MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog


Go Back to the main health news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Health News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


September 3, 2008, 7:01 PM CT

College freshmen: pain killers and stimulants less risky than cocaine

College freshmen: pain killers and stimulants less risky than cocaine
First year college students think that occasional nonmedical use of prescription pain killers and stimulants is less risky than cocaine, but more risky than marijuana or consuming five or more alcoholic beverages every weekend, as per a new study reported in the recent issue of Prevention Science, the peer-evaluated journal of the Society for Prevention Research.

This is the first study to describe college students' perceptions about the potential harmfulness of nonmedical use of prescription pain killers and stimulants. Prior studies with high school students show that beliefs about harmfulness of illicit drugs are correlation to drug use. Nonmedical use of pain killers and stimulants can be addictive and can cause serious problems requiring emergency room therapy.

The study by Amelia Arria, Ph.D., of the Center for Substance Abuse Research at the University of Maryland, also observed that college students who can be described as "sensation-seekers" are more likely to use prescription drugs nonmedically; irrespective of how harmful they may perceive the drugs to be. Arria said "sensation-seekers are students who like novel experiences, who want to try something new and a little dangerous, like jumping off the highest diving board or placing themselves in high-risk situations. They are much more likely to use pain killers nonmedically even if they perceive the drugs to be quite harmful".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 3, 2008, 6:59 PM CT

Too much calcium in blood may increase risk of fatal prostate cancer

Too much calcium in blood may increase risk of fatal prostate cancer
Men who have too much calcium in their bloodstreams may have an increased risk of fatal prostate cancer, as per a new analysis from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and the University of Wisconsin.

"We show that men in upper range of the normal distribution of serum calcium subsequently have an almost three-fold increased risk for fatal prostate cancer," said Gary G. Schwartz, Ph.D., associate professor of cancer biology and of epidemiology and prevention at Wake Forest, a part of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Such excess calcium can be lowered, he said.

The research appears in the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Co-author Halcyon G. Skinner of the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Wisconsin stressed there is "little relationship between calcium in the diet and calcium in serum. So men needn't be concerned about reducing their ordinary dietary intakes of calcium".

Schwartz and Skinner analyzed the results of 2,814 men who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES-1). Measurement of the amount of calcium in the bloodstreams was determined an average of 9.9 years before prostate cancer was diagnosed.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


September 3, 2008, 6:57 PM CT

Defibrillators save lives, don't diminish quality of life

Defibrillators save lives, don't diminish quality of life
Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) reduce the risk of death from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) among patients with heart failure, and they do so without significantly altering a person's quality of life, say scientists from Duke University Medical Center.

The finding from the longest and most comprehensive study to date of ICD use to prevent SCA may go a long way toward easing doctor and patient concerns about the side effects of the treatment.

"Basically, we wanted to find out if ICD treatment improves longevity but only at the cost of worse quality of life," says Dr. Daniel Mark, a heart specialist at Duke and the lead author of the study appearing in the September 4 issue of the New England Journal (NEJM).

The ICD used in the study was a relatively simple model implanted in the upper part of patients' chests on an outpatient basis. An ICD monitors the heartbeat for arrhythmia and delivers a jolt of electricity to restore normal rhythm if needed. Some patients describe the shocks as painful and unsettling, and earlier studies suggested that the mere anticipation of being shocked can cause significant anxiety.

Mark and his colleagues prospectively studied 2521 patients enrolled from 1997 to 2001 in the Sudden Cardiac Death in Heart Failure Trial. All participants received state-of-the-art medical treatment for heart failure. In addition, one third of the patients were randomly assigned to receive an ICD, a second group was assigned to receive the anti-arrhythmia drug amiodarone and a third group took an amiodarone placebo.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


September 3, 2008, 6:55 PM CT

Natural childbirth makes mothers more responsive to own baby-cry

Natural childbirth makes mothers more responsive to own baby-cry
A new study has observed that mothers who delivered vaginally in comparison to caesarean section delivery (CSD) were significantly more responsive to the cry of their own baby, identified through MRI brain scans two to four weeks after delivery.

The results of the study, would be published recently in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, suggest that vaginal delivery (VD) mothers are more sensitive to own baby-cry in the regions of the brain that are believed to regulate emotions, motivation and habitual behaviours.

CSD is a surgical procedure, in which delivery occurs via incisions in the abdominal and uterine wall. It is considered necessary under some conditions to protect the health or survival of infant or mother, but it is controversially linked with postpartum depression. In the US the occurrence of CSD has increased steeply from 4.5% of all deliveries in 1965 to a recent high in 2006 of 29.1%.

