MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of weight watcher's blog


Go Back to the main weight watcher's blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Weight Watcher's Blog From Medicineworld.Org


November 15, 2007, 10:00 PM CT

Drug dosages often incorrect for obese patients

Drug dosages often incorrect for obese patients
As if severely overweight people didnt already have enough health concerns, experts are raising another red flag the possibility that some of their prescription medications, particularly antibiotics, may not be prescribed at the appropriate dosage and could be ineffective.

Because most adult antibiotics are produced in a one size fits all dosage and some doctors are not attuned to this issue, the societal trend towards severe obesity is resulting in more individuals who get inappropriate drug therapies for infectious disease, a new study in the journal Pharmacotherapy suggests.

The number of individuals with the highest body mass index, very obese people, is up 600 percent between 1986 and 2000, said David Bearden, a clinical associate professor in the College of Pharmacy at Oregon State University.

Very obese individuals in some cases, even those with severe infections, may be getting only half the necessary dose of a prescription drug such as an antibiotic, Bearden said. Thats a problem. It could lead not only to antibiotic failure but also an increase in antibiotic resistance, another serious issue.

The problem is somewhat less of a concern with dosages of medications that patients take for extended periods, such as blood pressure or cholesterol medications, because the results of taking those medications are more routinely monitored and dosages can be increased as necessary. Its a particular concern with antibiotics, Bearden said, because they are often used to treat severe or even life-threatening infections, and bad things can happen quickly if the drug is ineffective.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


November 7, 2007, 5:04 AM CT

Does fear of weight gain keep you away from quitting smoking?

Does fear of weight gain keep you away from quitting smoking?
Is a fear of getting fatter partly to blame for the fact that nearly one in five American women still smokes, and a number of dont try to quit".

Eventhough there are a number of possible reasons for the stubborn persistence of smoking, fear of weight gain is high on the list for a number of women, says a University of Michigan Health System researcher who has devoted much of her career to studying this issue.

Several years ago, she and her team reported that 75 percent of all women smokers say they would be unwilling to gain more than five pounds if they were to quit smoking, and nearly half said they would not tolerate any weight gain. In fact, a number of women started smoking in the first place because they thought it might help them stay slim.

Now, new U-M research findings reported in the recent issue of Addictive Behaviors show that women who smoke tend to be further from their ideal body image, and more prone to dieting and bingeing, than those who dont smoke.

Cigarettes are well known to suppress appetite and weight, says Cindy Pomerleau, Ph.D., director of the U-M Nicotine Research Laboratory. So its hardly surprising that women who have trouble managing their weight or are dissatisfied with their bodies are drawn to smoking, she says.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


November 6, 2007, 10:29 PM CT

Research Links Diet to Cognitive Decline and Dementia

Research Links Diet to Cognitive Decline and Dementia
Research has shown convincing evidence that dietary patterns practiced during adulthood are important contributors to age-related cognitive decline and dementia risk. An article published in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences highlights information on the benefits of diets high in fruit, vegetables, cereals and fish and low in saturated fats in reducing dementia risk.

Adults with diabetes are particularly sensitive to the foods they eat with respect to cognitive function. Specifically, an adult with diabetes will experience a decline in memory function after a meal, particularly if simple carbohydrate foods are consumed. While the precise physiological mechanisms underlying these dietary influences are not completely understood, the modulation of brain insulin levels likely contributes.

This deficit can be prevented through healthful food choices at meals. The findings suggest that weight maintenance reduces the risk of developing obesity-associated disorders, such as hypertension and high cholesterol, and is an important component of preserving cognitive health.

The work shows another benefit of maintaining healthful eating practices with aging - the same ones proposed by most diabetes and heart & stroke foundations. "This type of information should be able to empower the individual, knowing that he/she can be actively engaged in activities and lifestyles that should support cognitive health with aging," says Carol Greenwood, author of the study.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


November 5, 2007, 8:41 PM CT

Breaking a sweat means less pounds later

Breaking a sweat means less pounds later
Don't slack off on exercise if you want to avoid packing on the pounds as you age.

A consistently high level of physical activity from young adulthood into middle age increases the odds of maintaining a stable weight and lessens the amount of weight gained over time, as per a new analysis from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

People who reported at least 30 minutes of vigorous activity a day such as jogging, bicycling or swimming were more than twice as likely to maintain a stable Body Mass Index (BMI) over 20 years. BMI is a measure of body fat based on height and weight. But even highly active people who gained weight, gained 14 pounds less over 20 years than those with consistently low activity.

