MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of heart-watch-blog


Go Back to the main heart-watch-blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Heart-watch-blog From Medicineworld.Org


September 11, 2007, 11:28 PM CT

Children who learn heart healthy eating habits

Children who learn heart healthy eating habits
A new study in a mid-August edition of Circulation: Journal of the America Heart Association confirms that when young children learn about heart healthy eating habits, it can strongly influence their heart disease risk during the later part of life.

Results from the Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project have landmark implications on how children should be taught to eat. In this study, a childs fat intake, primarily reduction in intake of saturated fat, was found to be one of the greatest influencing factors, as per the research.

The publication of this study is timely since September 2007 is National Cholesterol Education Month, sponsored by the U.S. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institutes National Cholesterol Education Program.

Harri Niinikoski, M.D, Ph.D, lead author and a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of Turku in Finland, says: The aim of the diet counseling in our study was not to reduce the total number of fat calories in the diet, but to shift the childs intake from saturated toward unsaturated fats and have cholesterol intakes of less than 200 mg (such as the use of more vegetable oils than animal fats and butter.) .

Key dietary changes in the intervention families included: 1) using soft margarine and liquid oils instead of butter to maintain adequate fat intake while lowering consumption of saturated fat and cholesterol, and 2) appropriate adjustments to the type of milk consumed by the children.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 10, 2007, 10:14 PM CT

Preserving Vessel Function After Heart Attack

Preserving Vessel Function After Heart Attack
Researchers have identified the process that causes blood vessels to constrict during and after a heart attack. They've also demonstrated that delivering a vital molecule that is depleted during this process directly to those blood vessels can reverse damage and help restore blood flow.

The Ohio State University medical scientists say these findings have the potential to improve outcomes for patients with acute coronary episodes correlation to ischemia, and to ameliorate the restriction of blood supply to the heart.

The study is published online this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"This is a useful therapeutic approach and should be easy to translate," said Jay L. Zweier, director of the Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute at Ohio State University Medical Center and senior author of the study. "This should enable improved therapy of patients with unstable coronary syndromes and heart attacks, allowing enhanced restoration of blood flow and preservation of heart muscle at risk".

Researchers have known that following a heart attack blood vessels around the heart do not properly dilate and may constrict because of problems in the cells that line the vessel walls. But until now, they did not precisely understand why. Zweier and his colleagues set out to determine the cascade of events that leads to the loss of vessel vasodilatory function and, in the process, identified a potential solution that would dilate.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


September 10, 2007, 9:34 PM CT

Women less likely to change heart-disease risk habits

Women less likely to change heart-disease risk habits
Smoking, eating fattening foods and not getting enough exercise are all lifestyle habits that can lead to poor health and cardiovascular disease - more so if you have a family history. But scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have observed that women don't change these habits as often as men, even when they have relatives with heart disease.

The scientists, reporting in the recent issue of the American Heart Journal, observed that women with a family history of heart disease are less likely than men to change habits such as smoking and infrequent physical activity. They also are more likely to engage in lifestyle choices that increase their risk of heart disease than are women who did not report a history of heart disease.

"A family history of heart disease is as important an indicator of future cardiovascular health in women as it is in men - perhaps more important," said Dr. Amit Khera, assistant professor of internal medicine and senior author of the study. "And yet there is an underappreciation of cardiovascular-disease risk among young women, which may contribute to unfavorable trends in important lifestyle choices such as quitting smoking and increasing physical activity".

Scientists looked at data from more than 2,400 people between the ages of 30 and 50. Family history of premature heart disease was defined as a first-degree relative with history of heart attacks before the age of 50 in men and 55 in women.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


August 21, 2007, 5:42 PM CT

Optimal drug dose of common anticoagulant

Optimal drug dose of common anticoagulant
Genetic testing can be used to help personalize the therapeutic dosage of warfarin, a commonly-used anticoagulant, as per research reported in the September 1, 2007, issue of Blood, the journal of the American Society of Hematology. This result represents one of the first applications of using an individuals genetic information to guide personal medical care.

Because individuals metabolize drugs differently, varying doses of warfarin are needed for the drug to be effective in each patient. Too much warfarin can cause severe bleeding, and too little can cause dangerous blood clots. Currently, there is little guidance for predicting how much of the drug a person will need. Physicians have had to roughly estimate an initial dose of warfarin and then continually monitor a patients International Normalized Ratio (INR) value (a measure of how fast the blood clots), during therapy to tweak the dosage by trial and error.

For the first time, a group of St. Louis scientists combined the standard INR method with genetic testing to predict the therapeutic warfarin dose. Since warfarin is often prescribed after major orthopedic surgery to prevent blood clots in the legs, the study followed 92 adults undergoing either total hip or knee replacement at the Washington University Medical Center, who had never previously taken the anticoagulant.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 15, 2007, 9:23 PM CT

Dominant cholesterol-metabolism challenged

Dominant cholesterol-metabolism challenged
Aminophospholipid translocase concentrates the phospholipid PS on the inside of the cell.

