MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: No increased risk of ovarian cancer from fertility drugs

Back to obgyn news Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Obgyn News RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

No increased risk of ovarian cancer from fertility drugs




The use of fertility drugs does not increase a woman's risk of developing ovary cancer, finds a large study from Danish scientists published on bmj.com today.

During the past three decades there has been considerable debate as to whether use of fertility drugs increases a woman's risk of developing ovary cancer. Prior studies have given conflicting results and concerns remain, especially for women who undergo several cycles of therapy or who never succeed in becoming pregnant.

So Allan Jensen and his colleagues at the Danish Cancer Society examined the effects of fertility drugs on ovary cancer risk by using data from the largest cohort of infertile women to date.



No increased risk of ovarian cancer from fertility drugs

The study involved 54,362 women with infertility problems referred to all Danish fertility clinics between 1963 and 1998. 156 of these women had ovary cancer. After adjusting for several risk factors, the scientists assessed the effects of four groups of fertility drugs over an average period of 16 years.

They found no overall increased risk for ovary cancer after use of any fertility drug. They also found no increased risk among women who had undergone 10 or more cycles of therapy or among those who did not become pregnant.

Eventhough the authors did observe a statistically significant increase in risk of the most common serious type of ovary cancer among women who had used the drug clomiphene, they stress that this was probably a chance association.

Our results show no convincing association between the overall risk for ovary cancer and use of fertility drugs, and are generally reassuring, say the authors. However, they do point out that, as a number of of the study participants have still not reached the peak age for ovary cancer, they will continue to monitor the risk.

In a society where there is more and more female infertility and later age at birth of the first child, the unfavourable effects of fertility drugs should be balanced against the physical and psychological benefits of a pregnancy made possible only by the use of these drugs, they conclude.

These data are reassuring and provide further evidence that use of fertility drugs does not increase a woman's risk of ovary cancer to any great extent although, small increases in risk cannot be ruled out, warns Penelope Webb of the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, in an accompanying editorial.

Some women who take fertility drugs will inevitably develop ovary cancer by chance alone, she writes, but the existing evidence suggests that women who use these drugs are not increasing their risk of developing this highly fatal cancer.


Posted by: Emily    Source




Did you know?
The use of fertility drugs does not increase a woman's risk of developing ovary cancer, finds a large study from Danish scientists published on bmj.com today. During the past three decades there has been considerable debate as to whether use of fertility drugs increases a woman's risk of developing ovary cancer. Prior studies have given conflicting results and concerns remain, especially for women who undergo several cycles of therapy or who never succeed in becoming pregnant.

Medicineworld.org: No increased risk of ovarian cancer from fertility drugs

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.