MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

From Medicineworld.org: Prostate Cancer News Blog

Prostate cancer main ProstateNews Bladder cancer  

Subscribe To Prostate Cancer News Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Prostate Cancer News Blog From Medicineworld.Org


August 23, 2010, 7:12 AM CT

Cost of prostate cancer care

Cost of prostate cancer care

A new analysis has observed that short-term and long-term costs of prostate cancer care vary considerably based on which therapy strategy a man initially receives. Published early online in Cancer, a peer-evaluated journal of the American Cancer Society, the study finds that therapys that appears to be less expensive in the short-term may have higher long-term costs.

For men with early stage prostate cancer, various therapys are available, including surgery, radiation treatment, hormonal therapy, watchful waiting, or combinations of the above. A variety of factors determines which therapy is appropriate for a given man, and in some cases, a man appears to be able to choose among several options. Cost is one of a number of factors to consider when choosing among these options.

To determine how the initial therapy received by men with early stage prostate cancer affects costs of medical care both in the short-term (first year following diagnosis) and long-term (across five years of follow-up), Claire Snyder, PhD, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore led a team that evaluated early stage prostate-cancer cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database. (This database combines cancer incidence and survival data from US population-based cancer registries with Medicare administrative claims.) Patients included 13,769 men aged 66 years or older who were diagnosed in 2000 and were followed for 5 years. They were divided into groups based on the therapy they received during the first 9 months after diagnosis: watchful waiting, radiation, hormonal treatment, hormonal treatment plus radiation, and surgery (men in this latter group may have received hormones and/or radiation as well). Treatment costs were divided into initial (months -1 to 12), long-term (each 12 months thereafter), and total (months -1 to 60) costs. The incremental costs of care were calculated as the difference in medical costs for patients versus a group of similar men without cancer.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


August 9, 2010, 7:25 AM CT

Surgery, radiation or hormone

Surgery, radiation or hormone
Surgery for localized prostate cancer offers a significantly higher survival rate than either external-beam radiation or hormonal therapies, as per a newly released study led by scientists at UCSF.

The differences among therapies were more prominent at higher levels of cancer risk, and suggest, the scientists say, that in a number of cases surgery should play a greater role in therapy strategies for prostate cancer patients that is likely to recur or spread.

The study is available online in the journal "Cancer," the journal of the American Cancer Society, at this site

Most prior reports comparing therapy outcomes among different therapy options have looked only at PSA responses to therapy, rather than at the more important long-term survival outcomes, as per the researchers. Measuring levels of PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, in the blood, is intended to help determine whether prostate cancer has recurred or spread, eventhough in a number of cases a rising PSA level does not necessarily mean the cancer will progress.

Roughly one man in six will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men, as per the American Cancer Society.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


September 28, 2009, 6:55 AM CT

How income affects prostate cancer survival

How income affects prostate cancer survival
Prostate cancer patients who is living on low income is likely to die earlier compared to prostate cancer patients who are economically in a more advantageous position. That is the finding of a new study from Swiss researchers to be published in the December 1, 2009 issue of Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study's findings indicate that poor prostate cancer patients receive worse care than their wealthier counterparts.

A number of of the prior studies on socioeconomic status (SES) and prostate cancer mortality are from North America, especially from the United States. Scientists wanted to know how disparities affected prostate cancer mortality in Switzerland, a country with an extremely well developed health care system and where healthcare costs, medical coverage, and life expectancy are among the highest in the world, Elisabetta Rapiti, M.D., MPH, of the University of Geneva and her colleagues conducted a population-based study that included all residents of the region who were diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer between 1995 and 2005.

