MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog


Go Back to the main health news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Health News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


August 24, 2007, 5:10 AM CT

Single-incision belly-button surgery to remove kidney

Single-incision belly-button surgery to remove kidney
Using high-dexterity instruments, Dr. Jeffrey Cadeddu successfully removed a patient's kidney by performing a unique laproscopic nephrectomy entirely through the belly button.
Surgeons specializing in laparoscopic procedures at UT Southwestern Medical Center have successfully removed a patients kidney by performing a unique nephrectomy entirely through the belly button.

Dr. Jeffrey Cadeddu, associate professor of urology and radiology, performed the single keyhole access surgery, the first of its kind involving a kidney. The entire procedure was completed with only one incision and will leave the patient with a barely noticeable scar tucked in the umbilicus, or navel.

We are proud of this novel surgical technique, said Dr. Cadeddu, who leads the Clinical Center for Minimally Invasive Treatment of Urologic Cancer. Laparoscopic surgery already gives patients smaller incisions, less pain and a faster recovery. This transumbilical technique is a further extension of laparoscopic surgery, which essentially removes scarring from the patients skin.

Dr. Claus Roehrborn, chairman of urology at UT Southwestern, said, Single-access surgery is the next major advance in making surgery even less invasive. For Dr. Cadeddu to be the first to perform such a surgery and remove the intact organ in this manner is a testament to the tremendous advances in clinical medicine that are being made at UT Southwestern and in our department. Dr. Roehrborn is director of the Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay Center for Pediatric Urology.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


August 24, 2007, 5:08 AM CT

Bipolar disorder relapses halved

Bipolar disorder relapses halved
Melbourne mental health scientists have succeeded in halving the number of relapses experienced by people with bipolar disorder which strikes two in 100 Australians, accounts for 12 per cent of suicides each year and costs the country at least $1.5 billion annually(1).

With funding from the MBF Foundation and Beyond Blue, a team led by the Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria has developed an innovative structured group program to help people with bipolar disorder to better manage their condition.

The 12-session program, led by trained mental health clinicians, enables people battling the disorder to effectively monitor their mood, assess personal triggers and early warning signs of oncoming illness and take the necessary steps to stay well.

In a controlled randomised study of 84 people diagnosed with bipolar disorder, those on the special intervention program had half the number of relapses after 12 months as the control group which continued with normal therapy. Even with modern drug therapies that act as mood stabilisers, relapse rates for people with bipolar disorder are as high as 40 per cent in the first year and almost 75 per cent over five years.

MBF general manager health product, Michael Carafillis, said the new program provides a much-needed bridge between the mental health services that treat people when they are acutely ill and the GPs and private psychiatry experts who provide ongoing care.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


August 24, 2007, 5:06 AM CT

MSU engineering team designs innovative medical device

MSU engineering team designs innovative medical device
Blood oxygen meter

Credit: Tongtong Li
A Michigan State University engineering design team has developed a medical diagnosis system that would allow people to be inexpensively screened for a variety of medical problems.

With Tongtong Li, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, as the faculty facilitator, Joe Hines, Janelle Shane, Kevin Scheel, Thomas Casey and Kurtis Hessler teamed up with students from China and Italy in the project.The device will address the issue of affordable health care in China, where health care costs are major contributors to poverty. Eventhough Chinas health care system is in a state of reform, lack of health insurance, particularly in rural areas, prevent a number of Chinese people from seeking medical care.


The goal of the project is to develop a multifunctional medical device to help detect symptoms at no cost to patients, as well as to provide other useful healthcare-related functions.

The device performs many diagnostic functions, all of which are pressing health-care needs in rural China: blood pressure, blood oxygen saturation, temperature, glucose level and electrocardiogram. An additional online database system for patient records, and a wireless infusion bottle monitoring system, will be useful to doctors and other hospital workers, making the device beneficial not just to patients.........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source


August 23, 2007, 10:37 PM CT

Surgery for severe obesity saves lives

Surgery for severe obesity saves lives
An extensive swedish study from the Sahlgrenska Academy has established that surgery reduces premature death in patients with severe obesity. A long-term follow up has shown that mortality is significantly lower among patients who undergo surgery than among those who do not.

The results are published recently in The New England Journal (NEJM).

We show for the first time that surgery against obesity not only leads to long-term loss of weight, it also significantly reduces mortality", says Lars Sjstrm, professor emeritus at the Sahlgrenska Academy, located in Gteborg in Sweden.