Credit: PSU
team of scientists investigating cholesterol and lipid transport haccording toformed experiments that cast serious doubt on the dominant hypothesis of how the body rids its cells of "bad" cholesterol (LDL) and increases "good" cholesterol (HDL). Cholesterol metabolism is an area of intense inquiry because high levels of LDL cholesterol or total cholesterol put about half of all Americans at significant risk of heart disease.

The team was led by Robert A. Schlegel, Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Penn State University, and Patrick Williamson, the Edward S. Harkness Professor of Biology at Amherst College. The paper by Schlegel, Williamson, and their colleagues will be published on Wednesday, 15 August 2007, in the on-line journal PLoS One.

A protein called ABCA1 is critical for producing "good" cholesterol: patients who lack the gene for this protein produce no HDL, and as a result, suffer from heart attacks at an early age. An important question is what ABCA1 does that is so important for producing HDL.

The most popular hypothesis was put forth in 2000 by Giovanna Chimini, Group Leader of a laboratory in the Centre d'Immunologie Marseille-Luminy in France, and his colleagues. They suggested that the ABCA1 enzyme plays a major role in the transfer of a phospholipid called phosphatidylserine (PS) from the inside of the cell -- where it is normally concentrated -- across the cell membrane to the outer surface of the cell. This is a crucial first step in the mechanism by which excess lipids and cholesterol are eliminated from the body. Under normal conditions, there is a second important step. After the PS is expressed on the cell surface, the phospholipids and excess cholesterol can be loaded onto a circulating protein, apoA1, to generate an HDL cholesterol particle. HDL cholesterol carries the lipids through the blood stream to the liver, where they are dumped into the intestine for excretion or destruction.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 15, 2007, 6:11 AM CT

Air pollution linked to cardiovascular risk indices

Air pollution linked to cardiovascular risk indices
Scientists in Taiwan have shown for the first time that urban air pollution simultaneously affects key indicators of cardiovascular risk in young adults: inflammation, oxidative stress, coagulation and autonomic dysfunction.

The study, which appeared in the second issue for August of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Thoracic Society, investigated the effect of common urban air pollutants on biological markers for inflammation, oxidative stress, coagulation and autonomic dysfunction in 76 healthy Taiwanese college students.

The scientists collected blood samples and performed electrocardiograms on each subject approximately every 30 days for the months of April, May and June in either 2004 or 2005. They then correlated the sample dates and time with monitoring data from a fixed-site air monitoring station on the students campus. The concentrations of common urban air pollutants were averaged over 24, 48 and 72 hours.

They found significant increases in all indices of cardiovascular risk were linked to increased exposure to common pollutants. This study provides evidence that urban air pollution is linked to systemic inflammation/oxidative stress, impairment of the fibrinogenic system, activation of blood coagulation and alterations in the autonomic nervous system in young, healthy humans, wrote the studys lead author Chang-Chuan Chan, Sc.D., of National Taiwan Universitys College of Public Health.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 8, 2007, 7:53 PM CT

Cardio Exercise Benefits In Male Vs. Female Hearts

Cardio Exercise Benefits In Male Vs. Female Hearts
While cardiovascular disease occurs in both men and women, it does not affect them in the same way. Risk factors and protective factors for heart diseases are likewise unequal. The molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences are so far unknown, but some believe it is due to chromosomal linked genes or sexual hormones such as estrogen and testosterone. While the mechanisms behind the differences are unknown, the physiological differences are clear. A new study examining chronic exercise in male and female mice finds that moderate long-term exercise provokes a sex-dependent cardiac adaptation that is different for females versus males. The findings may eventually help improve therapy strategies for women and men with heart disease.

The study is entitled "Voluntary Exercise Induces Sex-Specific Physiological Cardiac Remodeling." It was conduced by Sebastian Brokat, Kathleen Cantow, Nadine Ehrenberg, Arne Kuhne, Jenny Thomas, and Vera Regitz-Zagrosek, all of the Center for Cardiovascular Research in Berlin, Gera number of. Dr. Brokat will discuss his team's findings at the upcoming conference, Sex and Gender in Cardiovascular-Renal Physiology and Pathophysiology, being held August 9-12, 2007 at the Hyatt Regency Austin on Town Lake in Austin, TX. The meeting is the second scientific event to be sponsored by the American Physiological Society (APS; www.The-APS.org) this year.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 8, 2007, 7:38 PM CT

Newl Pathway for Increasing HDL Cholesterol

Newl Pathway for Increasing HDL Cholesterol
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered that a group of liver enzymes called proprotein convertases (PCs) may be the key to raising levels of good cholesterol (HDL-C). The pathway by which these proteins are able to achieve an increase in HDL cholesterol involves another enzyme that normally degrades HDL-C, and was also discovered at Penn. The newly recognized relationship between these enzymes and cholesterol represents another target for ultimately controlling good cholesterol. The study appears in the current issue of Cell Metabolism.

