MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog


Go Back to the main health news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Health News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


November 25, 2008, 9:41 PM CT

Radiation Before Surgery Improves Pancreatic Cancer Outcomes

Radiation Before Surgery Improves Pancreatic Cancer Outcomes
Pancreas cancer is one of the deadliest and most difficult to treat cancers. Now, in a major step forward, scientists at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center have shown that administering radiation treatment previous to surgery nearly doubles survival in pancreas cancer patients with operable tumors.

"Patients who received pre-surgical (neoadjuvant) radiation had almost double the overall survival compared with similar patients who didn't undergo radiation, and survived significantly longer than patients who received radiation after the tumor was removed," says the study's senior author, Dr. David Sherr, assistant professor of clinical radiation oncology at Weill Cornell Medical College, and a radiation oncologist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

The findings appear in the Nov. 15 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics.

Pancreas cancer remains the fifth deadliest malignancy in the United States, killing more than 32,000 Americans each year. It is typically not detected until it is already at an advanced stage when cure is rarely possible. In fact, the five-year survival rate for pancreas cancer has been stalled at just 5 percent for the past 25 years.

Because pancreatic tumors have often spread or have directly invaded critical structures by the time they are detected, just 15 to 20 percent of patients are deemed suitable candidates for surgical removal (resection) of the tumor. And while post-operative radiotherapy has long been used to sterilize residual cancer cells that may not have been removed by surgery, the notion of using radiation before resection has been a controversial one.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


November 25, 2008, 9:37 PM CT

Disclosure of medication can save a patient's life

Disclosure of medication can save a patient's life
Do you regularly take aspirin or antiplatelet medications? Do you know whether or not these drugs should be stopped before dental procedures or surgeries? As per a research studyreported in the May/recent issue of General Dentistry, the clinical, peer-evaluated journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), stopping antiplatelet medications previous to a surgical procedure places a patient at greater risk of permanent disability or death.

The probability of a patient bleeding depends on the over-the-counter and/or prescribed drug or combinations of drugs.

"A thorough drug history should be evaluated previous to any procedures," notes Mary Aubertin, DMD, lead author of the study. Dr. Aubertin recommends that the dentist and patient start with a simple discussion. "The dentist and the patient should discuss the risks and benefi ts of therapy with or without the drugs versus no therapy and include the patient's physician's opinion in the decision making process. This will allow everyone involved to understand and prevent medical risks".

Fortunately, due to the prevalence of this type of medication, dentists are prepared to treat these situations. As per AGD spokesperson Carolyn Taggart-Burns, DDS, "excessive bleeding is a major concern with a number of dental procedures due to the extensive prescribing of blood thinners in America. Heart disease is so prevalent that a number of patients are on these drugs, which can complicate even the simplest procedure." Dr. Taggart-Burns reminds patients that it is very important "to communicate medical history with your dentist so that they can provide the best care possible".........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 24, 2008, 9:53 PM CT

Why women should eat less and move more

Why women should eat less and move more
Weight and appetite experts from around the world met at a conference in Bangkok earlier this year to discuss sex differences in obesity. One line of discussion looked at factors leading to women's weight gain during menopause, and how it might be avoided.

Co-chairs of the conference, Dr Amanda Sainsbury-Salis from Sydney's Garvan Institute of Medical Research and Dr Jennifer Lovejoy from the University of Washington, Seattle have summarised the conference consensus for the recent issue of Obesity Reviews The paper is now available online.

"One of the most interesting things that came out of the conference with applicability to large numbers of women was the discussion about why women gain weight during menopause," said Dr Sainsbury-Salis.

"So a number of women get confused when they start to gain weight during menopause, because their eating habits haven't changed".

"What the research shows clearly is that menopause causes a dramatic and sudden reduction in physical activity levels. Just previous to menopause, women halve their amount of activity in comparison to pre-menopause levels".

"So one reason women gain weight in menopause is because of a reduction in energy expenditure. Combine this with unchanged eating habits and weight gain is almost inevitable".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


November 24, 2008, 9:46 PM CT

Genomic signature of colon cancer may individualize treatment

Genomic signature of colon cancer may individualize treatment
Scientists in the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy have developed a model for predicting risk of recurrence in early stage patients with colon cancer, and have used the model to also predict sensitivity to chemotherapy and targeted treatment regimens.