The analysis included 2,738 patients identified through the Geneva Cancer Registry. A patient with prostate cancer was classified as having high, medium, or low socioeconomic status on the basis of his occupation at the time of diagnosis. The researchers compared patient and tumor characteristics, as well as therapys among the different socioeconomic groups.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


June 21, 2009, 9:28 PM CT

Dramatic outcomes in prostate cancer study

Dramatic outcomes in prostate cancer study
Two Mayo Clinic patients whose prostate cancer had been considered inoperable are now cancer free thanks in part to an experimental drug treatment that was used in combination with standardized hormone therapy and radiation treatment. The men were participating in a clinical trial of an immunotherapeutic agent called MDX-010 or ipilimumab. In these two cases, physicians say the approach initiated the death of a majority of cancer cells and caused the tumors to shrink dramatically, allowing surgery. In both cases, the aggressive tumors had grown well beyond the prostate into the abdominal areas.

"The goal of the study was to see if we could modestly improve upon current therapys for advanced prostate cancer," says Eugene Kwon, M.D., Mayo Clinic urologist and leader of the clinical trial. "The candidates for this study were people who didn't have a lot of other options. However, we were startled to see responses that far exceeded any of our expectations".

The patients first received a type of hormone treatment called androgen ablation, which removes testosterone and commonly causes some initial reduction in tumor size. Scientists then introduced a single dose of ipilimumab, an antibody, which builds on the anti-tumor action of the hormone and causes a much larger immune response, resulting in massive death of the tumor cells. Both men experienced consistent drops in their prostate specific antigen (PSA) counts over the following weeks until both were deemed eligible for surgery. Then, during surgery, came a greater surprise.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


June 9, 2009, 5:00 AM CT

Dynamic stroma microenvironment in prostate cancer

Dynamic stroma microenvironment in prostate cancer
As stroma the supportive framework of the prostate gland react to prostate cancer, changes in the expression of genes occur that induce the formation of new structures such as blood vessels, nerves and parts of nerves, said scientists at Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears in the current issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research

In this study, using special techniques and gene chips that allowed them to sample the entire genome, the scientists found changes in 1,141 genes. They were either upregulated meaning that there was more of the protein with which they were associated than expected or downregulated, which meant the opposite, said Dr. Michael Ittmann, professor of pathology at BCM and a senior author of the report. These gene changes may explain why men with reactive stroma face a more aggressive disease, said Ittmann and Dr. Gustavo Ayala, professor in the departments of pathology and urology at BCM and another senior author.

"Often in prostate cancer, you don't see much change in the stromal cells," said Ittmann. "However, in this subgroup of patients (in which the stroma become visibly reactive), you see a histologically recognizable change in the appearance of the stroma. Dr. Ayala has shown previously that this correlates with a bad prognosis. We know the stroma are doing something to promote bad behavior in cancer cells".........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


April 9, 2009, 4:50 AM CT

New drug for prostate cancer?

New drug for prostate cancer?
A new multi-center study shows that an experimental drug lowers prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels a marker for tumor growth in men with advanced prostate cancer for whom traditional therapy options have failed. The study, led by scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), is published recently in Science Express, the online version of the journal Science

Most men with metastatic prostate cancer eventually build up resistance to the drugs that lower or block male hormones and develop a more aggressive form of the illness called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), or hormone-refractory disease. As per the study's findings, researchers studied two novel compounds, RD162 and MDV3100, and not only gained an understanding of their novel mechanism of action, but observed that these agents showed activity in CRPC cells in culture and in mice.

The study also reports on a Phase 1/2 trial of MDV3100 in 30 patients with advanced CRPC and observed that 22 out of 30 men showed declining PSA levels, and 13 out of 30 men (43 percent) had PSA levels fall by more than half.

Several years ago, the senior author of the study, Charles Sawyers, MD, and colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), uncovered a potential reason why metastatic patients with prostate cancer eventually relapse with CRPC. This insight was used to discover RD162 and MDV3100.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


April 8, 2009, 5:05 AM CT

Treating drug-resistant prostate cancer

Treating drug-resistant prostate cancer
A new treatment for metastatic prostate cancer has shown considerable promise in early clinical trials involving patients whose disease has become resistant to current drugs.