Eventhough activity is commonly recommended as a way to prevent weight gain, this is one of the first studies to examine the relationship between activity and weight by looking at patterns of exercise over a long period of time.

Scientists examined data from over 2,600 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study to determine if high activity patterns over time were linked to maintaining a stable BMI. Participants in CARDIA, who were 18 to 30 years old when the study began, have been tracked for 20 years.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


October 25, 2007, 10:19 PM CT

'Knocking Out' Cell Receptor May Help to Prevent Weight Gain

'Knocking Out' Cell Receptor May Help to Prevent Weight Gain
David Hui
University of Cincinnati (UC) pathologists have identified a new molecular target that one day may help researchers develop drugs to reduce fat transport to adipocytes (fat cells) in the body and prevent obesity and related disorders, like diabetes.

Detailed in the Oct. 18 online edition and the November 2007 print issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the findings about a specific cell receptor, known as the adipocyte LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), provide important clues about the underlying biological mechanisms that control fat transport in the body.

Using genetically altered mice, David Hui, PhD, and his team demonstrated that "knocking out" the LRP1 in fat cells has a direct impact on how a number of lipids (fats and fat-like substances) are transferred and deposited to different tissues. Hui says the experimental mice gained less weight, stored less fat, tolerated glucose better and expended more energy (due to increased muscle activity) when compared with a control group.

"This receptor is expressed in numerous tissues throughout the body-including the heart, muscles, liver and vascular wall-but its specific functions in the different tissues are still relatively unknown," says Hui, corresponding author of the study and professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at UC. "Our study has shown that this molecule directly impacts the rate of fat transport in the body, so with further study it could be a new target for drugs aimed at controlling obesity".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


October 24, 2007, 7:43 PM CT

Severely Restricted Diet Linked to Physical Fitness into Old Age

Severely Restricted Diet Linked to Physical Fitness into Old Age
Severely restricting calories leads to a longer life, researchers have proved.

New research now has demonstrated for the first time that such a diet also can maintain physical fitness into advanced age, slowing the seemingly inevitable progression to physical disability and loss of independence.

The study, using a rat model of life-time caloric restriction, showed that the diet reduces the amount of visceral fat, which expresses inflammatory factors that in humans cause chronic disease and a decline in physical performance and vitality across the lifespan.

The study appears in the recent issue of Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences.

Have we finally discovered the Fountain of Youth?.

No. But we may be getting a little closer.

"This is the first study to report that caloric restriction reduced production in visceral fat of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and enhanced performance on overall physical function assessments," said Tongjian You, Ph.D., assistant professor of exercise and nutrition sciences in the UB School of Public Health and Health Professions and principal investigator.

"In addition, rats that ate a normal diet lost a significant amount of lean muscle mass and acquired more fat, while calorie-restricted rats maintained lean muscle mass as they aged".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


October 23, 2007, 10:21 PM CT

Link between obesity and viral infections

Link between obesity and viral infections
Experts dont dispute the important role that diet and activity play in maintaining a healthy weight. But can poor eating habits and a less active lifestyle fully explain the prevalence of obesity in the United States today? That question has led some scientists to ask whether there might be other causes for this serious problem. In the recent issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researcher Richard Atkinson, M.D., asserts that there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that viruses may play a role in causing obesity in humans.

The cause of obesity is not a secret -- if you consume more calories than you burn in daily activity, you gain weight. What is interesting is that much of the obesity epidemic cannot be explained just by Americans eating more and exercising less. There are other factors at play, and viruses causing obesity may be one of them, say Dr. Atkinson.

Dr. Atkinson, director of Obetech Obesity Research Center in Richmond, Va., evaluated multiple published articles that demonstrate a correlation between viral infections and obesity. His article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings discusses five animal viruses and three human viruses that have been shown to cause obesity in laboratory studies.

As per Dr. Atkinson, several studies offer ample evidence that animals infected with certain human viruses experience excess weight gain and fat storage. When scientists infected animal subjects with a human virus known as Human Ad-36, they reported measurable increases in the infected animals body fat and the visceral fat that surrounds the organs deep within the belly. In addition, studies also demonstrated that infection with Ad-36 and the resulting weight gain could be transmitted from infected animals to uninfected animals.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


October 22, 2007, 8:33 PM CT

Exercise improves thinking

Exercise improves thinking
Just three months of daily, vigorous physical activity in overweight children improves their thinking and reduces their diabetes risk, scientists say.