"These findings have important implications for individualizing treatment," said Katherine Garman, M.D., a gastroenterology fellow at Duke and lead investigator on the study. "By examining gene expression in early-stage colon cancer tumors, we have found certain patterns that seem to put some patients at higher risk for recurrence. By identifying these patients up front, we may be able to treat them in a targeted and proactive manner to prevent this recurrence and help them live longer and healthier lives".

The findings are due to appear in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, between November 24 and November 26, 2008. The study was funded by the Emilene Brown Cancer Research Fund and the National Institutes of Health.

The scientists studied gene expression data from 52 samples of early stage colon cancer tumors, looking for patterns. Then they correlated the gene expression patterns with patient progress reports to track the recurrence of cancer. The predictive power of the correlations was subsequently tested in two independent data sets from 55 and 73 tumors, respectively.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


November 24, 2008, 9:44 PM CT

Bittersweet milestones

Bittersweet milestones
For a number of of the elderly, the golden years are anything but. Faced with health problems, financial issues and the death of a spouse or loved one, a number of adults 65 years and older suffer from depression. While research is emerging to help this group understand and treat the problem, another group - centenarians - has been left largely in the dark.

"Centenarians are still rare, and depression hasn't been studied thoroughly in this group," said Adam Davey, a developmental psychology expert in the College of Health Professions at Temple University. "We've observed that it's a very under diagnosed condition among people over 100 years old, yet it's one of the most easily treated forms of mental illness".

As per the U.S. Bureau of the Census, more than 60,000 people in the U.S. are 100 years old or over, and as baby boomers start to hit their 100-year mark, that number is expected to more than quadruple to 274,000. As a result of this new boom, a group of scientists have been studying this group more and more to learn about successful late-life aging.

In a study presented at the Gerontological Society of America's annual meeting on Nov. 24, lead author Davey and his colleagues from institutions across the country looked at indicators of depression among respondents enrolled in the Georgia Centenarian Study, a three-phased project to study quality of life for those over age 100.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 24, 2008, 9:42 PM CT

Mammograms may detect some cancers that would have otherwise regressed

Mammograms may detect some cancers that would have otherwise regressed
Breast cancer rates increased significantly in four Norwegian counties after women there began undergoing mammography every two years, as per a report in the November 24 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Rates among regularly screened women remained higher than rates among women of the same age who were screened only once after six years, suggesting that some of the cancers detected by mammography may have spontaneously regressed had they not been discovered and treated.

Throughout Europe, the start of screening mammography programs has been linked to increased occurence rate of breast cancer, as per background information in the article. "If all of these newly detected cancers were destined to progress and become clinically evident as women age, a fall in incidence among older women should soon follow," the authors write. "The fact that this decrease is not evident raises the question: What is the natural history of these additional screen-detected cancers?".

Per-Henrik Zahl, M.D., Ph.D., of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, and his colleagues examined breast cancer rates among 119,472 women age 50 to 64 who were all invited to participate in three rounds of screening mammograms between 1996 and 2001 as part of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. They compared these to rates among a control group of 109,784 women age 50 to 64 in 1992, who would have been invited for screening if the program had existed at that time. Cancers were tracked for six years using a national registry, and at the end of that time all participants were invited to undergo a one-time screening to assess breast cancer prevalence.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 24, 2008, 9:40 PM CT

High blood pressure in the doctor's office may not predict heart risks

High blood pressure in the doctor's office may not predict heart risks
Continuously measuring blood pressure may help predict heart disease and related deaths among individuals with therapy-resistant hypertension, while blood pressure readings taken in a medical office do not appear to predict future heart risks, as per a report in November 24 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

About 10 percent to 30 percent of individuals with hypertension have a condition known as resistant hypertension, as per background information in the article. For these patients, blood pressure remains high despite therapy with at least three antihypertensive drugs, always including a diuretic (medicine that increases urine output). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, or measuring blood pressure at regular intervals throughout the day, is increasingly important in managing patients with this condition because of the possibility of a white-coat effect (when an individual only has hypertension at the physician's office).

Gil F. Salles, M.D., Ph.D., studied 556 patients with resistant high blood pressure who attended an outpatient clinic between 1999 and 2004. Participants underwent a clinical examination and had their blood pressure monitored continuously during a 24-hour period (every 15 minutes throughout the day and every 30 minutes at night). They were followed up at least three to four times a year until December 2007.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 24, 2008, 9:39 PM CT

Telephone counseling may be as effective as face-to-face counseling

Telephone counseling may be as effective as face-to-face counseling
CHICAGO Face-to-face and telephone follow-up sessions appear to be more effective in the maintenance of weight loss for women from rural communities compared with weight loss education alone, as per a report in the November 24 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. In addition, telephone counseling appears to be just as effective as face-to-to face counseling for weight loss management.

