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August 8, 2007, 9:35 PM CT

Drink Milk to Gain Muscle And Lose Fat

Drink Milk to Gain Muscle And Lose Fat
Part of a research study that's ongoing into the impact of drinking milk after heavy weightlifting has observed that milk helps exercisers burn more fat.

The study by scientists at McMaster University and published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, was conducted by the Department of Kinesiologys Exercise Metabolism Research Group, lead by Stuart Phillips.

The scientists took three groups of young men 18 to 30 years of age 56 in total and put them through a rigorous, five-day-per-week weightlifting program over a 12-week period. Following their workouts, study participants drank either two cups of skim milk, a soy beverage with equivalent amounts of protein and energy, or a carbohydrate beverage with an equivalent amount of energy, which was roughly the same as drinking 600 to 700 milliliters of a typical sports drink.

Upon the studys conclusion, scientists observed that the milk drinking group had lost nearly twice as much fat - two pounds - while the carbohydrate beverage group lost one pound of fat. Those drinking soy lost no fat. At the same time, the gain in muscle was much greater among the milk drinkers than either the soy or carbohydrate beverage study participants.

The loss of fat mass, while expected, was much larger than we thought it would be, says Phillips, associate professor of kinesiology at McMaster. I think the practical implications of these results are obvious: if you want to gain muscle and lose fat as a result of working out, drink milk.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 30, 2007, 10:10 PM CT

Caffeine plus exercise to prevent skin cancer

Caffeine plus exercise to prevent skin cancer
Regular exercise and little or no caffeine has become a popular lifestyle choice for many Americans. But a new Rutgers study has found that it may not be the best formula for preventing sun-induced skin damage that could lead to cancer. Low to moderate amounts of caffeine, in fact, along with exercise can be good for your health.

According to the National Cancer Institute, sunlight-induced skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the United States with more than 1 million new cases each year. A research team at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, showed that a combination of exercise and some caffeine protected against the destructive effects of the suns ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation, known to induce skin cancer. The caffeine and exercise seemingly conspire in killing off precancerous cells whose DNA has been damaged by UVB-rays.

The studies, conducted in the Susan Lehman Cullman Laboratory for Cancer Research at Rutgers Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, appear in the July 31 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Groups of hairless mice, whose exposed skin is vulnerable to the sun, were the test subjects in experiments in which one set drank caffeinated water (the human equivalent of one or two cups of coffee a day); another voluntarily exercised on a running wheel; while a third group both drank and ran. A fourth group, which served as a control, didnt run and didnt caffeinate. All of the mice were exposed to lamps that generated UVB radiation that damaged the DNA in their skin cells.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 30, 2007, 10:08 PM CT

Bariatric surgery patients have fewer complications

Bariatric surgery patients have fewer complications
Bariatric surgery patients had 64 percent fewer complications and a 26 percent shorter hospital stay if they went to a five-star rated hospital compared with a one-star rated hospital, as per a new study released recently by HealthGrades, the healthcare ratings company. The study of bariatric surgery outcomes at hospitals in 19 states over the years 2003 to 2005 also observed that five-star rated hospitals those with better-than-average patient outcomes -- performed about twice the number of procedures compared with hospitals that rated poorly.

A clear trend away from traditional, more invasive gastric bypass to a less invasive laparoscopic procedure was also found in the study, as per the second annual HealthGrades Bariatric Surgery Trends in American Hospitals. Over 70 percent of the surgeries done in 2005 were laparoscopic, which are linked to fewer inhospital complications than traditional gastric bypass.

Bariatric surgery has been demonstrated to be highly effective for those with morbid obesity, but the relatively new procedures are still not regulated or a credentialed surgical subspecialty, said Samantha Collier, MD., HealthGrades chief medical officer. So it is important that patients considering surgery know how hospitals rate.

The HealthGrades study analyzed 166,410 bariatric surgery procedures in the years 2003, 2004 and 2005 in the 19 states that collect and release all-payer outcomes data. Those states are: Arizona, California, Florida, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


July 30, 2007, 9:50 PM CT

Obese patients get patchy weight-loss support

Obese patients get patchy weight-loss support
Only one in seven UK doctors surgeries provide well-developed support programmes for obese patients, as per a survey of primary care nurses reported in the latest Journal of Advanced Nursing.

