MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of cancer-blog


Go Back to the main cancer-blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Cancer-blog From Medicineworld.Org


February 6, 2008, 9:22 PM CT

PET Outperforms CT In Malignant Lung Nodules

PET Outperforms CT In Malignant Lung Nodules
Image courtesy of Medical College of Georgia
Scientists involved in a large, multi-institutional study comparing the accuracy of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) in the characterization of lung nodules observed that PET was far more reliable in detecting whether or not a nodule was cancerous.

"CT and PET have been widely used to characterize solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) as non-malignant or cancerous," said James W. Fletcher, professor of radiology at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Ind. "Almost all prior studies examining the accuracy of CT for characterizing lung nodules, however, were performed more than 15 years ago with outdated technology and methods, and prior PET studies were limited by small sample sizes," he noted.

"Detecting and characterizing SPNs is important because cancerous nodules represent a potentially curable form of lung cancer. Identifying which SPNs are most likely to be cancerous enables physicians to initiate the proper treatment before local or distant metastases develop," said Fletcher.

In a head-to-head study addressing the limitations of prior studies, PET and CT images on 344 patients were independently interpreted by a panel of experts in each imaging modality, and their determination of non-malignant and cancerous nodules were in comparison to pathologic findings or changes in SPN size over the next two years.........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source


January 30, 2008, 9:21 PM CT

Links between prostate cancer, cadmium, and zinc

Links between prostate cancer, cadmium, and zinc
Cadmium exposure is a known risk factor for prostate cancer, and a new University of Rochester study suggests that zinc may offer protection against cadmium.

In an article reported in the February 2008 journal, The Prostate, epidemiologist Edwin van Wijngaarden, Ph.D., reports that PSA levels were 22 percent higher among American men who had zinc levels below the median (less than 12.67 mg/daily) and cadmium levels above the median. (PSA is a protein produced by the cells of the prostate gland. The higher a mans PSA level, the more likely cancer is present.) .

In contrast, among men with a greater than median zinc intake, little evidence of an association between cadmium and PSA was found.

The way zinc and cadmium interact within human organs is significant and provides interesting leads for study, van Wijngaarden said. Zinc stimulates production of a protein that binds cadmium thereby taking it out of circulation and reducing its toxic effects.

However, it is too early to recommend zinc supplements for those whore worried about prostate damage, he added.

Your health is based on the complex interplay of a number of factors, said Van Wijngaarden, an assistant professor in the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Environmental exposures play out differently in people. Its important to identify those subpopulations that may be more sensitive to toxicities.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


January 29, 2008, 9:24 PM CT

Digital mammography superior to film mammography

Digital mammography superior to film mammography
For some women, digital mammography may be a better screening option than film mammography, as per newly published results from a national study led by a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researcher.

The results, from the Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), appear in the recent issue of Radiology. UNCs Dr. Etta D. Pisano is principal investigator and lead author of the study, which observed that digital mammography performed better than film mammography for pre- and perimenopausal women under age 50 with dense breasts.

We looked at a cross-section of characteristics, Pisano said. This paper confirms that if you are under 50, pre- or perimenopausal, and have dense breasts, you should definitely be screened with digital rather than film.

Pisano is Kenan professor of radiology and biomedical engineering and vice dean for academic affairs and in the UNC School of Medicine. She is also director of the Biomedical Research Imaging Center and a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

DMIST enrolled 49,528 women at 33 centers in the U.S. and Canada. The women underwent both digital and film mammography. Breast cancer status was determined for 42,760 women.

The original DMIST results showed that digital was statistically similar to film in the overall screening population but performed better than film in pre- and perimenopausal women under 50, Pisano said.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


January 28, 2008, 10:31 PM CT

The smaller the tumor, the better your chances

The smaller the tumor, the better your chances
The odds of surviving cancer of the pancreas increase dramatically for patients whose tumors are smallest, as per a new study by scientists at Saint Louis University and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston the first study to specifically evaluate the link between tumor size and survival rates for one of the most common and deadly cancers.

The findings in the current edition of Pancreas (www.pancreasjournal.com) vividly underscore the importance of early diagnosis of pancreas cancer, the scientists said.

Even though it seems intuitive and was supported by preliminary observations from earlier studies, for the first time we now have evidence that a progressive decrease in the size of a pancreatic tumor at the time of diagnosis improves patient outcomes rather dramatically, said Banke Agarwal, M.D., Associate Professor of gastroenterology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine and lead author of the study.

These data emphasize the benefit and the need of finding and diagnosing tumors in the pancreas as early as possible, Agarwal added. In order to make progress against pancreas cancer, we have to redouble our efforts to identify symptoms that are linked to the early stages of the disease.

