MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of society medical news blog


Go Back to the main society medical news blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Society Medical News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


December 18, 2007, 9:24 PM CT

Health care in American prisons

Health care in American prisons
That question is addressed in a special issue of Journal of Correctional Health Care (JCHC), opening up correctional system health care issues to outside evaluation and input. In key articles and commentaries, all written by eminent experts and pioneers in the field, JCHC explores the history of prison health care, from when the only option was for inmates to provide basic first aid for each other, to the current realities of clinics and individualized care behind bars. It also takes a close look at follow-up care after an inmate is released and the prospects for the future of correctional health care.

Change has not been without its problems, writes John R. Miles, MPA, JCHC editor, but the conditions experienced by inmates in the past are not tolerated today. The standard of decency continues to evolve. We must continue in our quest to ensure that inmates and all citizens of our nation have access to good quality and affordable care. The public health and safety of our nation is everyones concern.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


December 17, 2007, 10:32 PM CT

How Doctors Deal With The Risks

How Doctors Deal With The Risks
Risk is an inherent element of the hospital system and the resulting dangers are often normalised by medical staff to allow them to do their job, as per research by a University of Nottingham academic.

Dr Justin Waring, Lecturer in Medical Sociology and Health Policy at the University, observed that medical staff were inevitably pessimistic about the ability of their management team to understand the level of risk that doctors and nurses dealt with on a day-to-day basis. They felt that management were too far removed from the realities of clinical safety to judge best practice and that the priorities and targets that drive risk management - such as cost savings and cutting waiting times - diverged from those of the clinicians.

Dr Waring identified the operating theatre as a complex 'hub' within the hospital system, which had a symbiotic relationship with other departments - including surgical wards, the anaesthetic department, sterile services and lab and imaging services. Problems in the operating theatre were found to 'spill over' into related departments, creating 'cascade chains' of risk, which clinicians in all areas then had to deal with.

As a result, medical staff develop ritualistic behaviours that are based on shared cultural norms and expectations - just to get the job done. They tolerate and endure levels of risk and sub-standard working; accommodate or accept the presence of risk by making small modifications to clinical practice; and innovate, developing new procedures to work around risk. This emphasis on coping has come to be seen as a mark of professionalism among medical staff.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


December 17, 2007, 10:17 PM CT

Protecting aging Americans against infectious disease

Protecting aging Americans against infectious disease
Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University have uncovered new information about the bodys immune system in a study that suggests new strategies may be in order for protecting the countrys aging population against disease. The research is reported in the current edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

The research focused on an important component of the bodys immune system, a certain type of white blood cell called nave T-cells. These cells are called naive because they have no experience of encountering germs. However, once they encounter germs, they learn and adapt to become strong defenders of the organism. The cells play an important role in the vaccination process because vaccines, which contain either weakened or dead viruses, teach nave T-cells how to recognize germs and prepare the body for fighting infectious diseases at a later date. Prior research shows that an individuals supply of nave T-cells diminishes over their lifetime, meaning that in old age a person is more susceptible to infections such as the flu.

Our research identified one actual process by which nave T-cells are lost during the later part of life, explained Janko Nikolich-Zugich, Ph.D., a senior scientist at the OHSU Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute and the Oregon National Primate Research Center and a professor of molecular microbiology and immunology in the OHSU School of Medicine.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


December 13, 2007, 9:08 PM CT

Overweight People Are More Likely to Have Bad Breath

Overweight People Are More Likely to Have Bad Breath
Now there's another good reason to go on that diet after the holidays. Tel Aviv University scientists have published a study that finds a direct link between obesity and bad breath: the more overweight you are, the more likely your breath will smell unpleasant to those around you.

The research, led by breath expert Prof. Mel Rosenberg from the Department of Human Microbiology and The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University, was published in the Journal of Dental Research in October. The study also reported, for the first time, scientific evidence that links bad breath to alcohol consumption.

"The finding on alcohol and bad breath was not surprising because the anecdotal evidence was already there," says Prof. Rosenberg. "However, the finding that correlated obesity to bad breath was unanticipated".

