MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of weight watcher's blog


Go Back to the main weight watcher's blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Weight Watcher's Blog From Medicineworld.Org


May 17, 2007, 6:46 PM CT

Obese women are more likely to skip medical screening tests

Obese women are more likely to skip medical screening tests
Women who are severely overweight and obese are more likely than other women to skip cancer screenings. This happens despite the fact that being severely obese increases their risk of developing and dying of cancer.

Scientists from the United States analyzed data from a total of 8,300 women who were aged 40 to 74 who participated in the 2000 National Health Interview survey. The scientists observed that those women who were severely obese were up to 10 percent less likely than normal-weight women to be up-to-date on clinical breast exams, mammograms and Pap smears. The scientists note that this decreased compliance with the medical tests comes in the face of increased health risk linked to this group of women.

The study also indicated that women were severerly obese were 51 percent less likely to adhere to doctors' recommendations for mammography and 83 percent less likely to adhere to Pap recommendations. This one-sided and the study observed that doctors equally likely to recommend mammography and Pap smears to obese and non-obese women.

This study is reported in the latest issue of American Journal of.

Preventive Medicine. It was also presented at a meeting of the American Society of Preventive Oncology in March.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more


May 15, 2007, 11:10 PM CT

Obesity Increases Risk of Injury on the Job

Obesity Increases Risk of Injury on the Job
Having a body mass index (BMI) in the overweight or obese range increases the risk of traumatic workplace injury, as per scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Injury Research and Policy. Employer-sponsored weight loss and maintenance programs should be considered as part of a well-rounded workplace safety plan. The study was Advance Access published on May 7, 2007, by the American Journal of Epidemiology.

BMI is a measure of body fat based on an adult's height and weight. It is used to screen for weight categories that may lead to health problems. As per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a BMI below 18.5 is considered underweight, 18.5-24.9 is normal; 25-29.9 is overweight and over 30 is obese.

"Clearly, limited resources for workplace injury prevention and control should target the most prominent and modifiable risk factors, but we cannot neglect the fact that our study and other recently published studies support an association between BMI and the risk, distribution and prevalence of workplace injury," said Keshia M. Pollack, PhD, MPH, lead author of the study and an assistant professor in the Bloomberg School of Public Health's Department of Health Policy and Management.

The scientists used medical and injury surveillance data on hourly workers employed in eight plants of the same aluminum manufacturer to determine whether increased BMI was a risk factor for workplace injury. The plants were scattered across the United States. BMI was calculated using National Institutes of Health criteria. Employees were grouped into five categories: underweight, normal, overweight, obesity levels I and II and obesity level III.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


May 14, 2007, 10:36 PM CT

Obesity And Its Complications

Obesity And Its Complications
Due to the gastrointestinal tracts role in body weight regulation, gastroenterologists should work closely with other medical disciplines to oversee and coordinate the care of obese individuals, as per an American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute Obesity Task Force Report. The Report was published in a special 13th issue of Gastroenterology, the official journal of the AGA Institute, that focuses on the growing problems correlation to obesity and nutrition. The special issue of Gastroenterology presents a series of articles on the epidemiology of obesity, pathophysiology, associated disease and management.

An estimated 1.6 billion adults worldwide are overweight (body mass index [BMI]>25) and 400 million are obese (BMI>30), and potentially as a number of 20 million children are overweight. As obesity becomes an increasingly global problem, it is harder for government, institutions and individuals to continue to consider obesity as a problem of personal choice that can be controlled and even reversed by deciding to eat less and exercise more. The incidences of diabetes and other debilitating diseases attributable to obesity continue to rise along with the negative impact on healthcare budgets and various sectors of the economy leading to changing attitudes about the obesity epidemic.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


May 9, 2007, 11:33 PM CT

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Have Positive Effect On Muscle Mass

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Have Positive Effect On Muscle Mass
A research team led by Carole Thivierge, from Universit Lavals Institute of Nutraceutics and Functional Foods, shows that omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil have a positive effect on the metabolism of muscle proteins. This finding, published in a recent edition of the Journal of Physiology, could have significant implications in the fields of animal farming as well as human health.

In mammals, the ability to use nutrients from food and convert them into muscle proteins decreases with age. Though the exact cause of this phenomenon is still unclear, insulin resistance of aging muscle cells has been suggested as a possible answer.