"Several PC enzymes, called furin, PACE4, and PCSK5A, disable another enzyme called endothelial lipase by clipping off a piece of it and by activating its inhibitor," says first author Weijun Jin, MD, Research Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. "This promotes an increased level of HDL-C in the blood".

"We showed that mice engineered to express high levels of PCSK5A had 50 percent higher HDL-C than control mice," says senior author Daniel J. Rader, MD, the Cooper/McLure Professor of Medicine and Associate Director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics at Penn.

Increased HDL-C is due to decreased endothelial lipase (EL) activity. "This is encouraging because it suggests that either the PC or EL enzyme might be targets for drug treatment to raise good cholesterol, an unmet medical need in patients with low HDL-C," says Rader. What's more, the increase in HDL-C was shown to promote reverse cholesterol transport, the process by which HDL protects against heart disease.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


August 3, 2007, 10:35 PM CT

Emergency angioplasty use rises

Emergency angioplasty use rises
Compared with their counterparts a decade ago, todays heart attack patients are receiving emergency angioplasty or clot-busting drugs to re-open clogged arteries at a far greater rate, but 10 percent of patients who could benefit from this life-saving therapy still do not receive it, as per a research studypublished in The American Journal of Medicine by Yale and University of Michigan researchers.

The results also showed that the chance of missing out on lifesaving emergency therapy was highest among patients without typical symptoms like chest pain, patients who did not arrive at the hospital until six or more hours after the heart attack began, female patients, those over age 75 and non-whites.

The 10-year study was based on data from 238,291 heart attack patients between 1994 and 2003 who were listed in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction. The patients had a particular kind of heart attack called ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI). It is the most current and comprehensive look at the use of emergency reperfusion, a therapy that can restore blood flow to the heart muscle. To track the changes in emergency reperfusion treatment over time, the scientists divided the study data into three time periods: June 1994 through May 1997, June 1997 through May 2000, and June 2000 through May 2003.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


July 29, 2007, 9:57 PM CT

Stem Cells Could Lead To Heart Attack Treatments

Stem Cells Could Lead To Heart Attack Treatments
New research at the University of Nottingham, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), is paving the way for techniques that use stem cells to repair the damage caused by heart attacks.

The research, highlighted in the new issue of BBSRC Business, is looking at the process that turns a stem cell into a cardiomyocyte the beating cell that makes up the heart. The Nottingham scientists are in the process of developing a new system to monitor cardiomyocytes in real time as they differentiate from stem cells into beating heart cells. The system uses electrophysiology to record the electrical properties in a cell and will be the first time it has been used to study cardiomyocyte cells in the UK.

The scientists hope that their research could provide more detailed information on the electrical activity of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. In the longer term, this could facilitate their use in regenerating the damaged hearts of heart attack victims.

Human embryonic stem cells promise unrivalled opportunities. However, they are difficult, time-consuming and expensive to grow in the lab, Dr Denning explains. Our understanding of how to convert them into cardiomyocytes is poor. At the moment we only know how to produce a few million cardiomyocytes, but to treat just one heart attack patient, we may need one billion that all function in the correct way.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18  

Heart disease
About 13 million Americans (about 7 percent of the total population) suffer from coronary artery disease. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in American men and women amounting a staggering 20 percent of all causes of death. About half of all deaths related to cardiovascular diseases occur from coronary artery disease. Through this heart watch blog we will have our humble contribution towards making men and women aware of the risks of heart diseases.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of heart-watch-blog

Main Page| Cancer blog| Cancer blogs list| Lung cancer blog| Colon cancer blog| Prostate cancer blog| Breast cancer blog| Diabetes watch blog| Heart watch blog| Allergy blog| Bladder cancer blog| Cervical cancer blog| Colon cancer news blog| Diabetes news blog| Esophageal cancer blog| Gastric cancer blog| Health news blog| Heart news blog| Infectious disease blog| Kidney watch blog| Lung disease blog| Lung cancer news blog| Mesothelioma blog| Neurology blog| Breast cancer news blog| OBGYN blog| Ophthalmology blog| Ovarian cancer blog| Cancer news blog| Pancreas cancer blog| Pediatrics blog| Prostate cancer news blog| Psychology blog| Research blog| Rheumatology blog| Society news blog| Uterine cancer blog| Weight watch blog|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.