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Medicineworld.org: Skin cancer risk from beach vacations

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Skin cancer risk from beach vacations




PHILADELPHIA Vacationing at the shore led to a 5 percent increase in nevi (more usually called "moles") among 7-year-old children, as per a paper published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Number of nevi is the major risk factor for cancerous melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer. Melanoma rates have been rising dramatically over recent decades. More than 62,000 Americans are diagnosed with melanoma each year and more than 8,000 die.

The study was conducted among children who lived in Colorado, but main author Lori Crane, Ph.D., M.P.H., chair of the Department of Community and Behavioral Health at the Colorado School of Public Health, said the findings are applicable worldwide.



Skin cancer risk from beach vacations

"Parents of young children need to be cautious about taking their kids on vacations that are going to be sun-intensive at waterside locations, where people are outside for whole days at a time in skin-exposing swimsuits," said Crane.

Crane said parents often mistakenly think that sunscreen is a cure-all. Eventhough it does offer some protection, the likelihood is that children stay out in the sun longer, thus increasing their risk.

"We recommend that, for young children, parents keep the kids involved in indoor activities from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. to decrease risk, or if they are to be outside, that they wear shirts with sleeves," said Crane.

Crane and his colleagues examined 681 white children born in 1998 who were lifetime residents of Colorado. Vacation histories were assessed by interview and skin exams were used to evaluate the development of nevi.

Scientists found that each waterside vacation one or more years previous to the exam at age 7 was associated with a 5 percent increase in nevi, or skin moles, less than two mm. "Daily sun exposure at home did not seem to be correlation to the number of moles, while waterside vacations were. Vacations may impart some unique risk for melanoma," said Crane.

Crane and his colleagues also observed that young boys had a 19 percent higher risk than young girls for nevi development. "This appears to be due to an increased likelihood among boys to want to stay outdoors," said Crane.

Finally, higher incomes were linked to greater risk, as those with higher incomes were more likely to take waterside vacations.


Posted by: George    Source




Did you know?
PHILADELPHIA Vacationing at the shore led to a 5 percent increase in nevi (more usually called "moles") among 7-year-old children, as per a paper published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Number of nevi is the major risk factor for cancerous melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer. Melanoma rates have been rising dramatically over recent decades. More than 62,000 Americans are diagnosed with melanoma each year and more than 8,000 die.

Medicineworld.org: Skin cancer risk from beach vacations

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