MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of obgyn news blog


Go Back to the main obgyn news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Obgyn News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


January 21, 2008, 8:37 PM CT

Pharmaceutical market fails pregnant women

Pharmaceutical market fails pregnant women
The existing research and development and business model of the pharmaceutical industry is failing pregnant women, according a policy paper published this week in PLoS Medicine. In their analysis of an industry database that tracks drugs under development since 1981, Imperial College Londons Nick Fisk (Professor of Fetal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine) and Rifat, Atun (Professor of International Health Management, Tanaka Business School) show that pregnancy has become a virtual pharma-free zone with only seventeen drugs under active development for maternal health indications and only one new class of drug licensed in the last 20 years.

For their analysis, the authors searched the Pharmaprojects database, which lists all drugs identified as being under development from pharmaceutical company web sites, conferences, PubMed (a searchable database of the abstracts of published medical journal articles) and registered clinical trials. Over 37,000 drugs under development have been listed since 1981. They searched for drugs for obstetric applications and, in order to compare industry activity in maternal health relative to other areas of medicine, they also examined the database for drugs for cardiovascular indications and for a rare condition called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - a neurodegenerative disease sometimes called Lou Gehrigs disease.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


January 7, 2008, 10:56 PM CT

Infants with Birthmarks Received Less Oxygen

Infants with Birthmarks Received Less Oxygen
A hemangioma is a non-malignant tumor of cells that line blood vessels, appearing during the first few weeks of life as a large birthmark or lesion. A study published in Pediatric Dermatology reveals that a disturbance of oxygen depletion was found in placentas of babies who developed infantile hemangioma (IH).

Scientists evaluated placental samples from 26 pregnancies with babies who weighed less than 3.5 pounds, 13 consisting of newborns who developed IH after birth and 13 healthy preterm infants who did not have IH.

Only one of the infants without IH showed an abnormal placenta. The higher ratio of placental anomalies in babies with IH suggests that reduced oxygen to the placenta contributed to fetal stress, and that stress led to infantile hemangioma development.

"Our results suggest that disturbed placental circulation is a factor underlying the development of hemangiomas in very low weight newborns and indicates that placental examination is essential for clarifying the physiologic changes leading to IH in babies with normal birth weight," the authors conclude.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


January 3, 2008, 10:03 PM CT

Exercise Reduces Menopausal Anxiety

Exercise Reduces Menopausal Anxiety
With more menopausal women seeking natural therapies to ease symptoms, a new study has observed that simply adding a brisk walking routine can reduce a variety of psychological symptoms such as anxiety, stress and depression. The research is reported in the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

"With the aging population, physical activity represents one way for women to stay mentally healthy. Physical activity can help throughout the menopausal transition and afterwards," said Temple University public health researcher Deborah Nelson, Ph.D, the study's lead author.

From 1996 to 1997, 380 women living in Philadelphia were recruited and they have been followed for more than eight years. The women reported their physical activity level and menopausal symptoms including stress, anxiety, depression and hot flashes.

The average age at the beginning of the study was 42 -years -old; 49 percent were African American, 58 percent reported more than a high school education, and 38 percent smoked cigarettes.

"We recruited African-American and Caucasian women living in Philadelphia for this study to better represent the large population of urban women. These results can be generalizable to both urban Caucasian and African-American women, groups of women that have been under-represented in prior studies," Nelson said.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


January 3, 2008, 9:03 PM CT

Mom's obesity during conception

Mom's obesity during conception
The number of overweight and obese Americans continues to grow rapidly. Today, 50 percent of adults are overweight and up to 20 percent are obese. While the number of overweight/obese children is at an all time high, the steady increase of overweight infants -- individuals under 11 months old -- is alarming.

Research studies have observed that pregnant women who are overweight/obese are more likely to give birth to heavier babies, and the risk of overweight children becoming obese adults is nearly nine times greater than for children who are not overweight. Studies also show that greater body-weight at birth and weight gain early in life increases the risk of becoming overweight or obese as an adult. Inheritance studies show that a child's body mass index (BMI) correlates more closely with the mother's BMI than with it's father's, suggesting that an interaction of both genetic and intrauterine influences, may contribute to later-life obesity risk in the offspring.