Over 4,000 severely obese patients were included in the study, which Lars Sjstrm started as long ago as 1987. Half of these patients underwent stomach surgery (bariatric surgery) intended to give weight loss. The remaining patients received advice concerning lifestyle changes, also intended to give weight loss. Some of these patients also received medicines for weight loss, but even so, the conventional therapy was considerably less effective than the surgical procedure.

The group receiving conventional therapy had even increased somewhat in weight after 10 years, while patients who had undergone surgery decreased in weight by 16%, on average. Bariatric surgery is the only therapy for severe obesity for which there is scientific evidence that it reduces mortality", says Lena Carlsson, professor at the Sahlgrenska Academy.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


August 23, 2007, 10:22 PM CT

Techniques For Better Learning

Techniques For Better Learning
People have incredible amounts to learn throughout their lives, whether it be preparing for a test in middle school or training for a new job late in life. Given that time is often at a premium, being able to efficiently learn new information is important.

One way people can learn efficiently is to accurately evaluate their learning and decide how to proceed. For example, if you were studying for a final exam, you could most efficiently use your time if you were able to accurately judge between those concepts that you have learned and understood well versus those that you have not learned well. In doing so, you can invest your time on the latter.

This ability is known as metacomprehension, and psychological research has repeatedly demonstrated that people are not very accurate at judging how well they have learned complex materials. As a result, scientists have been searching for techniques to improve the accuracy of peoples judgments of their text learning, and most recently, some important discoveries have been made.

In an article reported in the recent issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, Kent State scientists John Dunlosky and Amanda Lipko examined techniques that can improve peoples comprehension of texts.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


August 21, 2007, 6:33 PM CT

Cranberries may improve chemotherapy for ovarian cancer

Cranberries may improve chemotherapy for ovarian cancer
Drinking cranberry juice may help improve the effectiveness of platinum drugs that are used in chemotherapy to fight ovarian cancer, researchers report.

Credit: Courtesy of The Cranberry Institute.
Compounds in cranberries may help improve the effectiveness of platinum drugs that are used in chemotherapy to fight ovary cancer, scientists have found in a laboratory study that will be reported today at the 234th national meeting of the American Chemical Society. The researchers demonstrated in cell culture studies that human ovary cancer cells resistant to platinum drugs became up to 6 times more sensitized to the drugs after exposure to the cranberry compounds compared to cells that were not exposed to the compounds, which were obtained from juice extracts.

Eventhough preliminary, the findings have the potential to save lives and reduce the harmful side effects linked to using high doses of platinum drugs for the therapy of ovary cancer, the scientists say, adding that human studies are still needed. The new study adds to a growing number of potential health benefits associated with cranberries.

For the first time, we have shown in our in vitro studies that cranberry extracts can sensitize resistant human ovary cancer cell lines, say study co-presenters Ajay P. Singh, Ph.D., and Nicholi Vorsa, Ph.D., natural products chemists at Rutgers University. This has opened up exciting possibilities for therapeutic intervention linked to platinum treatment, add Singh and Vorsa, who collaborated with colleagues Laurent Brard, M.D., Ph.D, Rakesh K. Singh, and K.S.Satyan, Ph.D., of Brown University.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


August 21, 2007, 6:30 PM CT

Sewage tells tales about community-wide drug abuse

Sewage tells tales about community-wide drug abuse
Image courtesy of waterextraction.com
Public health officials may soon be able to flush out more accurate estimates on illegal drug use in communities across the country thanks to screening test described here today at the 234th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the worlds largest scientific society. The test doesnt screen people, it seeks out evidence of illicit drug abuse in drug residues and metabolites excreted in urine and flushed toward municipal sewage treatment plants.

The approach could provide a fast, reliable and inexpensive way to track trends in drug use at the local, regional or state levels while preserving the anonymity of individuals, says lead researcher Jennifer Field, Ph.D., an environmental chemist at Oregon State University who works with colleagues at Oregon State University and at the University of Washington.

Past estimates of illicit drug abuse in a community were based largely on surveys in which children and adults were asked about their use of illegal drugs. Researchers knew that some were untruthful, with individuals reluctant to admit breaking the law.