Sheffield-based scientists surveyed just under 400 nurses in the north of England in mid 2006, including district nurses, practice nurses and health visitors.

Their aim was to ask the nurses about their clinical practice, views and support for patients with obesity.

The scientists discovered that 89 per cent of nurses recognise the need for more effective primary care services to tackle obesity and see obesity advice and support as part of their role.

However, one in five nurses also admitted that they felt awkward or embarrassed about talking to patients about obesity and only a fifth felt they were effective when it came to helping patients to lose weight.

Half said that they found providing care and support for obese patients especially rewarding, but some also expressed negative attitudes and beliefs.

Its estimated that one in five adults in the survey area which covered four primary care trusts in the north of England - are obese, reflecting national UK trends.

A number of of the nurses in the current survey also had weight problems - 14 per cent were obese and 29 per cent were overweight.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


July 26, 2007, 9:42 PM CT

Weight and pregnancy

Weight and pregnancy
Gaining or losing weight in between pregnancies can have major health implications for an unborn baby, warn two senior obstetricians in todays BMJ.

While weight and obesity have long concerned women in relation to body image and lifestyle issues, few are aware of the possible risks that fluctuating weight could have on their unborn child, write Dr Jennifer Walsh and Professor Deirdre Murphy.

They point to two studies. The first, from Sweden, which observed that weight gain between pregnancies was strongly linked to major complications for the woman and baby in the months preceding, during and just after childbirth. This was independent of whether a woman was, by definition, overweight.

The scientists studied 207,534 women from the beginning of their first pregnancy to the beginning of their second. They found increased rates of pre-eclampsia, diabetes in the expectant mother, pregnancy induced hypertension and high birth weight if a womans body mass index (BMI) increased by just one to two units. A rise of more than three BMI units significantly increased the rate of stillbirths.

The key message, say the authors, is that women of normal weight should avoid gaining weight between pregnancies, while overweight and obese women are likely to benefit from weight loss before becoming pregnant.........

Posted by: Emily      Read more         Source


July 25, 2007, 5:01 AM CT

Metabolic Defect In Liver That Can Lead To Obesity

Metabolic Defect In Liver That Can Lead To Obesity
Scientists at the Monell Chemical Senses Center have identified a genetically-transmitted metabolic defect that can lead to obesity in some individuals. The defect involves decreased production of liver enzymes needed to burn fat and may help to explain why some people become obese while others remain thin.

The global obesity epidemic is believed to be caused in part by the increased availability and intake of high calorie foods rich in fat and carbohydrates. These foods promote weight gain in humans and other animals, leading to a diet-induced obesity. The propensity to gain weight and become obese when consuming a high-fat diet is at least partially controlled by genes.

Results of this study help explain the interaction between genes and diet that underlies diet-induced obesity, comments senior author Mark Friedman. They also point to a way to identify individuals at risk for dietary obesity, perhaps even during childhood before the development of unhealthy eating habits.

The current study, reported in the recent issue of Metabolism, demonstrates that genetic susceptibility to diet-induced obesity is due to a reduced capacity to burn fat.

Fat is one of the fuels that the bodys cells burn to provide energy. This process, known as fat oxidation, takes place inside mitochondria, the cells power plants for generating energy.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


July 19, 2007, 10:41 PM CT

How Diet And Exercise Enhance Longevity

How Diet And Exercise Enhance Longevity
The traditional prescriptions for a healthy lifesensible diet, exercise and weight controlextend life by reducing signaling through a specific pathway in the brain, as per Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists who discovered the connection while studying long-lived mice.

They said their findings underscore the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle and may also offer promising research directions for understanding and treating diabetes and Alzheimers disease.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Morris F. White and colleagues published their findings in the July 20, 2007, issue of the journal Science. Akiko Taguchi and Lynn Wartschow in Whites laboratory in the Division of Endocrinology at Childrens Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School were co-authors of the research article.

In their experiments, the scientists sought to understand the role of the insulin-like signaling pathway in extending lifespan. This pathway governs growth and metabolic processes in cells throughout the body. The pathway is activated when insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 switch on proteins inside the cell called insulin receptor substrates (Irs).

