardasil, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2006, protects against HPV types 16 and 18, which cause about 70 percent of HPV-related cervical cancer cases, and types 6 and 11, which cause about 90 percent of genital wart cases.

The new drug could prevent infection from those four types and five other cancer-causing types, Dr. Ferris says.

"Women infected with those five types of HPV also have an increased risk of developing severe premalignant cervical disease and cervical cancer," he says. "While genital warts go away on their own in most cases, cervical premalignant lesions are less likely to disappear without therapy".........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72  

Cancer
Cancer is a very common disease, approximately one out of every two American men and one out of every three American women will have some type of cancer at some point during the course of their life. Cancer is more common in the elderly and 77 percent of cancers occur in people above age 55 or older. Cancer is also common in children. Cancer incidence is said to have two peaks once during early childhood and then during late years in life. No age period is completely exempted from development of cancers. Some cancers occur predominantly in the elderly, other types occur in children, Cancer occurs in all ethnic races, however the cancer rates and rates of specific cancer types may vary from group to group. Late stages of cancer may be incurable in most cases, but with the advancement of medicine, more and more cancers are becoming curable.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of cancer-blog

Main Page| Cancer blog| Cancer blogs list| Lung cancer blog| Colon cancer blog| Prostate cancer blog| Breast cancer blog| Diabetes watch blog| Heart watch blog| Allergy blog| Bladder cancer blog| Cervical cancer blog| Colon cancer news blog| Diabetes news blog| Esophageal cancer blog| Gastric cancer blog| Health news blog| Heart news blog| Infectious disease blog| Kidney watch blog| Lung disease blog| Lung cancer news blog| Mesothelioma blog| Neurology blog| Breast cancer news blog| OBGYN blog| Ophthalmology blog| Ovarian cancer blog| Cancer news blog| Pancreas cancer blog| Pediatrics blog| Prostate cancer news blog| Psychology blog| Research blog| Rheumatology blog| Society news blog| Uterine cancer blog| Weight watch blog|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.