MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of obgyn news blog


Go Back to the main obgyn news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Obgyn News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


October 24, 2007, 8:09 PM CT

Pregnant women at risk for unnecessary operations

Pregnant women at risk for unnecessary operations
New research reported in the recent issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons suggests that pregnant women suspected of having appendicitis are often misdiagnosed and undergo unnecessary appendectomies (removal of the appendix) that can result in early delivery or loss of the fetus. The study points to the need to require more accurate diagnosis to avoid unnecessary operations and the potential for fetal loss.

Appendicitis is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women, with signs and symptoms that are similar to those of pregnancy itself. Consequently, surgeons have historically taken an aggressive approach to the therapy of suspected appendicitis in pregnant women in order to reduce the risk and possible consequences of a ruptured appendix.

Our study shows that the complication rate in pregnant women who undergo a negative appendectomy is nearly identical to those who suffer a ruptured appendix, said Marcia L. McGory, MD, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles. This finding argues for a change in the basic approach to the therapy of suspected appendicitis in pregnant women. One potential straightforward solution is to use more advanced imaging tools, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, to increase diagnostic accuracy.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


October 15, 2007, 9:52 PM CT

Oxytocin Level and Mother-Child Bond

Oxytocin Level and Mother-Child Bond
Humans are hard-wired to form enduring bonds with others. One of the primary bonds across the mammalian species is the mother-infant bond. Evolutionarily speaking, it is in a mother's best interest to foster the well-being of her child; however, some mothers just seem a bit more maternal than others do. Now, new research points to a hormone that predicts the level of bonding between mother and child.

In animals, oxytocin, dubbed "the hormone of love and bonding," is critically important for the development of parenting, is elicited during sexual intercourse, and is involved in maintaining close relationships. Animals with no oxytocin exhibit slower pup retrieval and less licking and self-grooming. These findings implicate oxytocin in the bonding process, but little research has been done on this relationship in humans.

Ruth Feldman, psychology professor at Bar-Ilan University in Israel, conducted the first study to demonstrate the links between oxytocin and bonding in human mothers. Feldman and his colleagues measured plasma oxytocin from sixty-two pregnant women during their first trimester, third trimester, and the first postpartum month.

They also observed the mother and child interact, defining the level of attachment along four aspects: gaze, affect, touch, and vocalization. Stronger attachment would mean that the mother focused her gaze mostly on the child, exhibited a positive energy towards the child, maintained constant affectionate and stimulating touch with the child, used a "motherese" speech with the child, and these species-typical maternal behaviors were adapted to the infant's alert state.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


October 8, 2007, 8:36 AM CT

Hip size of mothers linked to breast cancer in daughters

Hip size of mothers linked to breast cancer in daughters
In a study of the maternity records of more than 6,000 women, David J.P. Barker, M.D., Ph.D., and Kent Thornburg, Ph.D., of Oregon Health & Science University discovered a strong connection between the size and shape of a womans hips and her daughters risk of breast cancer. Wide, round hips, the scientists postulated, represent markers of high sex hormone concentrations in the mother, which increase her daughters vulnerability to breast cancer.

A womans hips are shaped at puberty when the growth of the hip bones is controlled by sex hormones but is also influenced by the level of nutrition. Every woman has a unique sex hormone profile which is established at puberty and persists through her reproductive life. The studys findings show for the first time that the pubertal growth spurt of girls is strongly linked to the risk of breast cancer in their daughters.

The study, carried out with colleagues in Finland and the United Kingdom., is described in an article just published online by the peer-evaluated American Journal of Human Biology. The authors followed up on 6,370 women born in Helsinki from 1934 to 1944 whose mothers pelvic bones were measured during routine prenatal care. The study observed that breast cancer rates were more than three times higher among the women in the cohort, born at or after term, whose mothers had wide hips. They were more than seven times higher if those mothers had already given birth to one or more children.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


October 2, 2007, 10:34 PM CT

First significant genetic finding in severe PMS

First significant genetic finding in severe PMS
The first significant genetic finding in premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has now been reported. PMDD is a very severe form of the more usually known premenstrual syndrome, or PMS. PMDD is heritable, affects 5-8% of women, and is linked to severe emotional and physical problems, such as irritability, marked depressed mood, anger, headaches, weight gain and more, to such an extent that quality of life is seriously impacted. Previously, scientists have shown that women with PMDD have an abnormal response to normal hormone levels and, thus, are differentially sensitive to their own hormone changes. Huo and his colleagues now report their new findings, which link PMDD with common variants in the estrogen receptor alpha gene, in an article scheduled for publication in the October 15th issue of Biological Psychiatry.