A Weighty Sample

The study was done in Israel and included a sample of 88 adults of varying weights and heights. While at a clinic for a regular check-up, they were asked by graduate student Tsachi Knaan, a co-author in the study, whether he could test the odor of their breath and ask questions about their daily habits.

Prof. Rosenberg, Knaan and Prof. Danny Cohen concluded from the data that overweight patients were more likely to have foul-smelling breath. "This finding should hold for the general public," says Prof. Rosenberg. "But we don't have any scientific evidence as to why this is the case. That will be the next step".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


December 13, 2007, 8:59 PM CT

Adapting to pregnancy in human evolution

Adapting to pregnancy in human evolution
The human spine evolved differently in males and females in order to alleviate back pressure from the weight of carrying a baby, as per research spearheaded at The University of Texas at Austin.

The lumbar differences are documented for the first time in the Dec. 13 issue of Nature.

The scientists believe the adaptation first appeared at least two million years ago, in the early human ancestor Australopithecus. The male-female difference does not appear in chimpanzees, meaning the evolution to walking upright led to the adaptation.

"Natural selection favored this adaptation because it reduces extra stress on a pregnant female's spine," said University of Texas at Austin anthropologist Liza Shapiro, who conducted the research with graduate student Katherine K. Whitcome, now a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University. "Without the adaptation, pregnancy would have placed a heavier burden on back muscles, causing considerable pain and fatigue and possibly limiting foraging capacity and the ability to escape from predators."

Harvard anthropologist Daniel Lieberman also contributed to the study, which shows the key differences between males and females appear in the lower back, or lumbar portion of the spine.

Human spines have a unique forward curve in the lumbar region, but the curve extends across more vertebrae in females. That helps offset harmful forces that might occur on the spine when pregnant women lean back or hyperextend their spines to balance the weight of the fetus, Shapiro said. The joints between the vertebrae also are larger in females and angled differently than in males to better support the extra weight.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


December 12, 2007, 10:09 PM CT

Greater agreement on the attractiveness of faces

Greater agreement on the attractiveness of faces
A new study from scientists at Harvard University shows that friends, siblings and spouses are more likely than strangers to agree on the attractiveness of faces. Recent research regarding facial attractiveness has emphasized the universality of attractiveness preferences, and in this study there was some agreement among the strangers - but the close relations were in even greater agreement regarding facial attractiveness.

The study appears in the current issue of the journal Perception, and was led by Richard Russell, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Psychology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, and Matthew Bronstad a postdoctoral researcher at the Schepens Eye Research Institute, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School. The work was done while Bronstad was with Brandeis University.

While there are some universal standards of beauty, this study shows that perception and standards of attractiveness are more likely to be shared among individuals who know each other well, says Russell.

In the study, 113 participants were asked to rate 74 faces on a scale from one to seven, from very attractive to very unattractive. Among the participants were 20 pairs of spouses, 20 pairs of siblings and 41 pairs of close friends. Each of the pairs completed the test separately, so that they could not influence each others ratings. The participants ranged widely in age, but were of a similar background, and were all North American and caucasian. The faces rated were all young and caucasian.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


December 12, 2007, 9:52 PM CT

Link between women's hormones and mood disorders

Link between women's hormones and mood disorders
Countless movies and TV shows make light of womens so-called moodiness, often jokingly attributing it to their menstrual cycle or, on the other hand, to menopause. In fact, mood disorders are a serious and pervasive health problem, and large-scale population studies have observed women are 1.5 to 3 times more likely to suffer from major depressive disorder than are men.

In a newly published study, womens health experts from the University of Alberta argue there is an urgent need for carefully designed, gender-specific research to better understand the relationship of female sex hormones to mood states and disorders.

The reasons for the gender disparity in rates of depression are not completely understood, says Kathy Hegadoren, the Canada Research Chair in Stress Disorders in Women at the University of Alberta.

But there is growing evidence that estrogens have powerful effects beyond their role in reproductionthat they play a critical role in mood disorders in womenand this opens new avenues for research into the underlying biological mechanisms and therapy of depression.

