MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog


Go Back to the main health news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Health News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


November 7, 2007, 5:04 AM CT

Does fear of weight gain keep you away from quitting smoking?

Does fear of weight gain keep you away from quitting smoking?
Is a fear of getting fatter partly to blame for the fact that nearly one in five American women still smokes, and a number of dont try to quit".

Eventhough there are a number of possible reasons for the stubborn persistence of smoking, fear of weight gain is high on the list for a number of women, says a University of Michigan Health System researcher who has devoted much of her career to studying this issue.

Several years ago, she and her team reported that 75 percent of all women smokers say they would be unwilling to gain more than five pounds if they were to quit smoking, and nearly half said they would not tolerate any weight gain. In fact, a number of women started smoking in the first place because they thought it might help them stay slim.

Now, new U-M research findings reported in the recent issue of Addictive Behaviors show that women who smoke tend to be further from their ideal body image, and more prone to dieting and bingeing, than those who dont smoke.

Cigarettes are well known to suppress appetite and weight, says Cindy Pomerleau, Ph.D., director of the U-M Nicotine Research Laboratory. So its hardly surprising that women who have trouble managing their weight or are dissatisfied with their bodies are drawn to smoking, she says.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 7, 2007, 5:01 AM CT

Grape, wine and Alzheimer's disease

Grape, wine and Alzheimer's disease
With National Alzheimers Awareness Month upon us, attention continues to focus on new approaches to cognitive health in an aging population. Now, research with grape polyphenols presented today at Neuroscience 2007 in San Diego shows promise for maintaining long-term cognitive health. The scientists will now focus on grape polyphenols and Alzheimers disease (AD) at the newly established Center for Research in Alternative and Complementary Medicine in Alzheimers disease research at Mount Sinai School of Medicine (MSSM).

Two recent population studies associated moderate red wine and 100 percent fruit juice consumption with lowering the risk of AD dementia (wine) or delay in AD onset (juice). Adding further weight to those studies is the research presented by Dr. Lap Ho at Neuroscience 2007, which demonstrated the potentially protective effect of Concord grape juice and Cabernet Sauvignon polyphenols to slow beta-amyloid neuropathology.

A characteristic hallmark of Alzheimers disease-type neuropathology is the accumulation of beta-amyloid peptides and their formation into plaques in the brain. Dr. Ho at MSSM observed that polyphenol extracts from Cabernet Sauvignon and Concord grape juice reduced the generation and accumulation of beta-amyloid peptides in experimental models of Alzheimers disease.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


November 6, 2007, 10:29 PM CT

Research Links Diet to Cognitive Decline and Dementia

Research Links Diet to Cognitive Decline and Dementia
Research has shown convincing evidence that dietary patterns practiced during adulthood are important contributors to age-related cognitive decline and dementia risk. An article published in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences highlights information on the benefits of diets high in fruit, vegetables, cereals and fish and low in saturated fats in reducing dementia risk.

Adults with diabetes are particularly sensitive to the foods they eat with respect to cognitive function. Specifically, an adult with diabetes will experience a decline in memory function after a meal, particularly if simple carbohydrate foods are consumed. While the precise physiological mechanisms underlying these dietary influences are not completely understood, the modulation of brain insulin levels likely contributes.

This deficit can be prevented through healthful food choices at meals. The findings suggest that weight maintenance reduces the risk of developing obesity-associated disorders, such as hypertension and high cholesterol, and is an important component of preserving cognitive health.

The work shows another benefit of maintaining healthful eating practices with aging - the same ones proposed by most diabetes and heart & stroke foundations. "This type of information should be able to empower the individual, knowing that he/she can be actively engaged in activities and lifestyles that should support cognitive health with aging," says Carol Greenwood, author of the study.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


November 6, 2007, 10:24 PM CT

Blood pressure drug curbs brain damage from PTSD

Blood pressure drug curbs brain damage from PTSD
A drug used to treat hypertension and enlargement of the prostate may protect the brain from damage caused by post-traumatic stress disorder, Alzheimer's disease, depression and schizophrenia.

Prazosin, also prescribed as an antipsychotic medication, appears to block the increase of steroid hormones known as glucocorticoids, Oregon Health & Science University and Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center scientists have found. Elevated levels of glucocorticoids are linked to atrophy in nerve branches where impulses are transmitted, and even nerve cell death, in the hippocampus.

The hippocampus is the elongated ridge located in the cerebral cortex of the brain where emotions and memory are processed.

"It's known, from human studies, that corticosteroids are not good for you cognitively," said co-author of study S. Paul Berger, M.D., assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience, OHSU School of Medicine and the PVAMC. "We think prazosin protects the brain from being damaged by excessive levels of corticosteroid stress hormones".