Since omega-3 fatty acids are known to improve glucose metabolism in people and animals showing insulin resistance, the scientists decided to test whether omega-3s could also influence protein metabolism.

To do so, they added supplements containing either omega-3s from fish oil or a mixture of cottonseed and olive oils without omega-3s to the regular diet of steers. After five weeks, animals with the marine omega-3 diet showed increased sensitivity to insulin which, in turn, improved protein metabolism: twice the amount of amino acids was used by their bodies to synthesize proteins, particularly in muscles. So it appears that omega-3 fatty acids added to the steers diet replaced other fatty acids in muscle cells and improved their functioning.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


May 9, 2007, 11:21 PM CT

Study confirms health benefits of whole grains

Study confirms health benefits of whole grains
A diet high in whole grain foods is linked to a significantly lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, as per an analysis conducted by scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

"Consuming an average of 2.5 servings of whole grains each day is linked to a 21 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease in comparison to consuming only 0.2 servings," said Philip Mellen, M.D., lead author and an assistant professor of internal medicine. "These findings suggest that we should redouble our efforts to encourage patients to include more of these foods in their diets".

These results were published on line in Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases and will appear in a future print issue.

The findings are based on an analysis of seven studies involving more than 285,000 people. By combining the data from these seven studies, scientists were able to detect effects that may not have shown up in each individual study. The studies were conducted between 1966 and April 2006.

Mellen said the findings are consistent with earlier research, but that despite abundant evidence about the health benefits of whole grains, intake remains low. A nutrition survey conducted between 1999 and 2000 observed that only 8 percent of U.S. adults consumed three or more servings of whole grain per day and that 42 percent of adults ate no whole grains on a given day.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


April 25, 2007, 9:27 PM CT

Fixing the 'taste' of diet soda

Fixing the 'taste' of diet soda
University of Illinois scientists Soo-Yeun Lee and Shelly Schmidt are trying to solve a mystery: Why doesn't diet soda taste more like regular soda? Can a well-trained panel of "taste testers" pinpoint the exact problem? And can food researchers do anything to fix it?

"If we could make diet soda taste better, it would be a big step in fighting the obesity epidemic," said Shelly Schmidt, a U of I professor of food chemistry. "A number of people know they should cut calories, but they won't drink diet pop because they don't like the taste".

Consumers may claim they don't like diet soda because of artificial sweeteners, but Schmidt and sensory scientist Lee think people are also influenced by a subtle difference called "mouth-feel." Think body, fullness, thickness; regular soda contains high-fructose corn syrup, diet soda doesn't.

What makes these researchers think mouth-feel is the culprit? For one thing, artificial sweeteners have been greatly improved and extensively studied. "Taste profiles for artificial sweeteners now closely match the one for sucrose, which humans describe as the perfect sweetness," Lee said.

But the most compelling piece of evidence is the verdict of Lee's sensory panel--12 people trained for four weeks to use a 15-point scale in order to rate the characteristics that contribute to the mouth-feel of diet and regular soda. Lee called her panelists "highly trained instruments" because they could detect significant differences in the mouth-feel of 14 samples that the scientist's super-sensitive lab instruments identified as very, very small.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


April 25, 2007, 9:12 PM CT

Report Calls For More Dairy Foods At School

Report Calls For More Dairy Foods At School
Rosemont, Ill. April 25, 2007 Today, the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine released a report recommending nutrition standards be established for "competitive" foods in the school environment, such as a la carte cafeteria items, vending machines and school stores. The National Dairy Council (NDC) applauds the overall recommendations outlined in the report, which promote the consumption of nonfat and low-fat dairy products, fruits, vegetables and whole grains and limits the amount of saturated fat, salt, added sugars, and total calories. The report includes a specific recommendation for schools to increase the availability of low-fat and nonfat white and flavored milk and yogurt, with modest amounts of added sugars, for all grade levels, throughout the day.

"We're pleased that the report recognizes the important role dairy foods play in contributing valuable nutrients to the diet of children and adolescents," said Ann Marie Krautheim, MA, RD, senior vice president of nutrition affairs at the NDC. "Child health is a dairy industry priority and we're committed to continuing to develop healthy and great-tasting dairy foods that can be enjoyed at school, at home and on-the-go".