Huo and his colleagues performed genetic testing and analyses on women diagnosed with PMDD and healthy control subjects to investigate possible sources of the genetic susceptibility to experience PMDD, and found variants in the estrogen receptor alpha gene that are linked to PMDD. In other words, women with these particular genetic variants were more likely to suffer from PMDD. Importantly, the authors also discovered that this association is seen only in women with a variant form of another gene, catechol o methyltransferase (COMT), which is involved in regulating the function of the prefrontal cortex, a critical regulator of mood. David Rubinow, M.D., lead author on this project, notes that these findings may help fill in the picture of how changes in ovarian hormones can lead to depression and why they do so only in a small subset of women.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


October 1, 2007, 8:05 PM CT

Obese moms-to-be should gain less weight

Obese moms-to-be should gain less weight
Severely obese women should lose weight during pregnancy, while obese women who are pregnant should gain less weight than currently recommended, a Saint Louis University study finds.

The research is the largest population-based study to look at the effect of weight gain during pregnancy by obese expectant mothers, says Raul Artal, M.D., study author and chairman of the department of obstetrics, gynecology and womens health at Saint Louis University School of Medicine.

This study confirms what weve suspected all along -- that obese women dont have to gain any weight during their pregnancy, Dr. Artal says.

The study, reported in the recent issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, analyzed the pregnancies of more than 120,000 obese women from Missouri to see how weight gain affected preeclampsia, which is hypertension brought on by pregnancy; cesarean delivery; and birth size.

Limiting weight gain of obese women during pregnancy has a number of benefits, the study shows. Women who have a BMI of 35 and gain fewer than the currently recommended 15 pounds are less likely to develop preeclampsia, less likely to need a cesarean delivery and more likely to have a baby of normal weight. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal weight.

Obese and overweight women should gain very little weight at all, Dr. Artal says.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


October 1, 2007, 5:41 AM CT

Residual fetal cells in women may provide protection against breast cancer

Residual fetal cells in women may provide protection against breast cancer
Fetal cells that persist in a womans body long after pregnancy a common occurrence known in scientific circles as fetal microchimerism in some cases may reduce the womans risk of breast cancer, as per scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. The findings, reported in the Oct. 1 issue of Cancer Research, add to the Jekyll and Hyde characteristics of fetal microchimerism, or FMc, which has been found to be both detrimental and beneficial to womens health.

In this latest prospective study, researchers V.K. Gadi, M.D., Ph.D. and J. Lee Nelson, M.D., examined the blood of 82 women post-pregnancy, 35 of whom had had breast cancer. They looked for male DNA in the blood, presuming it was present due to a previous pregnancy. Fetal microchimerism (FMc) was found significantly more often in healthy women than women with a history of breast cancer, 43 percent versus 14 percent respectively. The researchers concluded that FMc may contribute to reduction of breast cancer based on the hypothesis that residual fetal cells may provide immune surveillance of cancerous cells in the mother. They caution that further studies are needed to confirm the theory.

To our knowledge, the current results provide the first indication that FMc could impart a protective effect against breast cancer, Gadi said.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


October 1, 2007, 5:31 AM CT

Women with severe PMS have poor sleep quality

Women with severe PMS have poor sleep quality
Women with severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS) perceive their sleep quality to be poorer in association with their symptoms in the late luteal (premenstrual) phase, despite there being no specific alterations in sleep structure linked to premenstrual symptoms, as per a research studyreported in the October 1 issue of the journal SLEEP.

The study, authored by Fiona C. Baker, PhD, of the Human Sleep Research Program at SRI International in Menlo Park, Calif., and the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, focused on nine women with PMS or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and 12 controls. The subjects, all 18-40 years of age, had laboratory-based polysomnographic recordings at two phases of the menstrual cycle: follicular phase and late luteal phase.

As per the results, women with severe PMS reported a significantly poorer subjective sleep quality during the late luteal phase, but there was no evidence of disturbed sleep based on the polysomnogram specific to premenstrual symptom expression. Both groups of women had increased wakefulness after sleep onset and increased sigma power in the late luteal phase compared with the follicular phase.

