MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of weight watcher's blog


Go Back to the main weight watcher's blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Weight Watcher's Blog From Medicineworld.Org


October 8, 2007, 11:18 AM CT

Got calcium?

Got calcium?
Laura Peracchio, professor of marketing at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Credit: Peter Jakubowski, UWM Photo Services
Current food labeling leads to under-consumption of calcium, as per this study. Those who were taught how to translate the information consumed more. Scientists believe the same is true for other beneficial nutrients.

A woman at risk for osteoporosis is told by her doctor to get 1,200-1,500 milligrams of calcium every day. But when she looks at the Nutrition Facts panel on a carton of yogurt or a jug of milk, she finds that calcium is only listed by Percent Daily Value (%DV).

How does she convert that to milligrams?.

If shes like most of usshe cant. And neither can her doctor.

Those were among the findings of research conducted by Laura A. Peracchio, professor of marketing at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM), and Lauren Block, professor of marketing at Baruch College (CUNY). The results were so compelling that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration added information to its Web site on how to translate %DV to milligrams.



The problem


The research, which involved three separate studies and a follow-up, is discussed in The Calcium Quandary: How Consumers Use Nutrition Labels for Daily Diet, reported in the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing. Peracchio and Block observed that:.
  • In Study 1, only two of 37 respondents correctly translated the calcium information on a carton of yogurt from %DV to milligrams.
........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


October 2, 2007, 8:41 PM CT

Creatine plus exercise enhances strength

Creatine plus exercise enhances strength
Lower muscle mass and an increase in body fat are common consequences of growing older.

While exercise is a proven way to prevent the loss of muscle mass, a new study led by McMaster researcher Dr. Mark Tarnopolsky shows that taking a combination of creatine monohydrate (CrM) and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in addition to resistance exercise training provides even greater benefits.

The study would be published on Oct. 3 in PLoS One, an international, peer-evaluated online journal of the Public Library of Science, involved 19 men and 20 women who were 65 years or older and took part in a six-month program of regular resistance exercise training.

In the randomized double blind trial, some of the participants were given a daily supplement of creatine (a naturally produced compound that supplies energy to muscles) and linoleic acid (a naturally occurring fatty acid), while others were given a placebo. All participants took part in the same exercise program.

The exercise training resulted in improvements of functional ability and strength in all participants, but those taking the CrM and CLA showed even greater gains in muscle endurance, an increase in fat-free mass and a decrease in the percentage of body fat.

This data confirms that supervised resistance exercise training is safe and effective for increasing strength and function in elderly adults and that a combination of CrM and CLA can enhance some of the beneficial effects of training over a six month period, said Tarnopolsky, a professor of pediatrics and medicine.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


October 1, 2007, 8:05 PM CT

Obese moms-to-be should gain less weight

Obese moms-to-be should gain less weight
Severely obese women should lose weight during pregnancy, while obese women who are pregnant should gain less weight than currently recommended, a Saint Louis University study finds.

The research is the largest population-based study to look at the effect of weight gain during pregnancy by obese expectant mothers, says Raul Artal, M.D., study author and chairman of the department of obstetrics, gynecology and womens health at Saint Louis University School of Medicine.

This study confirms what weve suspected all along -- that obese women dont have to gain any weight during their pregnancy, Dr. Artal says.

The study, reported in the recent issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, analyzed the pregnancies of more than 120,000 obese women from Missouri to see how weight gain affected preeclampsia, which is hypertension brought on by pregnancy; cesarean delivery; and birth size.

Limiting weight gain of obese women during pregnancy has a number of benefits, the study shows. Women who have a BMI of 35 and gain fewer than the currently recommended 15 pounds are less likely to develop preeclampsia, less likely to need a cesarean delivery and more likely to have a baby of normal weight. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal weight.

Obese and overweight women should gain very little weight at all, Dr. Artal says.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


October 1, 2007, 5:29 AM CT

Best weight-loss plans for heart health

Best weight-loss plans for heart health
Image courtesy of anti-aging-medicine-rx.com
Over the past three decades, the rising obesity epidemic has been accompanied by a proliferation of weight-loss plans. However, as a new study by scientists from the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) reveals, these weight-loss plans vary significantly in their ability to positively affect heart health.