Pancreas cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the United States and one of the most deadly, responsible for more than 33,000 deaths a year, as per the National Institutes of Health.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


January 21, 2008, 8:15 PM CT

Infections rates of breast surgery

Infections rates of  breast surgery
Infections at the incision site occurred in more than 5 percent of patients following breast surgery and cost them more than $4,000 each in hospital-related expenses, as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Reported surgical site infection rates following mastectomy (surgical removal of the breast) and other breast procedures range from 1 percent to 28 percent, as per background information in the article. Given the state of fiscal constraints within the U.S. health care system, it is important to calculate the cost-effectiveness of infection control interventions to justify their use from an economic perspective, the authors write. Cost-effectiveness analyses require accurate estimates for the attributable costs of hospital-acquired infections, which are lacking for surgical site infections.

Margaret A. Olsen, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and his colleagues studied 949 hospital admissions for mastectomy or breast reconstruction procedures at a university-affiliated hospital between 1999 and 2002. Surgical site infections were identified in an electronic hospital database and verified by review of medical records. Costs were taken from the hospital accounting database and included those from the original admission to the hospital for surgery as well as any readmissions within one year of surgery.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


January 21, 2008, 7:59 PM CT

Pros, cons of drug to prevent prostate cancer

Pros, cons of drug to prevent prostate cancer
Dr. Yair Lotan's analytical research calls for men to weigh the potential benefits and as well as the side effects of the drug finasteride before taking it to prevent prostate cancer.

Credit: UT Southwestern Medical Center
Findings by UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists encourage men to weigh both the potential benefits and side effects of the drug finasteride before taking it to prevent prostate cancer.

In todays online issue of Cancer, UT Southwestern doctors analyzed data gathered by the National Cancer Institutes Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, or PCPT. The trial, which began in October 1993, was designed to test whether finasteride could prevent prostate cancer in men 55 years of age and older. It was stopped early in June 2003 when an analysis showed that finasteride reduced the risk of developing prostate cancer by 25 percent.

UT Southwesterns analysis of the PCPT data indicates that cost effectiveness and quality of life issues linked to taking the drug are not clear cut, said Dr. Yair Lotan, assistant professor of urology and the Cancer studys senior author. The PCPT data show that in addition to preventing prostate cancer, finasteride also reduces urinary-tract symptoms linked to non-malignant prostatic hyperplasia. It also decreased sexual desire and caused impotence in 5 percent of the trial participants. Some PCPT participants who did develop prostate cancer also had high-grade tumors, eventhough there is ongoing debate whether this result might have been due to sampling bias.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


January 10, 2008, 10:35 PM CT

Pancreatic cancer cells evade immune system

Pancreatic cancer cells evade immune system
A protein that helps prevent a womans body from rejecting a fetus may also play an important role in enabling pancreas cancer cells to evade detection by the immune system, allowing them to spread in the body.

Scientists at Jeffersons Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia observed that the metastatic cancer cells in the lymph nodes of patients with pancreas cancer produce enough of the protein, IDO, to essentially wall-off the immune systems T-cells and recruit cells that suppress the immune systems response to the tumor. The findings might mean not only a better way to detect pancreas cancer spreading to lymph nodes, but also could enhance tumor immune treatment strategies against the fast-moving, deadly disease.

As per Jonathan Brody, Ph.D., assistant professor of Surgery at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, one way that metastatic cancer cells can survive in nearby lymph nodes is by avoiding the immune system. Evidence from studies by researchers looking at other cancers has indicated that IDO (indolamine 23 dioxygenase) is critical to regulating the immune environment. The Jefferson researchers wanted to know if metastatic pancreas cancer cells residing in the lymph nodes expressed IDO to avoid being found, and if so, could they target this enzyme with available drugs to prevent the cancer cells from hiding from the immune system.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


January 8, 2008, 5:18 AM CT

4 health behaviors can add 14 extra years of life

4 health behaviors can add 14 extra years of life
People who adopt four healthy behaviours not smoking; taking exercise; moderate alcohol intake; and eating five servings of fruit and vegetables a day live on average an additional fourteen years of life compared with people who adopt none of these behaviours, as per a research studyreported in the open access journal PLoS Medicine.

Rather than focusing on how an individual factor is correlation to health, the study calculates the combined impact of these four simply-defined forms of behaviour. The results suggest that several small lifestyle changes could have a marked impact on the health of populations.

There is overwhelming evidence showing that lifestyles such as smoking, diet and physical activity influence health and longevity but there is little information about their combined impact. Furthermore the huge amount of information provided by these studies and the varying definitions of a health behaviour that these studies use can often make them confusing for public health professionals and for the general public. For example: small amounts of alcohol appear to be correlation to lower risk of cardiovascular disease health but what is the overall impact on longevity ".

