MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Archives of weight watcher's blog


Go Back to the main weight watcher's blog

Subscribe To Health Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Archives Of Weight Watcher's Blog From Medicineworld.Org


July 16, 2007, 10:30 PM CT

Would you like fries with that?

Would you like fries with that?
Exploiting interactions between food and drugs could dramatically lower the rapidly rising costs of several anticancer drugs, and perhaps a number of other medications, two cancer-pharmacology specialists suggest in a commentary in the July 16, 2007, issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

University of Chicago oncologists Mark Ratain, MD, and Ezra Cohen, MD, call attention to the flip side of recent studies showing how certain foods can alter absorption or delay breakdown of precisely targeted anti-cancer drugs.

Instead of seeing such studies as highlighting a dosing problem, Ratain and Cohen argue that results like this one should point scientists toward a partial solution, a novel way to decrease medicine costs while increasing benefits from these effective but expensive drugs.

The commentary was inspired by a study presented in June at the American Society for Clinical Oncology. Scientists from Dartmouth showed that taking the breast cancer drug lapatinib (TYKERB) with foodinstead of on an empty stomach as suggested on the labelresulted in more of the drug being absorbed and available to treat the cancer.

Patients currently take five 250 mg lapatinib tablets on an empty stomach. The study observed that taking the drug with a meal increased the bioavailability of the drug by 167 percent. Taking the drug with a high-fat meal boosted levels by 325 percent.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 12, 2007, 5:54 AM CT

Could targeted food taxes improve health?

Could targeted food taxes improve health?
A daily pinta or a helping of dairy foods protect against the clustering of abnormal body chemistry known as the metabolic syndrome, suggests a study in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

The syndrome has been associated with an increased risk of diabetes, coronary artery disease, and premature death.

The findings are based on a representative sample of 2375 men aged between 45 and 59, all of whom were part of a long term study on health, known as the Caerphilly Prospective Study.

Two or more out of high blood glucose, insulin, blood fats, body fat, and blood pressure defined the presence of the metabolic syndrome in the men studied.

The mens health was tracked over 20 years, during which time data from food questionnaires and weekly food diaries were used to assess how much milk and dairy foods the men consumed.

Around one in seven men (15%) had metabolic syndrome at entry into the study.

These men had almost double the risk of coronary artery heart disease and four times the risk of diabetes of those without the syndrome. They were also almost 50% more likely to die early.

But those who regularly drank milk and ate dairy products, such as yogurt and cheese, were significantly less likely to have the syndrome.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 12, 2007, 5:49 AM CT

When it comes to walking, it's all good

When it comes to walking, it's all good
These days, its easy for people to get confused about exercise -- how a number of minutes a day should they spend working out, for how long and at what exertion level" Conflicting facts and opinions abound, but one Mayo Clinic doctor says the bottom line is this: walking is good, whether the outcome measurement is blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, joint problems or mental health.

Getting out there and taking a walk is what its all about, says James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., and a Mayo Clinic expert on obesity. You dont have to join a gym, you dont have to check your pulse. You just have to switch off the TV, get off the sofa and go for a walk.

The health benefit linked to walking is the subject of Dr. Levines editorial in the recent issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Dr. Levines piece is entitled, Exercise: A Walk in the Park" and accompanies a Proceedings article that showcases the merits of walking as beneficial exercise.

The study, undertaken by physicians from the Shinshu University Graduate School of Medicine in Matsumoto, Japan, determined that high-intensity interval walking may protect against hypertension and decreased muscle strength among older people.

Over five months, the Japanese scientists studied 246 adults who engaged in either no walking or moderate to high-intensity walking. The group who engaged in high-intensity walking experienced the most significant improvement in their health, the scientists found.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 11, 2007, 5:23 AM CT

Early Warning Of Deep Belly Fat

Early Warning Of Deep Belly Fat
Measuring levels of a chemical found in blood offers the best indicator yet of the amount of fat surrounding abdominal organs, as per a new study of lean and obese individuals published in the recent issue of Cell Metabolism, a publication of Cell Press. The buildup of such visceral fat is of particular health concern as it has been associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease risk.

