MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Canadian research breakthrough for cancer therapies

Back to cancer blog Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Cancer Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Canadian research breakthrough for cancer therapies




Scientists Dr. Marc Therrien at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) of the Universit de Montral, and Dr. Frank Sicheri, at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, have discovered a new target that appears to be instrumental in the development of new, more effective cancer therapies.

A recent article co-authored by Drs. Therrien and Sicheri and reported in the leading scientific journal Nature sheds new light on the activation mechanism of the RAF protein kinase which, when mutated, is responsible for more than 25 per cent of cancers. Understanding this mechanism may lead to novel anti-cancer agents designed to minimize the toxic side effects caused by chemotherapy.



Canadian research breakthrough for cancer therapies

The RAF family of kinases regulates various cellular processes including cell growth, differentiation and survival. The Therrien-Sicheri team is the first to show that the dimerization, or combination, of two RAF proteins is essential to its activation. Inhibiting the dimerization of RAF may therefore block its activation, thus stopping cancer cells from growing. The study exposes not only the activation mechanism of RAF, but potentially the mechanisms that control other protein kinases, a large number of which are associated with cancer and other diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and neurodegeneration.

"Basic scientists think that one of the most promising strategies to finding lifelong cures for cancers lies in understanding the molecular underpinnings specific to cancer cells," explains Dr. Therrien, "It is hoped that this will translate to the development of inhibitors tailored to specific molecular defects and, as a result, should increase the effectiveness of new target-based cancer therapies".

"Protein kinases are the targets for some of the most successful anti-cancer drugs in the clinic," says Dr. Sicheri. "Now that we have discovered how to turn off the RAF protein without interfering with other proteins, we appears to be able to design drugs that have unprecedented precision in targeting cancer cells while reducing the toxic side effects for patients".

The Therrien-Sicheri team intends to jointly pursue work in this area to identify drug-like molecules to block the dimerization process of RAF, which may possibly lead to the discovery of new classes of anti-cancer agents.


Posted by: Janet    Source




Did you know?
Scientists Dr. Marc Therrien at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) of the Universit de Montral, and Dr. Frank Sicheri, at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, have discovered a new target that appears to be instrumental in the development of new, more effective cancer therapies.

Medicineworld.org: Canadian research breakthrough for cancer therapies

Main Page| Cancer blog| Cancer blogs list| Lung cancer blog| Colon cancer blog| Prostate cancer blog| Breast cancer blog| Diabetes watch blog| Heart watch blog| Allergy blog| Bladder cancer blog| Cervical cancer blog| Colon cancer news blog| Diabetes news blog| Esophageal cancer blog| Gastric cancer blog| Health news blog| Heart news blog| Infectious disease blog| Kidney watch blog| Lung disease blog| Lung cancer news blog| Mesothelioma blog| Neurology blog| Breast cancer news blog| OBGYN blog| Ophthalmology blog| Ovarian cancer blog| Cancer news blog| Pancreas cancer blog| Pediatrics blog| Prostate cancer news blog| Psychology blog| Research blog| Rheumatology blog| Society news blog| Uterine cancer blog| Weight watch blog|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.