Of 30 men who received low doses of one the drugs in a multisite phase I/II trial designed to evaluate safety, 22 showed a sustained decline in the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in their blood. Phase III clinical trials are planned to evaluate the drug's effect on survival in a large group of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

The drugs are second-generation antiandrogen therapies that prevent male hormones from stimulating growth of prostate cancer cells. The new compounds manufactured by the pharmaceutical company Medivation and known as MDV3100 and RD162 appear to work well even in prostate cells that have a heightened sensitivity to hormones. That heightened sensitivity makes prostate cancer cells resistant to existing antiandrogen therapies.

The drugs were discovered in the laboratory of Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Charles Sawyers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in collaboration with chemist Michael Jung at UCLA. He and colleagues described the development of the drugs and initial testing in an article posted online April 9, 2009, in Science Express, which provides electronic publication of selected Science articles in advance of print. Sawyers's team collaborated on the studies with scientists from the University of California Los Angeles, Oregon Health and Science University, University of Washington and Medivation.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


October 1, 2007, 5:06 AM CT

Standard treatment for prostate cancer may encourage spread

Standard treatment for prostate cancer may encourage spread
A popular prostate cancer therapy called androgen deprivation treatment may encourage prostate cancer cells to produce a protein that makes them more likely to spread throughout the body, a new study by Johns Hopkins scientists suggests.

Eventhough the finding could eventually lead to changes in this standard therapy for a sometimes deadly disease, the Johns Hopkins scientists caution that their discovery is far too preliminary for patients with prostate cancer or physicians to stop using it. The treatment is effective at slowing tumor growth, they emphasized.

David Berman, an assistant professor of pathology, urology and oncology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and colleagues identified the unsuspected potential problem with therapys that suppress testosterone after discovering that the gene that codes for the protein, called nestin, was active in lab-grown human prostate cancer cells.

Curious about whether prostate cancer cells in people also produce nestin, the scientists looked for it in cells taken from men who had surgery to remove locally confined cancers of their prostates and found none. But when they looked for nestin in prostate cancer cells isolated from patients who had died of metastatic prostate cancer - in which cancer cells spread out from the prostate tumor - they found substantial evidence that the nestin gene was active.........

Posted by: Mark      Read more         Source


July 8, 2007, 10:06 PM CT

Genetic Risk Factor For Colorectal And Prostate Cancer

Genetic Risk Factor For Colorectal And Prostate Cancer
A study led by scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) has observed that one of seven genetic risk factors previously identified as increasing the probability of developing prostate cancer also increases the probability of developing colorectal cancer. As in the prior prostate cancer study, which was also conducted by USC scientists and reported in the April 2007 edition of Nature Genetics, the colorectal cancer risk factor is located in a region of the human genome devoid of known genes on chromosome 8. The studys complete findings would be reported in the July 8 online edition of Nature Genetics.

This is an important finding because, for the first time, a common genetic risk factor for multiple cancers has been identified, says lead author Christopher Haiman, assistant professor of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. Adding, There appears to be something fundamental occurring in this region that influences not only colorectal and prostate cancer, but perhaps cancers in general. (Another recently published study, in which USC scientists also were involved, identified variants in this same chromosomal region as playing a predictive role relative to the risk of developing breast cancer.).

For the current colorectal cancer study, the USC team genotyped six of the seven variants previously identified as increasing the risk of prostate cancer development. The samples analyzed totaled 1,807 invasive colorectal cancer cases and 5,511 controls. These samples were drawn from five populations (African Americans, Japanese Americans, Native Hawaiians, Latinos, and European Americans) included in the Multiethnic Cohort Study, an epidemiological study of more than 215,000 people from Los Angeles and Hawaii created in 1993 by Brian Henderson, dean, Keck School of Medicine of USC, and Laurence Kolonel of the University of Hawaii.........