The researchers, including Barbara Kahn and Timothy Graham of Harvard Medical School and Matthias Blher of the University of Leipzig in Gera number of, showed that retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is produced in much greater amounts by visceral fat in comparison to the subcutaneous fat that lies just beneath the skin. Moreover, they report that blood serum levels of RBP4 jump in people who are obese, who have double or even triple the concentrations found in individuals of normal weight.

We think that in the near future, measurements of RBP4 serum concentrations might serve as a novel biomarker for visceral obesity and increased risk for type 2 diabetes and other adverse outcomes of visceral obesity, said Blher. In addition, pharmacological interventions that reduce RBP4 levels might be a new approach in the therapy of metabolic syndrome and visceral obesity.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


July 10, 2007, 4:50 AM CT

Western-style 'meat-sweet' Diet Increases Risk Of Breast Cancer

Western-style 'meat-sweet' Diet Increases Risk Of Breast Cancer
A new study finds that the more western the diet -- marked by red meat, starches and sweets -- the greater the risk for breast cancer among postmenopausal Chinese women. As per scientists who conducted the analysis at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, Harvard University, Shanghai Cancer Institute, and Vanderbilt University, the findings mark the first time a specific association between a western diet and breast cancer has been identified in Asian women.

The study, reported in the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, is the latest set of findings derived from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study, conducted in the 1990s by Wei Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H, and his colleagues at Vanderbilt University. The Fox Chase scientists identified dietary habits among women in the study based on their reported eating habits, classifying them as either meat-sweet or vegetable-soy eaters.

The Shanghai data gave us a unique look at a population of Chinese women who were beginning to adopt more western-style eating habits, said, Marilyn Tseng, Ph.D. associate member in the population science division at Fox Chase. We found an association between a western-style diet and breast cancer was pronounced in postmenopausal women, particularly heavier women with estrogen receptor-positive tumors.........

Posted by: Janet      Read more         Source


July 8, 2007, 10:11 PM CT

obesity drug and new cancer treatments

obesity drug and new cancer treatments
Based on their surprising discovery that an obesity drug can kill cancer cells, researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine have made a new finding about the drugs effects and are working to design more potent cancer therapys.

Published online today in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, the study is the first to report how the drug orlistat (Xenical or Alli) binds and interacts with a protein found in tumor cells. The drug blocks the proteins function and causes cell death.

The project started five years ago when Steven Kridel, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Cancer Biology, analyzed prostate cancer cells to see which enzymes were expressed at high levels. His hope was that therapys to inhibit those enzymes could also stop tumor growth.

We observed that a protein known as fatty acid synthase is expressed at high levels in prostate tumor cells, and is fairly absent in normal cells, said Kridel.

Other research has shown that the protein is found in a number of tumor cells including breast, colon, ovarian, liver, lung and brain.

High levels of fatty acid synthase correlate with a poor prognosis so it is a great therapy target, said Kridel. This makes an exciting therapy target because theoretically you dont have to worry about harming nearby healthy tissue.........

Posted by: Scott      Read more         Source


June 20, 2007, 10:05 AM CT

Obesity And Enlarged Heart

Obesity And Enlarged Heart
New research from The University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center helps explain why excessive body weight increases the risk for heart disease.

In the largest study of its kind, heart specialist M. Reza Movahed, MD, PhD, and research specialist Adolfo A. Martinez, MD, discovered that excessive body weight is linked to a thickening of the heart muscle in the left ventricle, the hearts pumping chamber. Known to physicians as left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), the condition potentially can lead to heart failure and rhythm problems.

We found that the thickening in the muscle wall becomes particularly noticeable in obese patients who have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or greater, says Dr. Movahed. Prior studies have shown that left ventricular hypertrophy is linked to a higher risk of mortality.

Analyzing 17,261 heart ultrasounds, the UA scientists studied moving images of the heart to evaluate structure and function. Results showed that narrowing of the aortic valve, the main valve that carries blood away from the heart to the rest of the body, was the strongest predictor of LVH, followed by gender and Body Mass Index.

