MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Estrogen therapy and kidney stones

Back to obgyn news Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Obgyn News RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Estrogen therapy and kidney stones




Use of estrogen treatment is linked to an increased risk of developing kidney stones in postmenopausal women, as per a report in the October 11 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

"Nephrolithiasis [kidney stones] is a common condition that affects 5 percent to 7 percent of postmenopausal women in the United States," as per background information in the article. "Because the process of kidney stone formation is influenced by a variety of lifestyle and other health-related factors, the true impact of estrogen treatment on the risk of kidney stone formation is difficult to infer from findings based on observation."



Estrogen therapy and kidney stones

Using data from the national Women's Health Initiative study, Naim M. Maalouf, M.D., of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, examined data from two trials: 10,739 postmenopausal women with hysterectomy who received either an estrogen-only therapy or matching placebo and 16,608 postmenopausal women without hysterectomy who received either an estrogen plus progestin therapy or matching placebo. Data were collected for an average of 7.1 years in the estrogen-only trial and 5.6 years for the estrogen plus progestin trial.

A total of 335 cases of kidney stones were published in the active therapy groups, while 284 cases occurred in the placebo groups. The beginning demographic characteristics and risk factors for kidney stones were similar in the two groups, and the authors observed that estrogen treatment was linked to a significant increase in risk of kidney stones. The corresponding annualized incidence rate per 10,000 women per year was 39 in the therapy group and 34 in the placebo group. Development of kidney stones was five times more common in women with a history of kidney stones at the beginning of the study, but was not significantly altered by estrogen treatment. In this trial, estrogen treatment increased the risk of development of kidney stones irrespective of age, ethnicity, body mass index, previous hormone treatment use or use of coffee or thiazide diuretics.

The authors conclude that their results "indicate that estrogen treatment increases the risk of nephrolithiasis in healthy postmenopausal women. The mechanisms underlying this higher propensity remain to be determined. In view of the sizable prevalence of nephrolithiasis in this segment of the population, these findings need to be considered in the decision-making process regarding postmenopausal estrogen use."


Posted by: Emily    Source




Did you know?
Use of estrogen treatment is linked to an increased risk of developing kidney stones in postmenopausal women, as per a report in the October 11 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. "Nephrolithiasis [kidney stones] is a common condition that affects 5 percent to 7 percent of postmenopausal women in the United States," as per background information in the article. "Because the process of kidney stone formation is influenced by a variety of lifestyle and other health-related factors, the true impact of estrogen treatment on the risk of kidney stone formation is difficult to infer from findings based on observation."

Medicineworld.org: Estrogen therapy and kidney stones

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.