Studies of about 200 overweight, inactive children ages 7-11 also showed that a regular exercise program reduces body fat and improves bone density.

"Is exercise a magic wand that turns them into lean, healthy kids? No. They are still overweight but less so, with less fat, a healthier metabolism and an improved ability to handle life," says Dr. Catherine Davis, clinical health psychology expert at the Medical College of Georgia and lead investigator.

All study participants learned about healthy nutrition and the benefits of physical activity; one-third also exercised 20 minutes after school and another third exercised for 40 minutes. Children played hard, with running games, hula hoops and jump ropes, raising their heart rates to 79 percent of maximum, which is considered vigorous.

"Aerobic exercise training showed dose-response benefits on executive function (decision-making) and possibly math achievement, in overweight children," scientists write in an abstract being presented during The Obesity Society's Annual Scientific Meeting Oct. 20-24 in New Orleans. "Regular exercise may be a simple, important method of enhancing children's cognitive and academic development. These results may persuade educators to implement vigorous physical activity curricula during a childhood obesity epidemic".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


October 10, 2007, 5:49 PM CT

Obesity boosts oesophageal cancer

Obesity boosts oesophageal cancer
Obese people are six times as likely to develop gullet (oesophageal) cancer as people of healthy weight, shows research published ahead of print in the journal Gut.

Rates of oesophageal cancer have been rising rapidly, and in some countries, they have risen faster than those of every other major cancer, say the authors.

The findings are based on a comparison of almost 800 people with oesophageal cancer and almost 1600 randomly selected people eligible to vote, who did not have the disease.

Men and those under the age of 50 were particularly vulnerable, the findings showed.

The link between acid reflux and gullet cancer is well known, and unsurprisingly, repeated symptoms of severe heartburn or gastrointestinal reflux disease (GORD) were linked to a much higher risk of the cancer.

And the more frequent the symptoms, the greater was the likelihood of having oesophageal cancer.

GORD quintupled the risk of oesophageal cancer, and a combination of obesity and acid reflux boosted the chances of having it by a factor of 16.

But people who were clinically obese had a much higher risk of oesophageal cancer than those whose weight was in the healthy range, regardless of whether they had reflux disease or not.

Those with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more were six times as likely to have the cancer as those with a BMI between 18.5 and 25.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


October 9, 2007, 8:55 PM CT

Low-Fat Dietary To Lower Risk of Ovarian Cancer

Low-Fat Dietary To Lower Risk of Ovarian Cancer
A diet low in fat could reduce the risk of ovary cancer in healthy postmenopausal women, as per new results from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Dietary Modification Trial. Scientists observed that after four years, women who decreased the amount of dietary fat they consumed were 40 percent less likely to develop ovary cancer than women who followed normal dietary patterns. As expected, no effect was found during the first four years because preventive benefits on cancer often take a number of years to develop. Ovary cancer affects about 1 in 60 U.S. women in their lifetimes and has the highest mortality of all cancers of the female reproductive system.

"Low-Fat Dietary Pattern and Invasive Cancer Incidence: Further Results from the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial," is published online October 9 by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The WHI Dietary Modification Trial was conducted in 40 clinical centers throughout the United States and is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.

The WHI Dietary Modification clinical trial followed 48,835 healthy, postmenopausal women for an average of 8.1 years to test whether a low-fat diet would reduce the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease. Nearly 20,000 women in the intervention group were counseled to decrease fat intake to 20 percent of calories and to replace calories from fat with calories from vegetables, fruits, and grains. The control group (nearly 30,000 women) received diet-related education materials only.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24  

Did you know?
Exercise can't stop the aging process, but experts at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston say that for the elderly, whether it's weight training, walking, swimming or biking, 30 minutes of exercise three to five times a week is a good prescription for aging."It's never too late to start exercising," said Dr. Robert Roush, an associate professor of medicine-geriatrics at BCM. "Being physically active and exercising regularly can help prevent or delay some diseases and disabilities as people age.".

Medicineworld.org: Archives of weight watcher's blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.