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December 5, 2006, 9:16 PM CT

how caring sentiments can affect business sense

how caring sentiments can affect business sense
Imagine you are selling a used car on eBay. You will demand a higher price for the car if your toddler is sitting on your lap, says surprising new research from the recent issue of the Journal of Consumer Research. Scientists from the University of Toronto observed that simply thinking about a personal relationship causes sellers to set a higher price, even if the relationship is not directly correlation to the transaction.

"Relationships are like the lenses that guide our view, not just in that particular relationship or with the relationship partner, but in other unrelated circumstances as well," says Pankaj Aggarwal, who authored the piece with doctoral student Meng Zhang.

The study is the first to examine how relationships affect our feelings of loss aversion. When selling an item we own, we tend to demand a price that is higher than what we are willing to pay for it. Personal interactions cause us to feel like parting with the item would be more of a loss by evoking sentiments about how the value of an item is more than just monetary and thus leading to a higher asking price.

"This research has some important implications, not just for marketing managers, but also for consumers," write the authors.

They explain, "The next time you are negotiating with a person when buying a used car, it might be worthwhile not to call him at home calling him at work may get you a better price!".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Permalink         Source


December 5, 2006, 7:41 PM CT

Perception Of Overweight And Obesity

Perception Of Overweight And Obesity
Overweight black Americans are two to three times more likely than heavy white Americans to say they are of average weight even after being diagnosed as overweight or obese by their doctors, as per a research studyled by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers.

Weight "misperception" was most common among black men and women, and also was found among Hispanic men (but not women) in comparison to their white counterparts. The findings, which appear in the current online issue of the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, are significant as excess body weight is a known risk factor for diabetes, heart disease, a number of forms of cancer, and premature death.

Growing concern over the national obesity epidemic in recent years apparently has not significantly increased overweight blacks recognition of their excess pounds, said Gary G. Bennett, PhD, of Dana-Farbers Center for Community-Based Research and Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, lead author of the study.

The report by Bennett and Kathleen Y. Wolin, ScD of Northwestern University is based on an analysis of data collected in the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES), a government-sponsored research study begun in the 1960s. It includes both interviews and physical examinations carried out by mobile units across the country.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Permalink         Source


December 5, 2006, 4:53 AM CT

chlorpyrifos exposure in pregnancy

chlorpyrifos exposure in pregnancy
Children who were exposed prenatally to the insecticide chlorpyrifos had significantly poorer mental and motor development by three years of age and increased risk for behavior problems, as per a peer-evaluated study published recently by the American Academy of Pediatrics in its journal, Pediatrics. Chlorpyrifos, which was banned for residential use in 2001, is still widely applied to agricultural crops in the U.S. and abroad, including a number of fruits and vegetables.

The study assessed development of approximately 250 inner-city children from New York City who were born between 1998 and 2002. By age three, the children with the highest levels of chlorpyrifos at birth (upper 20th percentile) had significantly worse mental development and poorer motor skills than children with lower exposure levels. The more highly exposed children were also more likely by age three to exhibit early indications of behavior and attention problems. The study was co-authored by scientists from the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"These findings indicate that prenatal exposure to the insecticide chlorpyrifos not only increases the likelihood of developmental delay, but may have long-term consequences for social adjustment and academic achievement" said lead author and investigator on the study, Virginia Rauh, ScD. "Relatively speaking, the insecticide effects reported here are comparable to what has been seen with exposures to other neurotoxicants such as lead and tobacco smoke".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Permalink         Source


December 3, 2006, 9:13 PM CT

Gene Therapy For Erectile Dysfunction

Gene Therapy For Erectile Dysfunction
The first human trial of gene transfer treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) indicates that gene treatment that lasts for months and eliminates the patient's need for on-demand drugs (such as Viagra and Cialis), could become the future therapy of choice for this common problem, as per a paper in the most recent issue of Human Gene Therapy.

Lead author Arnold Melman, M.D., professor and chair of the Department of Urology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center, says, "This is an exciting field of research because current therapys for men with erectile dysfunction, whether pills or minimally invasive therapies, must be used 'on demand', thereby reducing the spontaneity of the sexual act." .