There were, however, some group differences in electroencephalographic measures regardless of menstrual phase, including decreased delta incidence and increase theta incidence and amplitude in women with PMS, suggesting the possibility of sleep electroencephalogram trait markers in women with PMS.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


September 25, 2007, 9:37 PM CT

More Babies Are Born From Monday To Friday

More Babies Are Born From Monday To Friday
Practical and financial constraints on public sector hospitals could be dictating how and when babies are born. Two new studies (1,2) show that as the number of elective, planned caesarean sections rises, more and more babies are born during the week and fewer come into the world at weekends. It appears that hospitals schedule births during the week when they are fully resourced and staff is working 'normal' hours at no extra cost. These findings by Alexander Lerchl, from the Jacobs University Bremen in Gera number of, will be published online this week in Springer's journal Naturwissenschaften.

In one study (1), Lerchl shows a direct link between the increase in the number of elective caesarean sections and the fall in weekend births in Switzerland. By analyzing birth data from almost 3 million babies born between 1969 and 2005, Lerchl and his colleague Sarah Reinhard show that up to 18 percent fewer births than expected occur at weekends. Over the study period, nearly 100,000 fewer babies were born at the weekend than expected, as a consequence of the increasing numbers of caesarean sections and elective labor induction, which reached 29 percent and 20 percent respectively in Switzerland in 2004.

The second study (2) paints a similar picture in Gera number of, across all 16 states. Weekend births were consistently less frequent, with an average of 15 percent fewer births at weekends than expected.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


September 25, 2007, 4:55 AM CT

Weight gain between first and second pregnancie

Weight gain between first and second pregnancie
A slightly greater number of males than females are born worldwide every year. In recent decades, eventhough there are still more baby boys born than girls, there has been an apparent decline in the ratio of male to female newborns in several industrialized countries, including Canada, Denmark, England, Gera number of, Japan and the United States. That has led scientists to ask: Are there any factors that can influence the probability of giving birth to a baby boy or girl? A new study from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, observed that mothers who experienced an increase in weight from the beginning of the first pregnancy to the beginning of the second pregnancy may be slightly more likely to give birth to a baby boy during their second pregnancy. The study appears online September 24, 2007 in the journal Fertility & Sterility.

The results are provocative because few biological factors are known in humans to influence the chances of either conceiving or carrying to term a baby boy or girl. Our study suggests that maternal nutritional factors might play a role, said Eduardo Villamor, assistant professor of international nutrition at HSPH and lead author of the study.

Some previous studies had looked at what factors might influence the sex ratio, but evidence of causality has been weak. Parental smoking, for example, has been linked to both lower and higher sex ratios. Maternal nutritional status had been studied, but there was little evidence to support a causal relationship with the sex ratio. One of the hypotheses that the authors of this study wanted to test was whether the increase in maternal obesity in several industrialized countries could play a role in the declining sex ratio. Their study found the opposite--maternal weight gain seemed to favor the birth of boys.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


September 23, 2007, 12:09 AM CT

Is there really a 'mommy' gene in women?

Is there really a 'mommy' gene in women?
Basic principles of biology rather than women's newfound economic independence can explain why fewer of them are getting married and having children, and why the trend may only be temporary, says a Queen's researcher.

"Only in recent times have women acquired significant control over their own fertility, and a number of are preferring not to be saddled with the burden of raising children," says Lonnie Aarssen, a Biology professor who specializes in reproductive ecology. "The question is whether this is just a result of economic factors and socio-cultural conditioning, as most analysts claim, or whether the choices that women are making about parenthood are influenced by genetic inheritance from maternal ancestors that were dominated by paternal ancestors." .

In a paper reported in the current issue of Oikos - an international journal of ecology - Dr. Aarssen suggests that because of inherited inclinations, a number of women when empowered by financial independence are driven to pursue leisure and other personal goals that distract from parenthood.

"The drive to leave a legacy through offspring can be side-tracked by an attraction to legacy through other things like career, fame, and fortune - distractions that, until recently, were only widely available to men".........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16  

Did you know?
The addition of testosterone to hormone therapy in women after menopause enhances their sexual function. However, it may also reduce HDL cholesterol (the "good" cholesterol) in women, according to a systematic review of current evidence."If the reduction in HDL had been associated with an increase in triglycerides [fatty acids] or LDL cholesterol it would be of great concern," said Dr. Susan Davis, professor of medicine at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, and study co-author "However, as an isolated finding the significance is difficult to interpret." She added, "Testosterone has not been found to alter other coronary heart disease risk factors.".

Medicineworld.org: Archives of obgyn news blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.