Armed with these and other data, a team of scientists from the USDA-Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center has examined whether the subtle effects of fetal exposure to the mother's obesity can have a latent effect on the offspring. In a new report, researchers studied whether fetal exposure to gestational obesity leads to a self-reinforcing viscious cycle of excessive weight gain and body fat which passes from mother to child. The results of the new study suggest they do.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


December 20, 2007, 5:32 AM CT

Premenstrual symptoms getting on your nerves?

Premenstrual symptoms getting on your nerves?
For some women premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a minor monthly annoyance, but for others, more severe symptoms seriously disrupt their lives. However despite the number of women affected, science has yet to offer a full explanation or universal therapy. Now intriguing new findings reported in the online open access journal BioPsychoSocial Medicine suggest not only that PMS is tied to decreased nerve activity each month, but also that those with extreme symptoms may have a permanently depressed nervous system.

A team of Japanese scientists led by Tamaki Matsumoto from the International Buddhist University in Osaka investigated whether the activity of the autonomic nervous system, which plays a vital role in equilibrium within the human body, changed during the menstrual cycle. The team measured heart rate variability and hormone levels and used questionnaires to evaluate physical, emotional and behavioural symptoms accompanying 62 womens menstrual cycles.

For the parameters Matsumotos team was testing, the control group with little or no menstrual symptoms did not vary during the month. However women suffering from PMS saw results reflecting autonomic and parasympathetic nerve activity decrease significantly in the late luteal phase, which precedes menstruation. Those with the most marked symptoms (known as premenstrual dysphoric disorder) had lower rates of nerve activity than the other groups during the entire menstrual cycle.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


December 18, 2007, 9:58 PM CT

More Accurate Radiation Therapy for Expecting Mothers

More Accurate Radiation Therapy for Expecting Mothers
Instead of employing the conventional constructive solid geometry (CSG) tools to construct the computer model, Xu and his team turned to boundary representations (BREP) tools.
Photo Credit: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Developing fetuses are extremely sensitive to radiation, which poses an impossible dilemma for expecting mothers in need of screening or therapy for cancer. Now scientists from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a new set of modeling tools that could enable safer, more accurate, and more effective radiation treatment and nuclear medicine imaging procedures for pregnant women.

Radiation is a doubled-edged sword: It holds the power to cure cancer, but if used improperly it can also cause serious damage to the human body. The situation is even more critical with pregnant females, as any errant radiation could severely harm and impede the growth of the fetus.

"The human body is a particular challenge to model because of its wide variety of organs, each with a complex and unique shape," said X. George Xu, professor of nuclear and biomedical engineering at Rensselaer, who is leading the project. "Pregnant females are even more difficult to model using current methods, so we took an completely new approach".

Physicians use advanced computer simulations to determine the correct dose of radiation to administer to patients. These computer simulations are based on sophisticated virtual models of the human body. About 30 of these models, sometimes called "phantoms," have been developed worldwide.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


December 13, 2007, 8:58 PM CT

Adapting to pregnancy in human evolution

Adapting to pregnancy in human evolution
The human spine evolved differently in males and females in order to alleviate back pressure from the weight of carrying a baby, as per research spearheaded at The University of Texas at Austin.

The lumbar differences are documented for the first time in the Dec. 13 issue of Nature.

The scientists believe the adaptation first appeared at least two million years ago, in the early human ancestor Australopithecus. The male-female difference does not appear in chimpanzees, meaning the evolution to walking upright led to the adaptation.

"Natural selection favored this adaptation because it reduces extra stress on a pregnant female's spine," said University of Texas at Austin anthropologist Liza Shapiro, who conducted the research with graduate student Katherine K. Whitcome, now a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University. "Without the adaptation, pregnancy would have placed a heavier burden on back muscles, causing considerable pain and fatigue and possibly limiting foraging capacity and the ability to escape from predators."

Harvard anthropologist Daniel Lieberman also contributed to the study, which shows the key differences between males and females appear in the lower back, or lumbar portion of the spine.