Preliminary tests conducted in 10 U.S. cities show the method can simultaneously quantify methamphetamine and metabolites of cocaine and marijuana and legal drugs such as methadone, oxycodone, and ephedrine, according to Aurea Chiaia, a graduate student who is working to refine the process and described details at the ACS meeting.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


August 21, 2007, 6:08 PM CT

Vaccine thwarts the tangles of Alzheimer's

Vaccine thwarts the tangles of Alzheimer's
A new study by NYU Medical Center scientists shows for the first time that the immune system can combat the pathological form of tau protein, a key protein implicated in Alzheimers disease. The researchers, led by Einar Sigurdsson Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Pathology at New York University School of Medicine, created a vaccine in mice that suppresses aggregates of tau. The protein accumulates into harmful tangles in the memory center of the brains of Alzheimers patients.

The vaccine successfully slowed the deterioration of motor abilities produced by excessive amounts of tau in the central nervous system of mice, as per the study reported in the August 22, 2007 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. Dr. Sigurdsson plans to conduct follow-up studies using mice that slowly develop tangles and cognitive impairments without movement problems.

The study used mice that were genetically engineered to produce abnormal tau proteins early in life. These became entangled in several regions of the central nervous system. The resulting loss of motor coordination was significantly reduced in those immunized with a specific piece of the detrimental tau protein. By producing antibodies that could enter the brain and bind to irregular tau, the immune system prevented their harmful aggregation and associated behavioral impairments.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 21, 2007, 5:44 PM CT

Baby talk is universal

Baby talk is universal
A major function of speech is the communication of intentions. In everyday conversation between adults, intentions are conveyed through multiple channels, including the syntax and semantics of the language, but also through nonverbal vocal cues such as pitch, loudness, and rate of speech.

The same thing occurs when we talk to infants. Regardless of the language we speak, most adults, for example, raise their voices to elicit the infants attention and talk at a much slower rate to communicate effectively. In the scientific community, this baby talk is termed infant-directed speech.

There are direct relationships between the way we speak and what we wish to convey. For example, when we see a child reaching for the electrical socket, we do not call out their name as we would during a game of hide-and-go-seek.

Scientists Greg Bryant and Clark Barrett, at the University of California, Los Angeles, propose that the relationships between sounds and intentions are universal, and thus, should be understood by anyone regardless of the language they speak.

To test their hypothesis, Bryant and Barrett recorded native English-speaking mothers as if they were talking to their own child and then as if they were speaking to an adult. The speech varied across four categories: prohibitive, approval, comfort, and attention. Then, they played the recordings to habitants of a Shuar (South American hunter-horticulturalists) village in Ecuador to see if the participants could discriminate between infant-directed (ID) and adult-directed (AD) speech, and whether they could tell the difference between the categories in both types of speech.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


August 21, 2007, 5:43 PM CT

Optimal drug dose of common anticoagulant

Optimal drug dose of common anticoagulant
Genetic testing can be used to help personalize the therapeutic dosage of warfarin, a commonly-used anticoagulant, as per research reported in the September 1, 2007, issue of Blood, the journal of the American Society of Hematology. This result represents one of the first applications of using an individuals genetic information to guide personal medical care.

Because individuals metabolize drugs differently, varying doses of warfarin are needed for the drug to be effective in each patient. Too much warfarin can cause severe bleeding, and too little can cause dangerous blood clots. Currently, there is little guidance for predicting how much of the drug a person will need. Physicians have had to roughly estimate an initial dose of warfarin and then continually monitor a patients International Normalized Ratio (INR) value (a measure of how fast the blood clots), during therapy to tweak the dosage by trial and error.

For the first time, a group of St. Louis scientists combined the standard INR method with genetic testing to predict the therapeutic warfarin dose. Since warfarin is often prescribed after major orthopedic surgery to prevent blood clots in the legs, the study followed 92 adults undergoing either total hip or knee replacement at the Washington University Medical Center, who had never previously taken the anticoagulant.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   156   157   158   159   160   161   162   163   164   165   166   167   168   169   170   171   172   173   174   175   176   177   178   179   180   181   182   183   184   185   186   187   188   189   190   191   192   193   194   195   196   197   198   199   200   201   202   203   204   205   206   207   208   209   210   211   212   213   214   215   216   217   218   219   220   221   222   223   224   225   226   227   228   229   230   231   232   233   234   235   236   237   238   239   240   241   242   243   244   245   246  

Did you know?
Studies in monkeys and women suggest that unlike traditional estrogen therapy, a diet high in the natural plant estrogens found in soy does not increase the risk of uterine cancer in postmenopausal women, according to Mark Cline, D.V.M., Ph.D., an associate professor of comparative medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.