With child obesity rates on the rise, the new guidelines aim to improve children and adolescent's diets and health.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


April 15, 2007, 9:02 PM CT

Eating Well Is The Best Revenge

Eating Well Is The Best Revenge
We all know that eating fruits, vegetables and soy products provides essential nutrition for a healthy lifestyle, while obesity leads to the opposite. Yet proving the effect of nutrition, or obesity, on cancer is an experimental challenge and a focus for scientists. As per emerging evidence being presented at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, eating well might still be one of the more pleasurable ways to prevent cancer and promote good health.

A novel mechanism for the chemoprotection by 3,3-diindolylmethane (DIM) and genistein for breast and ovary cancer: Abstract 4217

Eating such foods as broccoli and soy are believed to offer some protection against cancer, but how this occurs is not well-understood. Now, in laboratory experiments, scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles, have discovered a biological mechanism whereby two compounds in these foods might lower the invasive and metastatic potential of breast and ovary cancer cells.

They observed that diindolylmethane (DIM), a compound resulting from digestion of cruciferous vegetables, and genistein, a major isoflavone in soy, reduce production of two proteins whose chemotactic attraction to each other is necessary for the spread of breast and ovary cancers.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


April 13, 2007, 4:54 PM CT

Childhood obesity among Quebec Cree

Childhood obesity among Quebec Cree
Childhood obesity is increasing among the general population in Canada, but the statistics are even more alarming among First Nations, Inuit and Mtis children. As per a research findings published recently in the American Journal of Public Health, University of Alberta scientists observed that up to 65 per cent of Cree preschoolers in northern Quebec communities were overweight or obese.

Dr. Noreen Willows, a community nutritionist at the University of Alberta, and her colleagues also studied obesity levels in Cree schoolchildren aged 9 to 12 living in two Cree Nations north of Montreal, Canada. The scientists measured height, body mass, waist circumference and skinfold thickness, and also assessed the childrens levels of physical activity and physical fitness. The results from one community, reported in the International Journal of Circumpolar Health, indicated of the 82 participating children, 33 per cent were overweight and 38 per cent were obese.

High waist circumferences were of particular concern, as this measure is often associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Further study is needed to identify the causes behind the high obesity rates, but in general, the elementary school students exhibited very low levels of physical fitness and physical activity. Diet is another obvious possibility to consider.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


April 1, 2007, 9:04 PM CT

Fat Cancels Effects Of Vitamin C

Fat Cancels Effects Of Vitamin C
Fats in our stomach may reduce the protective effects of antioxidants such as vitamin C. Researchers at the University of Glasgow observed that in the presence of lipid the ability of antioxidants, such as ascorbic acid (the active component of vitamin C), to protect against the generation of potential cancer-forming compounds in the stomach is less than when no lipids are present. Our results illustrate how diet can influence gastric biochemistry, says Emilie Combet, the post-doctoral researcher working on the project, who will be presenting her results at the Society of Experimental Biologys Annual Main Meeting on Monday 2nd of April.

The occurence rate of cancer of the proximal stomach has been increasing over the last 20 years for which environmental factors, such as diet, certainly play a part. Nitrite, which is present in our saliva and is derived from nitrate in our diet, is believed to be a pre-carcinogen for gastric cancer. When it is swallowed and enters the acidic environment of the stomach, nitrite spontaneously forms nitrosating species able to convert a range of targets, such as secondary amines and bile acids, into carcinogenic N-nitrosocompounds. Antioxidants such as ascorbic acid protect against the formation of these nitrosocompounds by converting the nitrosating species back into nitric oxide (NO). However, NO diffuses rapidly to lipids, where it reacts with oxygen to reform nitrosating species. The presence of lipids therefore overrides the protective effect of vitamin C against the formation of harmful compounds.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19  

Did you know?
Exercise can't stop the aging process, but experts at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston say that for the elderly, whether it's weight training, walking, swimming or biking, 30 minutes of exercise three to five times a week is a good prescription for aging."It's never too late to start exercising," said Dr. Robert Roush, an associate professor of medicine-geriatrics at BCM. "Being physically active and exercising regularly can help prevent or delay some diseases and disabilities as people age.".

Medicineworld.org: Archives of weight watcher's blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.