Posted by: Sue      Read more         Source


December 13, 2006, 4:39 AM CT

Older Men With Early Prostate Cancer

Older Men With Early Prostate Cancer
Recent findings from an observational study by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine suggest that men between 65 and 80 years of age who received therapy for early stage, localized prostate cancer lived significantly longer than men who did not receive therapy. The study would be reported in the December 13th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Thanks to better cancer prevention education and the resulting wide-spread increase in using prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screenings, more men are being diagnosed with early-stage and low-or intermediate-grade prostate cancer. Studies have shown that the slow-developing nature of prostate cancer during its earliest stages makes therapy options, such as a radical prostatectomy (surgical removal of the prostate) and radiation treatment, controversial with unpredictable outcomes. Often, recently diagnosed men of this group were advised to just "watch and wait" to see how their situation progressed.

"For this study we looked back over the existing data of a large population of patients with prostate cancer, aged 65 to 80, with small tumors that were at a low or intermediate risk of spreading," said senior author Katrina Armstrong, MD, MSCE, who worked on the study with colleagues from Penn's Abramson Cancer Center, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Leonard Davis Institute of Health and Economics, and Division of Internal Medicine, and Fox Chase Cancer Center. "After accounting for all their differences, we discovered that the men - who within six months of diagnosis underwent surgery or radiation treatment - were 31 percent less likely to die than those who did not undergo therapy during that time".........

Posted by: Mark      Permalink         Source


November 5, 2006, 8:39 PM CT

Six Months Of Hormone Therapy Enough For Prostate Cancer

Six Months Of Hormone Therapy Enough For Prostate Cancer
Patients with prostate cancer treated with either radiation or surgery who use hormone treatment for longer than six months do not survive any longer than patients who use the therapy for a shorter amount of time, as per a research studypresented November 5, 2006, at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's 48th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.

"A number of patients with high risk prostate cancer are treated with two or more years of hormone treatment based on studies performed over a decade ago," said Cliff Robinson, M.D., lead author of the study and a radiation oncologist at Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. "Our study's findings suggest that treating current patients with shorter-term hormone treatment may not only be equally effective, but also improve their quality of life, due to a lesser degree of therapy side effects."

The authors also observed that patients receiving longer than six months of hormone treatment were twice as likely to die as patients who use the therapy for a shorter amount of time. "The reasons why patients receiving longer term hormone treatment may do worse are unclear," said Dr. Robinson, who also cautions, "Many factors could complicate the issue, and this area needs further investigation before any conclusions can be drawn".........

Posted by: Mark      Permalink         Source


November 5, 2006, 8:33 PM CT

Why Men With Prostate Cancer Avoid Radiation?

Why Men With Prostate Cancer Avoid Radiation?
Negative perceptions about radiation treatment can strongly influence a prostate cancer patient's choice to avoid external beam radiation treatment, even though studies have proven the therapy to be as safe and effective as other therapys for the disease, including surgery, as per a research studypresented November 5, 2006, at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's 48th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.

"The study shows that patients base their therapy choice not only on technical information, but also on cultural and personal prejudices," said Riccardo Valdagni, M.D., an author of the study and head of the Prostate Programme at the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori in Milan, Italy. "It's important for patients to express their fears about radiation therapy to their doctors and for doctors to consider these worries and address any misconceptions about this treatment so that patients can make the best, most informed decision about their therapy".

Men with prostate cancer often choose between external beam radiation treatment, radiation seed implants and surgery to treat their cancer. During external beam radiation, a beam of radiation, or X-ray, is directed through the skin to the cancer and the immediate surrounding area to kill the cancer. To minimize side effects, radiation is given five days a week for several weeks. A number of men with prostate cancer choose external beam radiation over other therapys because it is non-invasive, has a short recovery period and often helps men preserve their sexual and urinary function.........

Posted by: Mark      Permalink         Source


September 25, 2006, 9:59 PM CT

Gene Therapy For Prostate Cancer

Gene Therapy For Prostate Cancer
Scientists at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) are hoping a new gene treatment that takes a gene called RTVP-1 directly into the prostate tumor will prove effective in preventing recurrence of the disease.