The study, titled "Prazosin attenuates dexamethasone-induced HSP70 expression in the cortex," is being presented during a poster session today at Neuroscience 2007, the annual Society for Neuroscience conference in San Diego.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


November 5, 2007, 10:22 PM CT

Changing the way doctors treat high blood pressure

Changing the way doctors treat high blood pressure
A simplified, step-care protocol for treating hypertension was more effective than guidelines-based practice in helping people reduce their blood pressure, as per late-breaking clinical trial results presented at the American Heart Associations Scientific Sessions 2007.

The Simplified Treatment Intervention to Control High blood pressure (STITCH) trial was a study of 2,104 patients with hypertension (hypertension) at 45 family practices in southwestern Ontario, Canada. In order to increase the number of people with high blood pressure who reduce their blood pressure to goal levels, scientists wanted to see if there was a simpler way to direct therapy for high blood pressure than by following national guidelines for optimal management of blood pressure.

The complexity of existing guidelines for the management of high blood pressure could be a barrier to effective treatment, said Ross D Feldman, M.D., R.W. Gunton Professor of Therapeutics, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. To examine this question, we conducted a cluster randomization trial. Family practices were randomly assigned to implement a simplified step-care algorithm (STITCH-care) or Guidelines-based care for the management of hypertension.

The STITCH algorithm consisted of 4 steps: 1) initiate treatment with ACE-inhibitor/diuretic or Angiotensin receptor blocker/diuretic combination 2) up-titrate combination treatment to the highest does 3) add a calcium channel blocker and up-titrate 4) add one of the non-first line antihypertensive agents. In the Guidelines-care arm physicians were educated on the use of existing national guidelines of the Canadian High blood pressure Education Program, which list 12 options for initial treatment depending on the type of high blood pressure and co-existing medical conditions (very similar to the range of options outlined in the US JNC guidelines).........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


November 5, 2007, 9:19 PM CT

Floating effective for stress and pain

Floating effective for stress and pain
Relaxation in large, sound- and light-proof tanks with high-salt water floating is an effective way to alleviate long-term stress-related pain. This has been shown by Sven-ke Bood, who recently completed his doctorate in psychology, with a dissertation from Karlstad University in Sweden.

The dissertation confirms what earlier studies have indicated: sleep was improved, patients felt more optimistic, and the content of the vitalizing hormone prolactin increased. Anxiety, stress, depression, and perception of pain declined. Those who took part in the research project all had some form of stress-related pain, and after only twelve therapys in the floating tank, their condition improved.

Through relaxing in floating tanks, people with long-term fibromyalgia, for instance, or depression and anxiety felt substantially better after only twelve therapys. Relaxing in a weightless state in the silent, warm floating tank activates the bodys own system for recuperation and healing. The stress hormone decreases, as does blood pressure. The findings confirm and reinforce our earlier studies on the effects of relaxing in a floating tank," says Sven-ke Bood.

A number of people experience improvement

His dissertation comprises four studies that all involve the therapy of pain and stress-related disorders with the aid of a floating tank. A control group that was not treated in a floating tank experienced no improvement in their health. After a period of therapy lasting a total of seven weeks, 22 percent of the participants in the floating group were entirely free of pain, and 56 experienced a clear improvement. Nineteen percent felt no change and 3 percent felt worse. And the effect persists after the therapy is completed. The research project has been under way for four years and has included 140 individuals, all with some form of diagnosis involving stress-related long-term pain.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


November 5, 2007, 8:56 PM CT

Do Women Fare Worse with Some Heart Devices?

Do Women Fare Worse with Some Heart Devices?
While ICDs-implantable cardioverter defibrillators-are the device of choice to manage abnormal heart rhythms, a new study led by heart specialists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine suggests that women with ICDs fare less well than their male counterparts.

In a retrospective analysis to be presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions 2007 on Sunday, November 4 (Poster #C148; 3 p.m.), lead researcher Andrea Russo, M.D., Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine, suggests that despite the proven overall effectiveness of the devices, women had a greater risk of dying than men.

Using data from the completed INTRINSIC RV trial, the scientists compared results from 1237 men and 293 women. (The INTRINSIC RV trial, which was completed in 2006, compared dual- and single-chamber ICDs.)

"There is a paucity of data comparing outcome and arrhythmic events in men vs. women with ICDs," said Dr. Russo, who is also Director of the Electrophysiology Laboratory at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. "We chose the INTRINSIC RV study because it enrolled the largest total number of women.".