In A Dietary Quality Comparison of Popular Weight-Loss Plans, reported in the recent issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, several weight-loss plans significantly outperformed others in their ability to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Specifically, the researchers observed that the Ornish, Weight Watchers High Carbohydrate and New Glucose Revolution plans scored highest when measured by the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI). Proven to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease, the AHEI is a measure that isolates dietary components that are most strongly associated with cardiovascular disease risk reduction.

Obviously, obesity is linked to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, said UMMS Assistant Professor of Medicine Yunsheng Ma, PhD, MPH, one of the studys primary authors. Optimal weight-loss plans should facilitate both weight loss and chronic disease prevention, specifically cardiovascular risk reduction.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 26, 2007, 7:57 PM CT

New drug makes weight loss safer

New drug makes weight loss safer
Dr. Nir Barak of TAU
More than 60 percent of American women are overweight, with nearly a third falling into the category of obese and at greater risk of cancer, heart disease and diabetes. Until now, there has been no safe, long-term medical remedy that tackles unwanted weight gain.

Dr. Nir Barak of Tel Aviv Universitys Sackler School of Medicine has developed what could be a new weight-loss wonder drug. In conjunction with the drug company Obecure, Dr. Barak developed a new formulation called HistaleanTM, based on betahistine, an approved drug marketed worldwide for the therapy of vertigo. Betahistine has been available to health authorities for over 30 years.

Betahistine is believed to block receptors in the brain the H1 and H3 receptors which are connected to ones sense of fullness and desire to eat fatty foods. It has an excellent safety profile and has been used for therapy by more than 100 million patients suffering from vertigo and dizziness in Canada and Europe.

The repurposed pill, Histalean, has been found to quell the desire to consume fatty foods, and the effects have been most pronounced in women.

As per the U.S. Center for Disease Control, about 32% of adult American women under 54 (about 25 million women) suffer from obesity. Our new results suggest a strong gender-and-age-effect and support the potential of the drug as a breakthrough anti-obesity agent in women 50 years old or less, confirmed Dr. Yaffa Beck, Obecures CEO.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 25, 2007, 9:01 PM CT

Sense of taste different in women with anorexia nervosa

Sense of taste different in women with anorexia nervosa
Eventhough anorexia nervosa is categorized as an eating disorder, it is not known whether there are alterations of the portions of the brain that regulate appetite. Now, a new study finds that women with anorexia have distinct differences in the insulta the specific part of the brain that is important for recognizing taste as per a new study by University of Pittsburgh and University of California, San Diego scientists currently on line in advance of publication in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

The study also implies that there may be differences in the processing of information correlation to self-awareness in recovering anorexics in comparison to those without the illness findings that may lead to a better understanding of the cause of this serious and sometimes fatal mental disorder.

In the study led by Angela Wagner, M.D., University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and Walter H. Kaye, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Schools of Medicine, the brain activity of 32 women was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI.) The research team looked at images of the brains of 16 women who had recovered from anorexia nervosa some of whom had been treated at the Center for Overcoming Problem Eating at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and 16 control subjects. They measured their brains reactions to pleasant taste (sucrose) and neutral taste (distilled water.) The results of the fMRI study are the first evidence that individuals with anorexia process taste in a different way than those without the eating disorder.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 25, 2007, 8:41 PM CT

Children obese due to many unhealthy pressures

Children obese due to many unhealthy pressures
Unhealthy options and pressures influence nearly every part of children's daily lives, as per studies released this week in a special supplement of the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

The national studies, which include work conducted at the University of Michigan, reveal that, in most middle and high schools across the nation, contracts with soft drink bottling companies give students easy access to sugary beverages.

Low- versus high-income neighborhoods have a higher proportion of their restaurants serving fast foods and have fewer supermarkets and more convenience stores at which to buy their groceries. In the media, television advertisements steer kids to spend their money on junk food, and minority students get considerably more such exposure, the studies showed.

For the special supplement, Bridging the Gap, a national research program funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and based at U-M and the University of Illinois at Chicago, produced a groundbreaking collection of evidence on factors that contribute to the escalating rates of childhood obesity.