Erectile dysfunction affects more than 50 percent of men aged 40 to70 and 70 percent above age 70, as per the Massachusetts Male Aging Study.

Dr. Melman and two study centers worked with 11 men and administered various doses of a transfer gene called hMaxi-K. "While this phase 1 safety trial was not designed to provide efficacy answers, one patient in each of the higher dose groups (5000 and 7500 micrograms) reported clinically significant and sustained improvements in ED. And, there have been no adverse effects with the patients in the study, so it has been proven to be safe," he adds.........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink         Source


December 3, 2006, 9:08 PM CT

Treating obesity vital for public health

Treating obesity vital for public health
Physicians who once treated mainly elderly patients for health problems such as diabetes, heart disease and stroke are seeing increasingly younger patients who have the same ailments.

A review in the recent issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings focuses on the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a state characterized by cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, hypertension and abnormal levels of glucose (sugar) and fats in the blood. Authors Lewis Johnson, M.D., and Ruth Weinstock, M.D., Ph.D., of SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, N.Y., say physicians and public institutions must work in tandem to curb the obesity epidemic.

"Unfortunately, as the population becomes less active and more obese, we're seeing a rise in this constellation of risk factors for cardiovascular disease," says Dr. Weinstock, chief of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at the university. "That's of great concern because of the increased risk for heart attack, stroke and diabetes, and we're seeing this occur in younger and younger individuals".

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability among adults in the United States. The number of U.S. adults who are overweight or obese increased from 47 percent of the adult population in 19761980 to 65 percent in 19992002.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Permalink         Source


December 3, 2006, 8:32 PM CT

Parenting a child with an eating disorder

Parenting a child with an eating disorder
Parenting a child with an eating disorder - monitoring meals, friends and activities - can be a full-time job. But two new studies from scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital indicate a need for increased vigilance in two key areas: Internet use among adolescents with the condition, and pre-teen weight loss in seemingly healthy children.

One study, would be reported in the recent issue of Pediatrics, is the first to confirm that pro-eating disorder Web sites may promote dangerous behaviors in adolescents with eating disorders. The second, which appears in the recent issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health, indicates that pre-teens with eating disorders tend to lose weight more quickly than adolescents with the condition and weigh comparatively less at diagnosis. Packard Children's adolescent medicine and eating disorder specialist Rebecka Peebles, MD, and Jenny Wilson, a Stanford medical student, collaborated on both studies.

"If parents wouldn't let their kids go out to dinner or talk on the phone with someone they don't know, they should ask themselves what their child might be up to on the computer," Peebles, a medical school pediatrics instructor, said of the findings in the first study. She pointed out that, unlike adults, teens make few distinctions between "real" friends and people they know only online.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Permalink         Source


December 1, 2006, 4:54 AM CT

Glucocorticoid, Skin Abnormalities And Stress

Glucocorticoid, Skin Abnormalities And Stress
Inhibiting glucocorticoid, a type of steroid, can prevent skin abnormalities induced by psychological stress, as per a new study from the recent issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. The new study also shows how psychological stress induces skin abnormalities that could initiate or worsen skin disorders such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

The study, "Glucocorticoid blockade reverses psychological stress-induced abnormalities in epidermal structure and function," was carried out by Eung-Ho Choi, Marianne Demerjian, Debra Crumrine, Barbara E. Brown, Theodora Mauro, Peter M. Elias and Kenneth R. Feingold of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco and the University of California at San Francisco. Choi is also linked to Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea. The American Physiological Society published the study.

Prior research has shown that psychological stress increases glucocorticoid production. In addition, it is well recognized that psychological stress adversely affects a number of skin disorders, including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

"In this study, we showed that the increase in glucocorticoids induced by psychological stress induces abnormalities in skin structure and function, which could exacerbate skin diseases," Feingold explained. This provides a link for understanding how psychological stress can adversely affect skin disorders. Blocking the production or action of glucocorticoids prevented the skin abnormalities induced by psychological stress.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Permalink         Source


December 1, 2006, 4:43 AM CT

Varying Weight Training Intensity In Women

Varying Weight Training Intensity In Women
Women who undertake a long-term weight training program produce more biologically active growth hormone, a finding that allows physiologists to understand why weight training improves muscle tone and optimizes metabolic function.