"Rural counties in the United States have higher rates of obesity, sedentary lifestyle and associated chronic diseases than nonrural areas, yet therapy of obesity in the rural population has received little research attention," as per background information in the article. Studies have shown that diet, exercise and behavior changes can produce significant weight loss and that extended care programs such as clinic-based follow-up sessions can improve weight loss maintenance. "However, in rural communities, distance to health care centers represents a significant barrier to ongoing care".

Michael G. Perri, Ph.D., of the University of Florida, Gainesville, and his colleagues conducted a randomized trial involving 234 obese women (age 50 to 75) who completed a six-month weight loss program in six medically underserved rural communities. The women were randomly assigned to three different extended-care programs consisting of 26 biweekly sessions for one year; 72 participants received telephone counseling, 83 received face-to-face counseling and 79 received biweekly newsletters containing weight loss maintenance tips. Estimated program costs were also assessed.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 24, 2008, 9:30 PM CT

Smoking, teens and their parents

Smoking, teens and their parents
A new study observed that adolescents were at the greatest risk of smoking when their parents began smoking at an early age and the parents' smoking quickly reached high levels and persisted over time.

The study, reported in the recent issue of Health Psychology, draws from the long-running Indiana University Smoking Survey and builds on prior research that suggests smoking behavior is influenced by both genetics and the environment.

"This particular study focuses more on the genetic influence in the specific case of a parent's smoking behavior impacting a teenage son or daughter's smoking," said Jon Macy, project director of the IU Smoking Survey in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. "The study findings suggest that the characteristics of early onset and high levels of long-term smoking are great candidates for behavioral and molecular genetic studies of the causes of smoking and how smoking behavior is passed from one generation to the next.

"Of course, environmental influences on adolescents such as parenting practices, availability of cigarettes in the home, and parents' attitudes about smoking are equally as important and can be addressed with effective public health interventions including family-based smoking prevention programs".........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 21, 2008, 8:19 PM CT

Better cancer diagnosis, drugs

Better cancer diagnosis, drugs
A Florida State University College of Medicine research team led by Yanchang Wang has discovered an important new layer of regulation in the cell division cycle, which could lead to a greater understanding of the way cancer begins.

Wang, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the College of Medicine, said the findings will lead to an improved ability to diagnose cancer and could lead to the design of new drugs that kill cancer cells by inhibiting cell reproduction. His paper on the discovery has been reported in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

"The correct timing of chromosome segregation during cell division is necessary to ensure normal, healthy growth," Wang said. "Now we have discovered a previously undetected layer of regulation in how the chromosomes separate, which helps to ensure the correct timing and decreases the potential for the formation of malignant growth".

The cell division cycle is a collection of tightly regulated events that lead to cell duplication. The most important events are the doubling of the hereditary information encoded within a set of chromosomes, and the division of that duplicated information into two daughter cells that are genetically identical to each other and the mother cell.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   156   157   158   159   160   161   162   163   164   165   166   167   168   169   170   171   172   173   174   175   176   177   178   179   180   181   182   183   184   185   186   187   188   189   190   191   192   193   194   195   196   197   198   199   200   201   202   203   204   205   206   207   208   209   210   211   212   213   214   215   216   217   218   219   220   221   222   223   224   225   226   227   228   229   230   231   232   233   234   235   236   237   238   239   240   241   242   243   244   245   246   247   248   249   250   251   252   253   254   255   256   257   258   259   260   261   262   263   264   265   266   267   268   269   270   271   272   273   274   275   276   277   278   279   280   281   282   283   284   285   286   287   288   289   290   291   292   293   294   295   296   297   298   299   300   301   302   303   304   305   306   307   308   309   310   311   312   313   314   315   316   317   318   319   320   321   322   323   324   325   326   327   328   329   330   331   332   333   334   335   336   337   338   339   340   341   342   343   344   345   346   347   348   349   350   351   352   353   354   355   356   357   358   359   360   361   362   363   364   365   366   367   368   369   370   371   372   373   374   375   376   377   378   379  

Did you know?
Studies in monkeys and women suggest that unlike traditional estrogen therapy, a diet high in the natural plant estrogens found in soy does not increase the risk of uterine cancer in postmenopausal women, according to Mark Cline, D.V.M., Ph.D., an associate professor of comparative medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.