In order to examine the combined impact of lifestyle changes, Kay-Tee Khaw and his colleagues from the University of Cambridge and the Medical Research Council used a health behaviour score that is easy to understand in order to assess the participants in the study (who were from Norfolk, United Kingdom). Between 1993 and 1997, 20,000 men and women between the ages of 45 and 79, none of whom had known cancer or heart or circulatory disease, completed a questionnaire that resulted in a score between 0 and 4. A point was awarded for each of the following: not currently smoking; not being physically inactive (physical inactivity was defined as having a sedentary job and not doing any recreational exercise); a moderate alcohol intake of 1-14 units a week (a unit is half a pint of beer or a glass of wine); and a blood vitamin C level consistent with eating five servings of fruit or vegetables a day. Deaths among the participants were recorded unti l 2006.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


January 6, 2008, 10:30 PM CT

Potent Cancer-Fighting Marine Product

Potent Cancer-Fighting Marine Product
Salinispora tropica
An unexpected discovery in marine biomedical laboratories at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has led to new, key information about the fundamental biological processes inside a marine organism that creates a natural product currently being tested to treat cancer in humans. The finding could lead to new applications of the natural product in treating human diseases.

A research team led by Bradley Moore, a professor with UCSD's Scripps Oceanography Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and postdoctoral researcher Alessandra Eustáquio, along with their colleagues at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, discovered an enzyme called SalL inside Salinispora tropica, a promising marine bacterium identified in 1991 by Scripps researchers.

As they describe in the most recent issue of Nature Chemical Biology, the scientists also identified a novel process-a "pathway"-for the way the marine bacterium incorporates a chlorine atom, the key ingredient for triggering its potent cancer-fighting natural product. Previously known methods for activating chlorine were processed through oxygen-based approaches. The new method, conversely, employs a substitution strategy that uses non-oxidized chlorine as it is found in nature, as with common table salt.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


January 3, 2008, 9:29 PM CT

Gene dose affects tumor growth

Gene dose affects tumor growth
Scientists at Johns Hopkins and Ohio State University have observed that the number of copies of a particular gene can affect the severity of colon cancer in a mouse model. Publishing in the Jan. 3 issue of Nature, the research team describes how trisomy 21, or Down syndrome in humans, can repress tumor growth.

We took a new approach to a 50-year-old debate about whether people with Down syndrome develop cancer less often than other people, says Roger H. Reeves, Ph.D., professor of physiology in the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine at Hopkins. Studying the genetic differences linked to Down syndrome has revealed a new way of thinking about repressing cancer growth in everyone.

The research team started with a mouse model that carries, rather than a whole extra copy of chromosome 21 as is seen in trisomy 21, or Down syndrome, a partial copy containing 108 genes. They then mated those trisomic mice to mice that carry a mutation that causes intestinal tumors, similar to those seen in colon cancer in humans. The trisomic, colon cancer mice had 44 percent fewer intestinal tumors in comparison to the colon cancer mice without the extra 108 genes.

The team then used another mouse model of Down syndrome, one that carries extra copies of only 33 of the genes on chromosome 21, and repeated their genetic crosses. Mice with three copies of the 33 genes developed half the number of tumors as mice with the standard two copies. Mice carrying a deletion that left them with only one copy of these 33 genes developed twice the number of tumors as usual.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74  

Cancer
Cancer is a very common disease, approximately one out of every two American men and one out of every three American women will have some type of cancer at some point during the course of their life. Cancer is more common in the elderly and 77 percent of cancers occur in people above age 55 or older. Cancer is also common in children. Cancer incidence is said to have two peaks once during early childhood and then during late years in life. No age period is completely exempted from development of cancers. Some cancers occur predominantly in the elderly, other types occur in children, Cancer occurs in all ethnic races, however the cancer rates and rates of specific cancer types may vary from group to group. Late stages of cancer may be incurable in most cases, but with the advancement of medicine, more and more cancers are becoming curable.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of cancer-blog

Main Page| Cancer blog| Cancer blogs list| Lung cancer blog| Colon cancer blog| Prostate cancer blog| Breast cancer blog| Diabetes watch blog| Heart watch blog| Allergy blog| Bladder cancer blog| Cervical cancer blog| Colon cancer news blog| Diabetes news blog| Esophageal cancer blog| Gastric cancer blog| Health news blog| Heart news blog| Infectious disease blog| Kidney watch blog| Lung disease blog| Lung cancer news blog| Mesothelioma blog| Neurology blog| Breast cancer news blog| OBGYN blog| Ophthalmology blog| Ovarian cancer blog| Cancer news blog| Pancreas cancer blog| Pediatrics blog| Prostate cancer news blog| Psychology blog| Research blog| Rheumatology blog| Society news blog| Uterine cancer blog| Weight watch blog|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.