While the cause of LVH in obese patients is not known, it may be correlation to increased work load or to the presence of other cardiac risk factors in these patients.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


June 18, 2007, 9:41 PM CT

Fat fish put obesity on the hook

Fat fish put obesity on the hook
Everyone knows that eating lean fish helps slim waistlines, but scientists from the Center for the Study of Weight Regulation and Associated Disorders at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, OR, have found a new way fish can help eliminate obesity. In a study would be reported in the July 2007 print issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists describe the first genetic model of obesity in a fish. Having this model should greatly accelerate the development of new drugs to help people lose weight and keep it off.

As per corresponding author Roger Cone, Being able to model human disorders like obesity in zebrafish allows researchers to understand the molecular basis of disease. This may ultimately increase the efficiency and power of the drug discovery process, thus bringing new medicines to the market faster and cheaper.

In the study, scientists caused obesity in zebrafish by introducing the same type of genetic mutation that causes severe obesity in humans. The genetic change blocks the activity of a receptor, the melanocortin-4 receptor, which is at the heart of a device in our brains called the adipostat. The adipostat regulates body weight homeostatically, like the thermostat in a house, and works to keep long-term energy storesa.k.a. body fatconstant. The adipostat is what makes it difficult for people to lose weight and keep it off.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


June 5, 2007, 0:20 AM CT

Pancreatic Surgery Riskier for Obese Patients

Pancreatic Surgery Riskier for Obese Patients
Obesity may contribute to a greater likelihood of post-operative complications for patients having pancreatic surgery, a surgeon at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital has found.

A study of 202 pancreatic surgeries from 2000 to 2005 indicates obese patients had an increased time on the operating table, blood loss, length of hospital stay and rate of serious complications in comparison to normal weight individuals, said Adam Berger, M.D., assistant professor of surgery at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University.

"A rise in a patient's Body Mass Index (BMI) is one of the most important health issues facing health care professionals today," Dr. Berger noted. "Higher BMI can lead to a greater risk of a patient developing diabetes and heart disease, as well as esophageal and pancreas cancers.

"Increased BMI has been demonstrated to be an important factor predicting perioperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing numerous operations," Dr. Berger added.

At the time of surgeries, 85 (46 percent) patients were normal weight, 54 (29 percent) were overweight and 45 (25 percent) were obese, the study indicates. There were four perioperative patient deaths (2 percent), two of which were in the normal weight group and two in the obese group.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source


May 21, 2007, 10:52 AM CT

Impact Of Lifestyle On GI Health

Impact Of Lifestyle On GI Health
As per new research presented today at Digestive Disease Week 2007 (DDW), lifestyle factors like choosing your diet regimen or ordering an appetizer for dinner may have a significant impact on the gastrointestinal (GI) system, affecting your risk for certain diseases, weight and general GI-related activity. DDW is the largest international gathering of physicians and scientists in the fields of gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery.

"A number of factors come into play when managing a healthy lifestyle. While some factors may be difficult for patients to change, other simple adjustments, such as adopting a vegetarian diet early in life or ordering the appropriate soup while eating out, may result in decreased risk for obesity and colon cancer," said Alan Buchman, M.D., MSPH, AGAF, Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University School of Medicine. "The studies presented today further demonstrate how scientists are beginning to understand the links between digestive diseases and lifestyle most notably, diet".



Life Long Vegetarian Diet Reduces the Risk of Colorectal Cancer (Abstract #155)


The average person's lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) is about seven percent and the role of diet in preventing this type of cancer remains under debate. Most of all, prior studies enrolled middle-aged subjects, raising the possibility that CRC development may start before common interventions. Scientists from Tata Memorial Hospital (TMH) in Mumbai, India, set out to determine whether a vegetarian diet is linked to reduced risk of CRC if started very early in life.........

Posted by: JoAnn      Read more         Source



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20  

Did you know?
Exercise can't stop the aging process, but experts at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston say that for the elderly, whether it's weight training, walking, swimming or biking, 30 minutes of exercise three to five times a week is a good prescription for aging."It's never too late to start exercising," said Dr. Robert Roush, an associate professor of medicine-geriatrics at BCM. "Being physically active and exercising regularly can help prevent or delay some diseases and disabilities as people age.".

Medicineworld.org: Archives of weight watcher's blog

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.