MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Action video games improve vision

Back to ophthalmology news Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Ophthalmology News RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Action video games improve vision




To learn whether high-action games could affect contrast sensitivity, Bavelier, in collaboration with graduate student Renjie Li and his colleagues Walt Makous, professor of brain and cognitive sciences at the University of Rochester, and Uri Polat, professor at the Eye Institute at Tel Aviv University, tested the contrast sensitivity function of 22 students, then divided them into two groups: One group played the action video games "Unreal Tournament 2004" and "Call of Duty 2." The second group played "The Sims 2," which is a richly visual game, but does not include the level of visual-motor coordination of the other group's games. The volunteers played 50 hours of their assigned games over the course of 9 weeks. At the end of the training, the students who played the action games showed an average 43% improvement in their ability to discern close shades of grayclose to the difference she had previously observed between game players and non-game playerswhereas the Sims players showed none.



Action video games improve vision
This is a Pelli-Robson chart showing decreasing contrast from upper left to lower right. True contrast varies between monitors.

"To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that contrast sensitivity can be improved by simple training," says Bavelier. "When people play action games, they're changing the brain's pathway responsible for visual processing. These games push the human visual system to the limits and the brain adapts to it, and we've seen the positive effect remains even two years after the training was over".

Bavelier says that the findings suggest that despite the a number of concerns about the effects of action video games and the time spent in front of a computer screen, that time may not necessarily be harmful, at least for vision.

Bavelier is now taking what she has learned with her video game research and collaborating with a consortium of scientists to look into therapys for amblyopia, a problem caused by poor transmission of the visual image to the brain.


Posted by: Mike    Source




Did you know?
To learn whether high-action games could affect contrast sensitivity, Bavelier, in collaboration with graduate student Renjie Li and his colleagues Walt Makous, professor of brain and cognitive sciences at the University of Rochester, and Uri Polat, professor at the Eye Institute at Tel Aviv University, tested the contrast sensitivity function of 22 students, then divided them into two groups: One group played the action video games "Unreal Tournament 2004" and "Call of Duty 2." The second group played "The Sims 2," which is a richly visual game, but does not include the level of visual-motor coordination of the other group's games. The volunteers played 50 hours of their assigned games over the course of 9 weeks. At the end of the training, the students who played the action games showed an average 43% improvement in their ability to discern close shades of grayclose to the difference she had previously observed between game players and non-game playerswhereas the Sims players showed none.

Medicineworld.org: Action video games improve vision

Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news| Pancreatic cancer news| Prostate cancer news| Endometrial cancer news| General info| What is cancer?| Cancer causes| Is cancer hereditary?| Types of cancer| Cancer statistics| Breast cancer main| Breast cancer symptoms| Colon cancer main| Anal cancer| Bladder cancer main| Lung cancer general| Lung cancer main| Non small cell| Small cell| Ovarian cancer main| Treatment of ovarian cancer| Prostate cancer main| Updates in oncology| Acute myeloid leukemia|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.