Estrogen can be used to treat various mood disturbances in womensuch according toimenopausal, postmenopausal and postpartum depressionbut the results of these therapys can be difficult to interpret because scientists are only beginning to recognize the complex interactions among estrogens, serotonin and mood.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


December 11, 2007, 10:39 PM CT

The bear necessities of aging

The bear necessities of aging
As per George Bernard Shaw: We dont stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing, but how fast does that aging occur once started" In the case of populations of salmon in Alaska studied by Stephanie Carlson and his colleagues at the University of Washington and McGill University and reported on in this weeks PLoS ONE, it all depends on how choosy are the bears which feed on them.

Pacific salmon are noted for not feeding during their breeding period, relying instead on stored energy reserves and for their rapid senescence the physiological deterioration linked to aging once breeding is over. It is, thus, more beneficial for bears to consume fish with fewer signs of senescence because these fish have more energy reserves. However, these fresh fish are also more vigorous and harder to catch and so are more effectively caught in smaller, shallower streams.

Carlson and his colleagues studied populations of salmon and brown bears in six creeks in southwest Alaska to determine whether the rate of senescence in salmon was driven primarily by the rate of predation by bears or by the tendency of the bears to prey on salmon with less evidence of senescence. They measured the reproductive lifespan of each fish as the number of days between stream entry and death and recorded the mode of death for each fish. They observed that the selectivity of the bears for salmon of various senescent conditions was the prime factor determining the rate of senescence in the salmon.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


December 11, 2007, 10:38 PM CT

Obesity reduces chances of spontaneous pregnancy

Obesity reduces chances of spontaneous pregnancy
A new study of obesity and the probability of pregnancy has shown that a womans chances of a spontaneous pregnancy steadily decrease the fatter she is.

In the first prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and pregnancy chances in women who have no obvious reasons for infertility but who have spent a year or more trying unsuccessfully to conceive, the study observed that for every BMI unit above 29 kg/m2, the probability of pregnancy was reduced by four per cent in comparison to women with a BMI between 21-29 kg/m2. Very obese women (BMI 35-40) had a probability of pregnancy that was between 26 and 43 per cent lower than women with a BMI between 21-29.

Dr Jan Willem van der Steeg, the lead author of the study [1], which is published in Europes leading reproductive medicine journal, Human Reproduction, today (Wednesday 12 December) said: This reduction in fertility is comparable to the increment of one year in female age. This study tells us that not only obese women with anovulation have lower chances of conception, but also obese women with a regular cycle. Given the increased prevalence of obesity, this is a worrying finding. The occurence rate of obesity is reckoned to be 12 per cent in women of child-bearing age in Western Europe and 25 per cent in North America.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


December 11, 2007, 10:11 PM CT

Microbial risks in the water we drink

Microbial risks in the water we drink
It is a familiar scenario experienced around the world: an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness suddenly emerges in a community, and no one knows where it came from or how to stop it. At the start of the outbreak, only a few people are affected, most often the very old and the very young. As the outbreak worsens, more and more people fall ill, and people who were weak or unwell may develop life-threatening complications.

Such outbreaks sometimes originate from a source that most people in the United States and other developed countries trust unquestioningly: drinking water. However, there is much we do not know about the causes and likelihood of waterborne illness, and we can and should do more to assess the risks, as per a new report, Clean Water: What is Acceptable Microbial Risk", released by the American Academy of Microbiology.

In the developing world, where diarrheal illnesses claim roughly 2 million lives each year, access to clean water is a serious public health challenge, says Mark LeChevallier of American Water Works Service Company in Vorhees, New Jersey, one of the authors of the report. Fortunately, the United States and other developed countries have managed to rein in the biggest waterborne disease problems, but water quality is still a very real concern. Sporadic illnesses and outbreaks still occur, and they can have a serious impact on public health and commerce.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   107  

Did you know?
Adolescents who suffer physical injuries are vulnerable to emotional distress in the months following their hospitalization, yet almost 40 percent of hospitalized adolescents interviewed for a new study had no source for the follow-up medical care that could diagnose and treat symptoms of post-traumatic stress. These young trauma survivors are at risk for high levels of post-traumatic stress and depressive symptoms, as well as high levels of alcohol use, according to research by researchers at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center.

Medicineworld.org: Archives of society medical news blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.