The studies offer new insight about how current school policies, neighborhood characteristics and advertising collectively impact the childhood obesity epidemic-and together create an overwhelmingly unhealthy environment for young people.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 18, 2007, 8:05 PM CT

Eat Smart. Play Hard

Eat Smart. Play Hard
Christina Economos, PhD, principal investigator of Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart. Play Hard, a large-scale community intervention to curb childhood obesity, will present her research at the second annual Friedman School Symposium at Tufts, October 29th to 31st in Boston.

Shape Up Somerville was a 3 year long obesity prevention intervention targeted at first through third graders in the culturally diverse Boston suburb of Somerville, Massachusetts.

Eager to turn the tide on childhood obesity, the town leaders of Somerville, community partners, and university scientists joined forces to spark community change and build an innovative, health-minded environment for the children. The Shape Up approach emphasized manageable and affordable changes in behavior and nutrition throughout the course of the day. Whats more, it worked. The intervention decreased BMI z score in children at high-risk for obesity, in comparison to the two control communities.

"There are lots of communities around the country attempting to make changes and what this study tells us is they should persevere," Economos said.

"A lot of people making a few small changes added up to produce significant results," says Dr. Economos. "We couldn't go to the kids and say you have to change your lifestyle. We had to change the environment and the community spirit first".........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


September 18, 2007, 7:49 PM CT

Eating competence may lower risk of heart disease

Eating competence may lower risk of heart disease
People who are confident, comfortable and flexible with their eating habits may be at a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease than people who are not. Scientists at Penn State suggest that a curriculum that helps people understand their eating habits could prove to be an important medical nutrition treatment.

"We wanted to see if people were at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease if they were not eating competent to begin with," said Barbara Lohse, associate professor of nutritional sciences.

Lohse and her colleagues Sheila G. West, associate professor of biobehavioral health, and Tricia L. Psota, graduate student, measured eating competence among 48 men and women aged 21 to 70, who were at risk for cardiovascular disease. Eating competence, as defined by registered dietitian and mental health professional Ellyn Satter, is a nutritional model termed ecSatter that incorporates processes such as awareness of hunger, appetite and eating enjoyment with the body's biological tendency to maintain a preferred and stable weight.

"This population was already at high risk due to high levels of LDL the bad cholesterol and elevated total cholesterol, but did not have any other type of chronic disease," said Lohse.

Based on their responses to a questionnaire on eating competence, and readings of various biological markers of cardiovascular disease, the scientists observed that participants who were not eating competent were five times more likely to have a LDL greater than the cutoff prescribed by the American Heart Association, and seven times more likely to have levels greater than that for triglyceride.........

Posted by: Daniel      Read more         Source


September 18, 2007, 7:46 PM CT

Muscle patterns in women and ACL tears

Muscle patterns in women and ACL tears
Research suggests that training programs for females to restore balance between hamstring and quadriceps muscles to better support knee joints could help reduce the disproportionately high number of ACL tears in female athletes.

A new study shows that the amount of preparatory muscle action in the muscles spanning the knee joint previous to landings is linked to knee positions that are considered at risk for ACL rupture, said Riann Palmieri-Smith, lead author and assistant professor at the University of Michigan Division of Kinesiology.

The ACL is one of the four major ligaments of the knee, and women are 2-8 times more likely to tear this ligament than men are while playing the same sport, said Palmieri-Smith.

The U-M research suggests that training programs which promote balanced activity of the inner (medial) and outer (lateral) thigh muscles might help protect the ACL.

This preparatory muscle action helps to control the relationship of the shank relative to the thigh. When the shin bone is positioned outward in comparison to the thigh bone, it results in a knock-kneed posture, Palmieri-Smith said. This position is referred to as knee valgus, and increased knee valgus (more knock kneed) has been shown to be associated with ACL injury risk, said Palmieri-Smith, who is also affiliated with U-M's new Sport Injury Prevention Center.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23  

Did you know?
Exercise can't stop the aging process, but experts at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston say that for the elderly, whether it's weight training, walking, swimming or biking, 30 minutes of exercise three to five times a week is a good prescription for aging."It's never too late to start exercising," said Dr. Robert Roush, an associate professor of medicine-geriatrics at BCM. "Being physically active and exercising regularly can help prevent or delay some diseases and disabilities as people age.".

Medicineworld.org: Archives of weight watcher's blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.