The first phase of the study is designed to test the safety of the therapy and determine the proper dosage of gene, said Dr. Dov Kadmon, professor of urology at BCM. It will be carried out in the department of urology at BCM as well as at Ben Taub General Hospital, The Methodist Hospital and Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

"We are treating patients who are scheduled for a prostatectomy (prostate removal) but who also have a high risk that their disease will recur (or come back)," said Kadmon. "The operation itself is highly successful in eradicating local tumors (in the prostate)".

The design of the study is simple, said Kadmon.

"One injection into the prostate that should take no more than 10 minutes, eventhough patients will be monitored in a special unit of the hospital for 23 hours to make sure there are no side effects. After that, they come to the unit for a check-up once a week".

After about 30 days, the subjects undergo their surgery, which has already been scheduled, he said. He said the hope is that the gene treatment will reduce the risk that cancer will recur at or near the site of the tumor as well as in distant points in the body.........

Posted by: Mark      Permalink         Source


July 1, 2006, 9:56 AM CT

Pomegranate Juice Keeps PSA Levels Stable

Pomegranate Juice Keeps PSA Levels Stable
Drinking an eight ounce glass of pomegranate juice daily increased by nearly four times the period during which PSA levels in men treated for prostate cancer remained stable, a three-year UCLA study has observed.

The study involved 50 men who had undergone surgery or radiation but quickly experienced increases in prostate-specific antigen or PSA, a biomarker that indicates the presence of cancer. UCLA scientists measured "doubling time," how long it takes for PSA levels to double, a signal that the cancer is progressing, said Dr. Allan Pantuck, an associate professor of urology, a Jonsson Cancer Center researcher and lead author of the study.

Doubling time is crucial in prostate cancer, Pantuck said, because patients who have short doubling times are more likely to die from their cancer. The average doubling time is about 15 months. In the UCLA study, Pantuck and his team observed increases in doubling times from 15 months to 54 months, an almost four-fold increase.

"That's a big increase. I was surprised when I saw such an improvement in PSA numbers," Pantuck said. "In older men 65 to 70 who have been treated for prostate cancer, we can give them pomegranate juice and it may be possible for them to outlive their risk of dying from their cancer. We're hoping we may be able to prevent or delay the need for other therapies commonly used in this population such as hormone therapy or chemotherapy, both of which bring with them harmful side effects".........

Posted by: Mark      Permalink         Source


June 19, 2006, 9:24 PM CT

Suggest your News Item To Medicineworld

Suggest your News Item To Medicineworld
As you are aware we are the leading publishers of health news on the web. We publish news items in various forms including numerous blogs and news items. We invite you to participate in our new collection.

We are looking for quality news items that would be interesting to our readers. Now you may suggest the news item from your site to be included at Medicineworld.org. Inclusion of news item at our site get instantaneous attention since the item is illustrated from various blog posts. Addition of pictures to the item adds additional attraction to your news item. Inclusion in the Medicineworld.org site brings quality links and visitors to your site.

If you have an interesting news item related to health, share it with Medicineworld.org and we share it with the world.

Suggest your News Item To Medicineworld........

Posted by: Janet      Permalink



Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4  

Did you know?
In the largest study of its kind to date, Mayo Clinic scientists report that prostate specific antigen (PSA) kinetics, both velocity and doubling time, can be used to predict disease progression and likelihood of death after radical prostatectomy surgery, suggesting that this could be used to guide treatment decisions. Study results are published in the December issue of The Journal of Urology.

Medicineworld.org: Prostate Cancer News Blog

Comprehensive| Diagnosis of bladder cancer| Follow up of bladder cancer| Bladder cancer main| Overview of bladder cancer| Risk factors for bladder cancer| Screening for bladder cancer| Symptoms of bladder cancer| Treatment of bladder cancer|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.