Other scientists had shown that reducing the activity of the pathway in roundworms and fruitflies extends lifespan. Despite those tantalizing clues, White said, The idea that insulin reduces lifespan is difficult to reconcile with decades of clinical practice and scientific investigation to treat diabetes.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


July 19, 2007, 10:28 PM CT

Obesity a risk factor for multiple myeloma

Obesity a risk factor for multiple myeloma
An obese person is more likely than a lean person to develop multiple myeloma, as per scientists from Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard School of Public Health. Their findings indicate that Body Mass Index (BMI) a statistical measure that scales weight to height provides an indicator for ones risk of developing multiple myeloma, a cancer of the blood cells that produce antibodies. Multiple myeloma currently affects more than 50,000 people in the U.S., and the five-year survival rates of the cancer are below 40 percent.

The study, reported in the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, takes its data from over 100,000 participants in the on-going Nurses Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, two similar large-scale studies. The study findings were similar to those from previously published studies that included smaller numbers of multiple myeloma patients, and/or were based on a one-time recording of height and weight.

I find the results of these studies encouraging, since they show consistent results about the first risk factor for multiple myeloma that people can actually modify, said the studys lead author Brenda M. Birmann, Sc.D., a researcher in the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Treatment options for this disease are improving, but it is also important to identify risk factors that could be modified. We would like to learn how to prevent its occurrence.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 17, 2007, 10:45 PM CT

Adult type 2 diabetes : exercise seems good

Adult type 2 diabetes : exercise seems good
There are no high quality data to assess how well dietary therapys for type 2 diabetes work in people who have just been told they have the disease, but there is evidence that taking on exercise seems to be one way of improving blood sugar levels, as per the findings of a Cochrane Systematic Review.

Type 2 diabetes leaves a person at danger of having elevated levels of sugar (glucose) in their blood. This high sugar content then causes damage to blood vessels, which in turn harms a number of organs including the eyes, nerves, kidneys and heart.

When people are first diagnosed with this disease they are given dietary advice in the hope that this will enable them to take more control over the level of sugar in their blood. However, after searching published scientific literature, a team of Cochrane Scientists was unable to find high quality data that showed whether dietary advice did indeed alter the risk of developing long-term complications, affect overall quality of life or the likelihood of dying.

We did find 36 published articles that reported work from 18 different trials which included a total of 1467 people with type 2 diabetes, but only a minority of these trials examined hard clinical endpoints such as death or vascular disease, and those that did offered no details; most talked about factors that are easier to measure such as weight or blood sugar control, says lead researcher Nield, a researcher at the University of Teesside in Middlesbrough, UK.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


July 17, 2007, 10:09 PM CT

Flavonoids in Orange Juice Make It a Healthy Drink

Flavonoids in Orange Juice Make It a Healthy Drink
Orange juice, despite its high caloric load of sugars, appears to be a healthy food for diabetics due to its mother lode of flavonoids, a study by endocrinologists at the University at Buffalo has shown.

The study appeared in the June 2007 issue of Diabetes Care.

Flavonoids suppress destructive oxygen free radicals -- also known as reactive oxygen species, or ROS. An overabundance of free radicals can damage all components of the cell, including proteins, fats and DNA, contributing to the development of a number of chronic diseases, including heart disease and stroke as well as diabetes.

"A number of major diseases are linked to oxidative stress and inflammation in the arterial wall, so the search for foods that are least likely to cause these conditions must be pursued," said Paresh Dandona, M.D., Ph.D., head of the Diabetes-Endocrinology Center of Western New York and senior author on the study.

"Our prior work has shown that 300 calories of glucose induces ROS and other proinflammatory responses," said Dandona, who is Distinguished Professor of Medicine in the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

"We hypothesized that 300 calories-worth of orange juice or of fructose would induce less oxidative stress and inflammation than caused by the same amount of calories from glucose."........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source



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Did you know?
Exercise can't stop the aging process, but experts at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston say that for the elderly, whether it's weight training, walking, swimming or biking, 30 minutes of exercise three to five times a week is a good prescription for aging."It's never too late to start exercising," said Dr. Robert Roush, an associate professor of medicine-geriatrics at BCM. "Being physically active and exercising regularly can help prevent or delay some diseases and disabilities as people age.".

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