A study reported in the recent issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism looked at different forms of growth hormone, used different testing methods, and varied weight training regimens. The research observed that the role of growth hormone in women's muscle development may be more complicated than previously thought.

"We observed that growth hormone was responsive to moderate and heavy exercise regimens having 3-12 repetitions with varying weight loading," said the study's principal author, William J. Kraemer. "Women need to have heavy loading cycle or workout in their resistance training routines, as it helps to build muscle and bone."

The study, "Chronic resistance training in women potentiates growth hormone in vivo bioactivity: characterization of molecular mass variants," was carried out by Kraemer, Jeff S. Volek, Barry A. Spiering and Carl M. Maresh of the University of Connecticut, Storrs; Bradley C. Nindl, U.S Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass.; James O. Marx, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Lincoln A. Gotshalk, University of Hawaii at Hilo; Jill A. Bush, University of Houston, Texas; and Jill R. Welsch, Andrea M. Mastro and Wesley C. Hymer, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Penn. The The American Physiological Society published the study.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Permalink         Source


December 1, 2006, 4:36 AM CT

Treating The Bedwetters

Treating The Bedwetters
Children with a form of bedwetting that does not respond to a common medicine have more sodium and urea in their nighttime urine, possibly because of an imbalance of prostaglandin, a hormone-like substance, a new study has observed.

The finding helps physiologists understand why about 30% of children who suffer from bedwetting (nocturnal enuresis) do not respond to desmopressin, a drug that successfully treats the other 70%. The findings, made by Danish medical doctors who treat enuresis, could help lead to better therapy for these children.

The study Nocturnal polyuria in monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis refractory to desmopressin therapy, was carried out by Konstantinos Kamperis and Jens Christian Djurhuus of the University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark and Soren Rittig and Kaj Anker Jorgensen of the Aarhus University Hospital. The study appears in the recent issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology published by the American Physiological Society.

Circadian rhythm important

Urine output is controlled, in part, by our own internal daily clocks, or circadian rhythm. With the transition from day to night, our bodies reduce the amount of excreted water, electrolytes and other metabolic end products in preparation for hours of sleep. We are not born with this circadian rhythm, but it commonly develops in early childhood.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Permalink         Source


December 1, 2006, 4:18 AM CT

Preparing Food Helps Young Adults Eat Better

Preparing Food Helps Young Adults Eat Better
Young adults who often purchase their own food and prepare meals at home eat fast food less often, eat more fruits and vegetables and have better overall diet quality than those who are not involved in planning and cooking their meals, as per scientists at the University of Minnesota.

The study surveyed more than 1,500 people ages 18 to 23 about their food purchasing and preparation habits and the quality of their diets. The scientists found 31 percent of those surveyed who reported high involvement in meal preparation also consume five servings of fruits or vegetables daily, compared with three percent of those who reported very low involvement in meal preparation. Eighteen percent of the "high participation" group met guidelines for consuming servings of deep-yellow or green vegetables, compared with just 2 percent of the "very low involvement" group.

The scientists found the young adults most likely to be involved with food preparation and purchasing in association tend to be female; Asian, Hispanic or white; and eating at fast-food restaurants fewer than three times per week. Still, even among study participants who were very involved in food preparation, the study found a number of young adults do not meet recommended dietary guidelines in what they eat. "Cooking skills, money to buy food and time available for food preparation were perceived as inadequate by approximately one-fifth to more than one-third of the sample." The scientists conclude: "To improve dietary intake, interventions among young adults should teach skills for preparing quick and healthful meals".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Permalink         Source



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Did you know?
Adolescents who suffer physical injuries are vulnerable to emotional distress in the months following their hospitalization, yet almost 40 percent of hospitalized adolescents interviewed for a new study had no source for the follow-up medical care that could diagnose and treat symptoms of post-traumatic stress. These young trauma survivors are at risk for high levels of post-traumatic stress and depressive symptoms, as well as high levels of alcohol use, according to research by researchers at the Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center.

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