The critical capacity of adults to develop the thoughts and behaviours needed for parents to care successfully for their newborn infants is supported by specific brain circuits and a range of hormones. The experience of childbirth by VD compared with CSD uniquely involves the pulsatile release of oxytocin from the posterior pituitary, uterine contractions and vagino-cervical stimulation. Oxytocin is a key mediator of maternal behaviour in animals.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


September 3, 2008, 6:54 PM CT

Height linked to risk of prostate cancer development

Height linked to risk of prostate cancer development
A man's height is a modest marker for risk of prostate cancer development, but is more strongly associated with progression of the cancer, say British scientists who conducted their own study on the connection and also evaluated 58 published studies.

In the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, 12 scientists at four universities in England studied more than 9,000 men with and without prostate cancer and estimated that the risk of developing the disease rises by about six percent for every 10 centimeters (3.9 inches) in height a man is over the shortest group of men in the study. That means a man who is one foot taller than the shortest person in the study would have a 19 percent increased risk of developing the disease.

Still, these increases in risk are a lot less than those linked with other established risk factors, such as age, family history of the disease, and race. Because of that, the scientists do not suggest that taller men be screened more often than is typical, or that their cancer therapy be altered.

"In comparison to other risk factors, the magnitude of the additional risk of being taller is small, and we do not think that it should interfere with preventive or clinical decisions in managing prostate cancer," said the study's lead author, Luisa Zuccolo, M.Sc., of the Department of Social Medicine at the University of Bristol. "But the insight arising from this research is of great scientific interest. Little is known on the causes of prostate cancer and this association with height has opened up a new line of scientific inquiry".........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


September 3, 2008, 6:51 PM CT

Higher protein breakfast may help dieters stay on track

Higher protein breakfast may help dieters stay on track
A new study published online today in the British Journal of Nutrition observed that timing of dietary protein intake affects feelings of fullness throughout the day. The study concluded that when people ate high-quality protein foods, from sources such as eggs and lean Canadian bacon, for breakfast they had a greater sense of sustained fullness throughout the day in comparison to when more protein was eaten at lunch or dinner.i .

"There is a growing body of research which supports eating high-quality protein foods when dieting to maintain a sense of fullness," said Wayne W. Campbell, PhD, study author and professor of Foods and Nutrition at Purdue University. "This study is especially unique in that it looked at the timing of protein intake and reveals that when you consume more protein may be a critical piece of the equation".

A Closer Look at the Study
The study included overweight or obese men who ate a reduced calorie diet. The diet consisted of two variations of protein intakes, both which were within federal nutrition recommendations: normal protein intake (11-14 percent of calories) or increased protein (18-25 percent of calories). The scientists tested the effect of consuming the additional protein at specific meals breakfast, lunch or dinner or spaced evenly throughout the day.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 3, 2008, 6:44 PM CT

Substance found in fruits and vegetables reduces likelihood of the flu

Substance found in fruits and vegetables reduces likelihood of the flu
Mice given quercetin, a naturally occurring substance found in fruits and vegetables, were less likely to contract the flu, as per a research studypublished by The American Physiological Society. The study also observed that stressful exercise increased the susceptibility of mice to the flu, but quercetin canceled out that negative effect.

Quercetin, a close chemical relative of resveratrol, is present in a variety of fruits and vegetables, including red onions, grapes, blueberries, tea, broccoli and red wine. It has been shown to have anti-viral properties in cell culture experiments and some animal studies, but none of these studies has looked specifically at the flu.

The study, "Quercetin reduces susceptibility to influenza infection following stressful exercise," was carried out by J. Mark Davis, E.A. Murphy, J.L. McClellan, and M.D. Carmichael, of the University of South Carolina and J.D. Gangemi of Clemson University. The study appears in the current issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

The study was conducted using mice, but if quercetin provides a similar benefit for humans, it could help endurance athletes, soldiers and others undergoing difficult training regimens, as well as people under psychological stress, as per Davis.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


September 3, 2008, 6:42 PM CT

Higher rates of cervical cancer amongst immigrants

Higher rates of cervical cancer amongst immigrants
Gynaecological screening tests for cervical cancer have been available to all women in Sweden for almost four decades. Despite this, a number of immigrant women have a higher risk of developing the disease than Swedish-born women, as per a new study from Karolinska Institutet.

This is especially the case for women from other Nordic countries and Central America, the differences being associated with, amongst other things, variation in the occurence rate of the Human Pappiloma Virus (HPV) around the world. HPV is a significant risk factor for cervical cancer.

"But there are other risk factors too, such as smoking, sexual habits and not taking screening tests, which make it interesting to compare cervical cancer rates between different groups of immigrant women in Sweden and native Swedes," says Professor Pär Sparen, who has led the study at the Department of Medical epidemiology and Biostatistics.