Human spines have a unique forward curve in the lumbar region, but the curve extends across more vertebrae in females. That helps offset harmful forces that might occur on the spine when pregnant women lean back or hyperextend their spines to balance the weight of the fetus, Shapiro said. The joints between the vertebrae also are larger in females and angled differently than in males to better support the extra weight.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


December 12, 2007, 9:52 PM CT

Link between women's hormones and mood disorders

Link between women's hormones and mood disorders
Countless movies and TV shows make light of womens so-called moodiness, often jokingly attributing it to their menstrual cycle or, on the other hand, to menopause. In fact, mood disorders are a serious and pervasive health problem, and large-scale population studies have observed women are 1.5 to 3 times more likely to suffer from major depressive disorder than are men.

In a newly published study, womens health experts from the University of Alberta argue there is an urgent need for carefully designed, gender-specific research to better understand the relationship of female sex hormones to mood states and disorders.

The reasons for the gender disparity in rates of depression are not completely understood, says Kathy Hegadoren, the Canada Research Chair in Stress Disorders in Women at the University of Alberta.

But there is growing evidence that estrogens have powerful effects beyond their role in reproductionthat they play a critical role in mood disorders in womenand this opens new avenues for research into the underlying biological mechanisms and therapy of depression.

Estrogen can be used to treat various mood disturbances in womensuch according toimenopausal, postmenopausal and postpartum depressionbut the results of these therapys can be difficult to interpret because scientists are only beginning to recognize the complex interactions among estrogens, serotonin and mood.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


December 11, 2007, 10:38 PM CT

Obesity reduces chances of spontaneous pregnancy

Obesity reduces chances of spontaneous pregnancy
A new study of obesity and the probability of pregnancy has shown that a womans chances of a spontaneous pregnancy steadily decrease the fatter she is.

In the first prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and pregnancy chances in women who have no obvious reasons for infertility but who have spent a year or more trying unsuccessfully to conceive, the study observed that for every BMI unit above 29 kg/m2, the probability of pregnancy was reduced by four per cent in comparison to women with a BMI between 21-29 kg/m2. Very obese women (BMI 35-40) had a probability of pregnancy that was between 26 and 43 per cent lower than women with a BMI between 21-29.

Dr Jan Willem van der Steeg, the lead author of the study [1], which is published in Europes leading reproductive medicine journal, Human Reproduction, today (Wednesday 12 December) said: This reduction in fertility is comparable to the increment of one year in female age. This study tells us that not only obese women with anovulation have lower chances of conception, but also obese women with a regular cycle. Given the increased prevalence of obesity, this is a worrying finding. The occurence rate of obesity is reckoned to be 12 per cent in women of child-bearing age in Western Europe and 25 per cent in North America.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


December 6, 2007, 2:55 PM CT

Miscarriage Myths Persist

Miscarriage Myths Persist
Jonathon Schaffir
More than a third of women surveyed about their beliefs surrounding miscarriage and birth defects said they thought that a pregnant woman's foul mood could negatively affect her baby.

One in four of these women thought a pregnant woman's exposure to upsetting situations could hurt her unborn child, and one in five believed excessive exercise could cause a woman to miscarry.

Despite those beliefs, relatively few of the women surveyed blamed mothers for a poor pregnancy outcome. Ten percent suggested pregnant women are responsible for their miscarriages, and 3 percent said mothers should be blamed for their babies' birth defects. Women with less formal education were more likely to hold mothers responsible for bad pregnancy outcomes.

The recent Ohio State University study points to the persistence of folklore surrounding pregnancy despite advances in medical interventions and evidence that most miscarriages and defects result from circumstances beyond a woman's control, said study author Jonathan Schaffir, a clinical assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Ohio State.

"The survey shows that a sizable proportion of the population believes maternal thoughts and actions contribute to adverse fetal outcomes - but despite these feelings, few assign responsibility to the mother," Schaffir said. "I think it's kind of amazing that people out there still believe that a pregnant woman seeing something frightening could cause her baby to have a birthmark. That was an 18th-century belief and it's still circulating, even today.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18  

Did you know?
The addition of testosterone to hormone therapy in women after menopause enhances their sexual function. However, it may also reduce HDL cholesterol (the "good" cholesterol) in women, according to a systematic review of current evidence."If the reduction in HDL had been associated with an increase in triglycerides [fatty acids] or LDL cholesterol it would be of great concern," said Dr. Susan Davis, professor of medicine at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, and study co-author "However, as an isolated finding the significance is difficult to interpret." She added, "Testosterone has not been found to alter other coronary heart disease risk factors.".

Medicineworld.org: Archives of obgyn news blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.