The scientists observed that women with ICDs mandatory hospitalization and had a higher mortality than men with the device. However, after adjusting for other factors, such as the presence of coronary artery disease, heart failure and medical therapy, these gender differences in outcome were no longer present.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


November 5, 2007, 8:41 PM CT

Breaking a sweat means less pounds later

Breaking a sweat means less pounds later
Don't slack off on exercise if you want to avoid packing on the pounds as you age.

A consistently high level of physical activity from young adulthood into middle age increases the odds of maintaining a stable weight and lessens the amount of weight gained over time, as per a new analysis from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

People who reported at least 30 minutes of vigorous activity a day such as jogging, bicycling or swimming were more than twice as likely to maintain a stable Body Mass Index (BMI) over 20 years. BMI is a measure of body fat based on height and weight. But even highly active people who gained weight, gained 14 pounds less over 20 years than those with consistently low activity.

Eventhough activity is commonly recommended as a way to prevent weight gain, this is one of the first studies to examine the relationship between activity and weight by looking at patterns of exercise over a long period of time.

Scientists examined data from over 2,600 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study to determine if high activity patterns over time were linked to maintaining a stable BMI. Participants in CARDIA, who were 18 to 30 years old when the study began, have been tracked for 20 years.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


November 5, 2007, 8:34 PM CT

Environmental stress and cancer

Environmental stress and cancer
Drs. Kapil Bhalla (left) and Yonghua Yang.

Credit: Medical College of Georgia
One way environmental stress causes cancer is by reducing the activity level of an enzyme that causes cell death, scientists say.

They observed that stress-inducing agents, such as oxidative stress, recruit a protein called SENP1 that cuts a regulator called SUMO1 away from the enzyme SIRT1 so its activity level drops, says Dr. Yonghua Yang, postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Kapil Bhalla, director of the MCG Cancer Center.

This fundamental finding about the relationship between stress and cancer opens the door for therapys that increase SENP1 activity, making it easier for cells that are becoming malignant to die, says Dr. Yang, first author on a paper reported in the recent issue of Nature Cell Biology.

This is one of the things that makes cancer cells so durable, one way they survive so well, says Dr. Yang. We want to see if we can block that process and make cells die. Increased SIRT1 activity which is routinely present in cancer even makes cancer cells more resistant to anticancer drugs such as chemotherapy.

The complication is that decreasing programmed cell death, or apoptosis, increases longevity, says Dr. Yang. However he now has evidence that SIRT1 also under study for its longevity role has different targets when it comes to cancer promotion and longevity that will provide distinct targets for manipulating each.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 5, 2007, 8:31 PM CT

Breastfeeding boost IQ in infants

Breastfeeding boost IQ in infants
Breastfeeding boosts infants IQs, but only if the babies have a genetic variant that enhances their metabolism of breast milk, a Yale researcher and collaborators report today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

It is this genetic variant in FADS2, a gene involved in the control of fatty acid pathways, that may help the children make better use of the breast milk and promote the brain development that is linked to a higher IQ score, said Julia Kim-Cohen, assistant professor of psychology and a member of the research team.

Children who do not carry the helpful genetic variant have normal average IQ scores, Kim-Cohen said. Being breastfed for them is not linked to an IQ advantage.

The study included scientists from Kings College, London, Duke University, and the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand.

The intelligence quotient (IQ) has long been at the heart of debates about nature versus nurture. Twin studies document both strong genetic influences and nongenetic environmental influences on IQ, especially for young children.

This study looked at how long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAS), which are present in human milk but not in cows milk or most infant formulas, are metabolized. LC-PUFAS in breast milk, the authors said, is believed to enhance cognitive development because the fatty acids are mandatory for efficient neurotransmission and are involved in neuronal growth and regeneration.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   156   157   158   159   160   161   162   163   164   165   166   167   168   169   170   171   172   173   174   175   176   177   178   179   180   181   182   183   184   185   186   187   188   189   190   191   192   193   194   195   196   197   198   199   200   201   202   203   204   205   206   207   208   209   210   211   212   213   214   215   216   217   218   219   220   221   222   223   224   225   226   227   228   229   230   231   232   233   234   235   236   237   238   239   240   241   242   243   244   245   246   247   248   249   250   251   252   253   254   255   256   257   258   259   260   261   262   263   264   265   266   267   268   269   270   271   272   273  

Did you know?
Studies in monkeys and women suggest that unlike traditional estrogen therapy, a diet high in the natural plant estrogens found in soy does not increase the risk of uterine cancer in postmenopausal women, according to Mark Cline, D.V.M., Ph.D., an associate professor of comparative medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.