The study included more than 750,000 resident immigrant women from different countries, all of whom are registered on Karolinska Institutets national database of womens health. During the period under study (1968 to 2004) there were 1,991 cases of cervical cancer in this group. Compared with Swedish-born women in general, this represents a slightly higher risk of developing the disease (10 per cent). Also, the incidence proportion of cervical cancer amongst women who had immigrated to Sweden was lower than amongst women in their respective countries.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


September 3, 2008, 6:38 PM CT

NTP finalizes report on Bisphenol A

NTP finalizes report on Bisphenol A
Current human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical used in a number of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, is of "some concern" for effects on development of the prostate gland and brain and for behavioral effects in fetuses, infants and children, as per a final report released recently by the National Toxicology Program (NTP).

The report provides the NTP's current opinion on BPA's potential to cause harm to human reproduction or development. The conclusions are based primarily on a broad body of research involving numerous laboratory animal studies. The report is part of a lengthy review of the scientific literature on BPA and takes into consideration public and peer review comments received on an earlier draft report. The final report is available at http://cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/chemicals/bisphenol/bisphenol.pdf.

"There remains considerable uncertainty whether the changes seen in the animal studies are directly applicable to humans, and whether they would result in clear adverse health effects," said NTP Associate Director John Bucher, Ph.D. "But we have concluded that the possibility that BPA may affect human development cannot be dismissed."

About the impact that these findings may have on consumers, CERHR Director Michael Shelby, Ph.D., said, "Unfortunately, it is very difficult to offer advice on how the public should respond to this information. More research is clearly needed to understand exactly how these findings relate to human health and development, but at this point we can't dismiss the possibility that the effects we're seeing in animals may occur in humans. If parents are concerned, they can make the personal choice to reduce exposures of their infants and children to BPA".........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


September 2, 2008, 8:08 PM CT

Age-related memory loss tied to slip in filtering information quickly

Age-related memory loss tied to slip in filtering information quickly
Researchers have identified a way in which the brain's ability to process information diminishes with age, and shown that this break down contributes to the decreased ability to form memories that is linked to normal aging.

The finding, published in the current online early edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, fuels the researchers' efforts, they say, to explore strategies for enhancing brain function in the healthy aging population, through mental training exercises and pharmaceutical therapys.

This research, which was conducted by University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley scientists, builds on the team's seminal 2005 discovery ("Nature Neuroscience," October 2005) that the brain's capacity to ignore irrelevant information diminishes with age.

The capacity to ignore irrelevant information -- such as most of the faces in a crowded room when one is looking for a long-lost friend and to enhance pertinent information -- such as the face of a new acquaintance met during the search for the old friend is key to memory formation. This process is known as top-down modulation.

In the 2005 study, the team recorded brain activity in younger and elderly adults given a visual memory test in which they were shown sequences of images (sets of two faces and two scenes), told to remember a specific category, and then asked to identify an image from that category nine seconds later. The scientists, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), determined that the neurons of the older participants (ages 60 to 72) responded excessively to the images they should have ignored, in comparison to the younger adults (ages 19 to 33). This attention to the distracting information directly correlated with how well the participants did on the memory test.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   115   116   117   118   119   120   121   122   123   124   125   126   127   128   129   130   131   132   133   134   135   136   137   138   139   140   141   142   143   144   145   146   147   148   149   150   151   152   153   154   155   156   157   158   159   160   161   162   163   164   165   166   167   168   169   170   171   172   173   174   175   176   177   178   179   180   181   182   183   184   185   186   187   188   189   190   191   192   193   194   195   196   197   198   199   200   201   202   203   204   205   206   207   208   209   210   211   212   213   214   215   216   217   218   219   220   221   222   223   224   225   226   227   228   229   230   231   232   233   234   235   236   237   238   239   240   241   242   243   244   245   246   247   248   249   250   251   252   253   254   255   256   257   258   259   260   261   262   263   264   265   266   267   268   269   270   271   272   273   274   275   276   277   278   279   280   281   282   283   284   285   286   287   288   289   290   291   292   293   294   295   296   297   298   299   300   301   302   303   304   305   306   307   308   309   310   311   312   313   314   315   316   317   318   319   320   321   322   323   324   325   326   327   328   329   330   331   332   333   334   335   336   337   338   339   340   341   342   343   344   345   346   347   348   349   350   351   352   353   354   355  

Did you know?
Studies in monkeys and women suggest that unlike traditional estrogen therapy, a diet high in the natural plant estrogens found in soy does not increase the risk of uterine cancer in postmenopausal women, according to Mark Cline, D.V.M., Ph.D., an associate professor of comparative medicine at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of health news blog

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.